EA Still Wants Microtransactions in Star Wars Battlefront II

Eurogamer.net notes that Electronic Arts Chief Financial Officer Blake Jorgensen commented further on the microtransaction controversy in Star Wars Battlefront II during yesterday's Credit Suisse Annual Technology, Media & Telecom Conference. This situation has provoked so many negative stories (as recently as yesterday) that it's hard to believe the action game sequel came out under two weeks ago. Though the company suspended microtransactions based on the pay-to-win outrage from many fronts (possibly including IP owner Disney itself), Jorgensen says they are still hoping to add them back into the game. They quote him as saying "We're not giving up on the notion of MTX [microtransactions]," because they are looking at "layering in another economic model to try and make up for some of the economics you lose" by not selling DLC. They offer more of his statements on the controversy:
"We're really watching how people are playing the game. We're trying to understand are there certain modes where MTX may be more interesting than not? What are the consumers saying about it? How are the consumers playing the game? What do the metrics look like? We're learning and listening to the community to decide how best to roll that out in the future."

How did EA fail to see the loot box problem coming? "We did some testing around the MTX model but not enough to really understand some of the reactions we ultimately got," Jorgensen said. There were bigger concerns at the time such as the beta working with millions of people playing.

"We pulled-off on the MTX because the real issue the consumer had was they felt it was a pay-to-win mechanic," he added. "The reality is: there's different types of players in games. Some people have more money than time, and some people have more time than money, and you want to always balance those two.

"For us it's a great learning experience. We are trying to run the company with an ear to the consumer at all times, not only in the testing phase but when the game is up and running. We're trying to build games that last for years, not for months... If we're not making mistakes along the way and learning from them, that's when you should worry about us. But our view is these are great opportunities for us to continue to tune the game, to adjust things."