The Games as Art Debate

Video Game Makers Favor Diversion over Depth on NPR is a four-minute audio except from National Public Radio's All Things Considered program discussing the tackling of tough topics in video games. Along the way we hear from Ian Bogost, learning that the professor of game design at Georgia Tech feels it's time gamers "demand" games emulate Hollywood by taking on subjects like the war in Iraq and teen pregnancy. They also talk with Harvey Smith, saying his recent BlackSite: Area 51 comes closer than most games to succeeding in this regard. They quote Bogost on BlackSite's "importance," while also acknowledging the game was not successful commercially or critically, a point they don't seem interested in exploring in tying this all back into the question of whether video games represent art or entertainment. They do acknowledge that serious games about topics like genocide and third-world poverty are being created on the "fringes of the industry" but that these are "messages gussied up as games and they don't have to contend with the marketplace," a point made without any attempt at connecting cause-and-effect. The piece concludes quoting Bogost saying that until the mainstream games industry "gets serious, its cultural prominence is just a wasted opportunity."
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You have GOT to be kidding
Apr 15, 2008, 11:23
2.
You have GOT to be kidding Apr 15, 2008, 11:23
Apr 15, 2008, 11:23
 
"They also talk with Harvey Smith, saying his recent BlackSite: Area 51 comes closer than most games to succeeding in this regard"

Really? Blacksite Area 51 comes close to succeeding in mirroring "real life" issues? Yeah, that Area 51, it's been swarming with aliens for years, and our brave troops have to keep gunning them down in a really crappy shooter. And absolutely, Blacksite has been an "important" game, if only to show that you :

A) Do not have Harvey Smith make a game
B) Should not release crappy unfinished shooters in a market saturated with shooters, especially not when actually GREAT shooters like CoD4 and Crysis come out right around the same time. This != good business.

Also, games need to emulate Hollywood? Really? Because last I checked, games were now making more money than Hollywood, and at least with games you get an occasional really great game. When was the last time a really great movie came out? The last one I can even think of was Return of the King. The only thing Hollywood does is regurgitate already stale vomit. No Ian Bogost, you're right, that's what we need to emulate! Moron.

It's a fucking disgrace that you are teaching Game Design. That's probably why games suck so badly right now. Note to all wannabe game developers : Do not take Game Design at Georgia Tech.

"They do acknowledge that serious games about topics like genocide and third-world poverty are being created"

Who the fuck wants to play a game about third-world poverty??? Man, that sounds like an absolute LOAD of fun?

"quoting Bogost saying that until the mainstream games industry "gets serious, its cultural prominence is just a wasted opportunity."

You're a waste of internet bandwith, a waste of an IP address and most importantly, a waste of air. Stop breathing.

Creston

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