Out of the Blue

The kick off of the NFL season is always a welcome event in the BlueTower, but it always seems a bit early nevertheless. I'm sure looking forward to the Pats versus Raiders opener tonight, but the low temperature predicted for Foxboro this evening is over 60, and it's always a little weird to see football players covered in sweat instead of mud or snowflakes.

Opening Day Links: Thanks Mike Martinez and Ant.
Play Time: Pandora. Thanks Warren.
Stories: Terrorists Don't Do Movie Plots.
Three storms in turbulent Atlantic.
Shelters for Pets Fill With Furry Survivors (registration required).
Science: Carbon nanotube TV. CrestonVision.
Ice belt 'encircled Mars equator'.
Space Station Dumps Its Garbage.
Image: NVIDIA 7800 Won't Work. Thanks Flying Penguin.
Media: Woman Dies, Five Injured When Car Crashes Into Bar. Thanks Chris.
Auction: Golden Shower Set. Thanks Munchkin.
Follow-ups: No shuttle flights for a year?
Teh Funny: Dilbert.
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71 Replies. 4 pages. Viewing page 1.
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71.
 
Re: NanoTV
Sep 9, 2005, 21:36
71.
Re: NanoTV Sep 9, 2005, 21:36
Sep 9, 2005, 21:36
 
The lawmakers can't put into law something that the people obviously dont' want.

They can and they do. You really have a hard time understanding that America is not a democracy.

Perhaps the Federalist papers would help you understand our system of government a little better. Our government was created to ensure liberty, freedom and order, not majority rule. If they people still don't want it come next election they can change their minds then, until then we're stuck with our elected officials*.

*obviously there are exceptions, but direct voting takes a great deal of time and money, and is therefore impractical.

Edit:

Blow it out your ass, it could have been said the same if it had gone the other way.

Yes. It could have. That is my point. The majority of Americans wanted another person to be their president, but because this is not a direct democracy the person who won the electoral college was elected.

Final concluding summary (I'm so late in my replies I doubt this will ever be read, but w/e):

- Not even our president is elected directly.

- Aside from occasional referendums laws are passed by elected officals, and are never voted on to determine their popularity. Many bills are very unpopular with the general populace but pass regardless, because the general populace never votes on them.

This is our system of government. This was the intent of the founding fathers. That is all.


This comment was edited on Sep 9, 21:42.
I eat pasta!
70.
 
Re: NanoTV
Sep 9, 2005, 12:34
70.
Re: NanoTV Sep 9, 2005, 12:34
Sep 9, 2005, 12:34
 
It is an interesting system established in 1911 to allow private citizens to put to vote items they thought were important but were not being addressed by the legislative branch.

http://www.iandrinstitute.org/California.htm

Johnson and the new Progressive majority in the legislature made the most sweeping governmental changes ever seen in the history of California. Among these were the introduction of initiative, referendum, and recall at both the state and local levels. Voters ratified these amendments in a special election on October 10, 1911.

The first significant statewide initiative in California abolished the poll tax in 1914, and a construction bond initiative for the University of California also won voter approval that year. Immediately thereafter, anti-initiative forces launched their first counterattack, in the form of a constitutional amendment passed by the legislature to make it more difficult to pass initiative bond proposals. Haynes mobilized his pro-initiative forces and defeated the amendment at the polls in 1915.

On the ballot in 1934 were four successful constitutional initiatives to revamp the state's law enforcement and criminal justice systems. All four were sponsored by Alameda County District Attorney Earl Warren, who went on to become the state's attorney general in 1938, its governor in 1942, and the Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1953. The principal changes involved procedures for judicial selection and retention, and increasing the woefully inadequate powers and jurisdiction of the office of attorney general. Warren's foresight in revamping the justice system before running for attorney general accounted in no small measure for his effectiveness once elected, which in turn made possible his rise to higher office.

Each decade for the first half of this century, the number of signatures required to put a statewide initiative on the ballot roughly doubled. It was set at 8 percent of the number of votes cast in the previous gubernatorial election. In 1911 this was 30,481 signatures; in 1930, it was 91,529; in 1939, it was 212,117. The rapid change was due to California's explosive population growth and the increasing participation of women as voters. As petition requirements increased, the number of initiatives qualifying for the ballot decreased, particularly in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s.

The California initiative process gave rise to a new breed of campaign professional: the paid petition circulator. With signature requirements doubling nearly every decade, citizen groups were unable to rely solely on volunteer effort. As early as World War I, Joseph Robinson was offering his organizing services to initiative proponents. His firm, which paid its employees a fee for each signature brought in, had a virtual monopoly on the petition business from 1920 to 1948 - a period during which, Robinson estimated, his firm was involved in 98 percent of the successful statewide initiative petition drives. Robinson stayed in business into the late 1960s, when he offered his services to Ed and Joyce Koupal, but by then he had competitors.

One of California's most famous initiatives was Prop 13. "On June 6th, 1978, nearly two-thirds of California's voters passed Proposition 13, reducing property tax by about 57%. Prior to Proposition 13 property taxes were out of control. People were losing their homes because they could not pay their property taxes. Yet, government did nothing to help them. In the finest tradition of the Boston Tea Party, California taxpayers stood up and said no more to excessive taxes. The Proposition 13 Revolution swept the country and made headlines around the world. It began a change of thinking about the tax burden taxpayers had to bear. Proposition 13 also started a revolution in the people turning to the initiative process to gain a greater control over their lives." The above account, provided by the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, points out correctly that the modern day movement to utilize the initiative process was brought about by the passage of Prop 13.

In the last decade, Californians lead the nation in numerous reform efforts utilizing the initiative process including term limits, ending bilingual education, adopting animal protection laws, ending racial preferences, and adopting one of the most comprehensive drug reform measures in the country. This has lead to elected officials across the country vilifying the initiative process and have used the rhetoric “we don’t want to be like California” as their rallying cry in opposing the initiative process. They are concerned that the reforms adopted in California would come to their states – even though these are the reforms wanted by the people. However, Californians still overwhelmingly support the initiative process and have no desire for it to be abolished.

*** Warhawk ***

What's the plan?

Rescue the damsel in distress, kill the bad guy, save the world.

Have I lied to you? I mean, in this room? Trust me, leave that thing alone. - GLaDOS

Did IQs just drop sharply while I was away? - Ripley
69.
 
Re: NanoTV
Sep 9, 2005, 10:13
69.
Re: NanoTV Sep 9, 2005, 10:13
Sep 9, 2005, 10:13
 
Had America been a true representational democracy Dubya wouldn't have gotten his first term in office, but we're not.. so here we are.

Blow it out your ass, it could have been said the same if it had gone the other way.

/edit: Thank you Warhawk for stating the obvious that he left out. Gotta wonder about some people. I thought I was good at fake arguments! (ie: MAKING SHIT UP!)

Batman... Batman... Can somebody tell me what kind of a world we live in, where a man dressed up as a BAT gets all of my press?
This comment was edited on Sep 9, 10:16.
68.
 
Re: NanoTV
Sep 9, 2005, 10:11
68.
Re: NanoTV Sep 9, 2005, 10:11
Sep 9, 2005, 10:11
 
Yeah, it is, but you're absolutely right, democracy != majority rule. Which I'd also say is the case here.

What part of "the people voted no" don't you guys understand?
The lawmakers can't put into law something that the people obviously dont' want.

Like I said, but it to a vote at the ballot box and ride it out. What happens in the state of Cali will happen.

Batman... Batman... Can somebody tell me what kind of a world we live in, where a man dressed up as a BAT gets all of my press?
67.
 
Re: No subject
Sep 9, 2005, 09:18
67.
Re: No subject Sep 9, 2005, 09:18
Sep 9, 2005, 09:18
 
THe SRBs burn solid fuel and aren't as clean.

Specifically, ammonium perchlorate and aluminum (plus other gunk -- the most "natural" stuff involved is iron oxide, aka rust, as a catalyst. It's also the least by weight). Do not taunt ammonium perchlorate. Do not use welding torches near it, unless you like setting off an explosion that measures 3.5 on the Richter scale (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PEPCON_disaster)

I had no idea that the SRBs had vectored thrust though... those hydraulics must be huge.

66.
 
Re: NanoTV
Sep 9, 2005, 09:06
66.
Re: NanoTV Sep 9, 2005, 09:06
Sep 9, 2005, 09:06
 
I support the Gov in his pending veto because of that, regardless of how I personally feel about the issue.

Well said. Although I did find the governor's statement about it needing to be resolved "by court decision or another vote of the people of our state", given all the whinging about "judicial activism" by neo-cons.

I'm completely unfamiliar with California's constitution so I have no idea what the legal status of a Proposition is vs a legislative bill. I'd guess that the proposition carries greater weight though.

65.
 
Re: Pandora
Sep 9, 2005, 08:41
Jim
65.
Re: Pandora Sep 9, 2005, 08:41
Sep 9, 2005, 08:41
Jim
 
s it just me, but is the new iPod Nano really quite cool? If I didn't have a Shuffle already, I'd be sorely tempted

I thougt the same thing. I have a 15bg gen 3 ipod (or was it gen 2- it still has the 4 buttons and no click wheel) and would definately consider the nano if I didn't already have a pod.

Did you see the ad for it during the game last night?

Jim
64.
 
Re: No subject
Sep 9, 2005, 07:23
Jim
64.
Re: No subject Sep 9, 2005, 07:23
Sep 9, 2005, 07:23
Jim
 
correct me if i'm wrong, but isn't most of that 'smoke' from the SRBs just mostly water vapor? i mean, aren't the SRBs fueled by liquid hydrogen and oxygen?

Water vapor is what comes out of the main engines. THe SRBs burn solid fuel and aren't as clean.

Jim
63.
 
Re: Pandora
Sep 9, 2005, 06:47
63.
Re: Pandora Sep 9, 2005, 06:47
Sep 9, 2005, 06:47
 
Is it just me, but is the new iPod Nano really quite cool? If I didn't have a Shuffle already, I'd be sorely tempted

___________________________________
If I had a dollar for every time I had sixty cents, I'd be Canada
Avatar 18712
62.
 
pandora
Sep 9, 2005, 06:44
62.
pandora Sep 9, 2005, 06:44
Sep 9, 2005, 06:44
 
yeh it acknowledges some weird stuff... like minor or major key tonality

too bad its not free.. i could really get into a music search engine like that

________________________
music from space captain:
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/6/errantways_music.htm
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/4/invisibleacropolis_music.htm
61.
 
Re: Pandora
Sep 9, 2005, 04:17
61.
Re: Pandora Sep 9, 2005, 04:17
Sep 9, 2005, 04:17
 
I found that i like melancholic guitar music..

who knew?

60.
 
Re: NanoTV
Sep 9, 2005, 00:16
60.
Re: NanoTV Sep 9, 2005, 00:16
Sep 9, 2005, 00:16
 
Edit: And the state of California, specifically, is modeled after the federal gov'mint...

Except for the fact (you have convienently left out) that California also has the system in place for people to put ballot initiatives up for a vote to be decided directly by the people. Prop 22 a few years ago decided this issue. I support the Gov in his pending veto because of that, regardless of how I personally feel about the issue.


*** Warhawk ***

What's the plan?

Rescue the damsel in distress, kill the bad guy, save the world.

Have I lied to you? I mean, in this room? Trust me, leave that thing alone. - GLaDOS

Did IQs just drop sharply while I was away? - Ripley
59.
 
Re: NanoTV
Sep 8, 2005, 23:47
Prez
 
59.
Re: NanoTV Sep 8, 2005, 23:47
Sep 8, 2005, 23:47
 Prez
 
"Democracy is two wolves and one sheep deciding what's for dinner."

Can't remember whose quote that is. Anyone?

“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Avatar 17185
58.
 
Re: NanoTV
Sep 8, 2005, 22:57
Enahs
 
58.
Re: NanoTV Sep 8, 2005, 22:57
Sep 8, 2005, 22:57
 Enahs
 
considering our bicamiral (sp?) legislature.

I think the spelling you are looking for is actually bi-criminal.


That's not a toy! “ –Frylock, “You say that about everything you own. You should own toys. They're fun.” –MasterShake.
I am free of all prejudice. I hate everyone equally.
- W. C. Fields
Avatar 15513
57.
 
Re: NanoTV
Sep 8, 2005, 22:05
57.
Re: NanoTV Sep 8, 2005, 22:05
Sep 8, 2005, 22:05
 
Yeah, it is, but you're absolutely right, democracy != majority rule. Which I'd also say is the case here.

I hate to be the idiot that can't drop an argument on-line, but America is not a democracy. It's a federalist republic. Or, if you really want to stretch the word democracy it's a 'representational democracy', but even that really isn't the case, considering our bicamiral (sp?) legislature. Had America been a true representational democracy Dubya wouldn't have gotten his first term in office, but we're not.. so here we are.

Edit: And the state of California, specifically, is modeled after the federal gov'mint...


This comment was edited on Sep 8, 22:06.
I eat pasta!
56.
 
No subject
Sep 8, 2005, 20:51
56.
No subject Sep 8, 2005, 20:51
Sep 8, 2005, 20:51
 
Oh gosh. I'm an idiot.

Nevermind.


http://citizenb.com/ - Shameless website plug.
There are things that drift away like our endless, numbered days
This comment was edited on Sep 8, 20:55.
Who knows but that, on the lower frequencies, I speak for you?
http://citizenb.com/ - Now at v1.1
55.
 
Re: Patrick Bateman:
Sep 8, 2005, 20:42
Prez
 
55.
Re: Patrick Bateman: Sep 8, 2005, 20:42
Sep 8, 2005, 20:42
 Prez
 
Go Giants! Go Jets! Play that mediocre football!!!!

“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Avatar 17185
54.
 
Patrick Bateman:
Sep 8, 2005, 20:30
54.
Patrick Bateman: Sep 8, 2005, 20:30
Sep 8, 2005, 20:30
 
"Dont just stare at it , EAT IT !"


.

"Its a small world.....but I wouldnt want to paint it"
Avatar 14092
53.
 
Re: No subject
Sep 8, 2005, 20:29
53.
Re: No subject Sep 8, 2005, 20:29
Sep 8, 2005, 20:29
 
correct me if i'm wrong, but isn't most of that 'smoke' from the SRBs just mostly water vapor? i mean, aren't the SRBs fueled by liquid hydrogen and oxygen?

52.
 
Re: No subject
Sep 8, 2005, 20:06
52.
Re: No subject Sep 8, 2005, 20:06
Sep 8, 2005, 20:06
 
Well I say... Go Seahawks!!

YES!!!

Got tickets to the home opener on the 18th!


I like Pop Tarts

This comment was edited on Sep 8, 20:08.
There's no place like 127.0.0.1
71 Replies. 4 pages. Viewing page 1.
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