U.S. Army Stays Unreal

The U.S. Army announces they have licensed the Unreal Engine 3 to power the next version of the America's Army shooter, just as the first America's Army game was built upon a previous version of Epic's Unreal tech. Here's the plan:
West Point, NY May10, 2005 The U.S. Army today announced that it is expanding its technology agreement with Epic Games. Since 2000, Epic's Unreal. Engine 2 has served as the foundation for America's Army, the Official U.S. Army Game. To take advantage of leap-ahead capabilities afforded by Epic Games' newest engine, the Army will begin developing its next generation versions of America's Army on the Unreal Engine 3. in the coming months.

"The Unreal Engine has enabled us to develop one of the most popular games in the world. At the same time, the Unreal Engine has provided us the power and flexibility to develop revolutionary training and education applications for use across the government," said Colonel Casey Wardynski, project director and originator of the "America's Army" concept. "The gameplay, environments and immersive action generated using Unreal Engine 3 will allow us to create ever more realistic scenarios and environments through which young adults can learn about Soldiering and through which Soldiers can master skills ranging from lifesaving to countering IEDs in the Global War on Terrorism."

The America's Army game (www.americasarmy.com) has placed Soldiering into popular culture by providing young adults the means to explore key Soldier lifecycle experiences from basic training to operations in the Global War on Terrorism. Since the America's Army game launched, gamers have completed more than 1.34 billion missions and 94 million hours virtually exploring progressive developmental experiences ranging from basic training to the Special Forces Qualification Course. Upcoming versions of the game include America's Army: Special Forces Overmatch, which will release this fall; and America's Army: Stryker-Overmatch to be released this winter.

By harnessing the power of the Unreal Engine, America's Army produces extraordinarily engaging and realistic environments and experiences. As a result, a wide variety of agencies from the U.S. Navy to national laboratories have repurposed America's Army for applications ranging from appended training devices for weapon systems to adaptive thinking and leadership
training simulations.

"Our relationship with the Army has proven that Unreal Engine 3's flexibility, versatility and wide array of features can be deployed for greater purposes beyond traditional gaming," said Mark Rein, vice president of Epic
Games. "We are delighted that our technology is supporting the Army in achieving its mission of showcasing the Army and helping to drive the America's Army game series to new levels. It's also really exciting for us to see how our technology can be used to help the Army prepare its Soldiers for the challenges they confront in real-life scenarios."
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No subject
May 10, 2005, 18:19
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No subject May 10, 2005, 18:19
May 10, 2005, 18:19
 
The America's Army game (www.americasarmy.com) has placed Soldiering into popular culture by providing young adults the means to explore key Soldier lifecycle experiences from basic training to operations in the Global War on Terrorism.

I can't wait till they can actually let me experience the pain of losing a limb or being permanently disabled for life! Now that's realism! Maybe in the next version they'll send family members simulated letters informing them of my death in action, too. God this shit is disturbing.

---------
Pandora Studios programmer
http://www.pandora-studios.com
2.
 
No subject
May 10, 2005, 18:22
2.
No subject May 10, 2005, 18:22
May 10, 2005, 18:22
 
This is what happens when you have a neverending supply of taxpayer dollars. Imagine the kind of game quality that would be possible if an experienced development house had such inexaustible revenue stream (the america's army developers are not experienced and if you played the early versions of america's army you would realize that).

I guess this is the Army's way of trying anything and everything to help meet recruiting goals.

In this press release they say that they use this game to train their soldiers. I feel sorry for the people that are trained in life and death battles using a video game.

And if they really realistic they should add some gore. Things like shrapnel wounds, amputations, blood, but that's never going to happen, because those things don't serve to help recruit new members. The truth of war doesn't help meet recruiting goals.

Now that the army has taken extraordinary step to temporarily halt all recruiting because of all the recruiting scandals where recruiters threatened potential recruits with arrest if they didn't show up to appointments, filling out fraudulant recruiting test forms, telling recruiters how to get fradulent high school diplomas and other things, all in order to tell their recruiters what things they can and can't legally do to get new recruits.

This comment was edited on May 10, 18:49.
3.
 
Re: No subject
May 10, 2005, 18:37
3.
Re: No subject May 10, 2005, 18:37
May 10, 2005, 18:37
 
God this shit is disturbing
I disagree. Almost all other video games which deal with war and combat glorify it. It's killing without consequences and without experiencing the horrors of war, and that deceives and desensitizes players to what war is really like.

Given that the Army uses its games to attract recruits, being too realistic will ironically have the opposite effect. If the Army gets too realistic with its games, it will have a harder time convincing young people to "play army" for real.

4.
 
Unreal 3 for free = good
May 10, 2005, 18:40
4.
Unreal 3 for free = good May 10, 2005, 18:40
May 10, 2005, 18:40
 
I am glad that the Army is using the Unreal 3 engine for its next version of the game because it will make a game which uses the latest in gaming technology available for free.

5.
 
Re: No subject
May 10, 2005, 18:41
5.
Re: No subject May 10, 2005, 18:41
May 10, 2005, 18:41
 
QUOTE:
I can't wait till they can actually let me experience the pain of losing a limb or being permanently disabled for life! Now that's realism! Maybe in the next version they'll send family members simulated letters informing them of my death in action, too. God this shit is disturbing.
END QUOTE:

Now lets think this through once, is this any more disturbing than lets say:

-Killing cops and running over pedestrians? (GTA's)
-Raising a civilization just to slaughter them in sacrifice to further your own power? (Black and White)
-Killing races of creatures just because they are not human to increase your power? ( just about any RPG)
-Building a city of millions just so you can destroy it by fire, floods, and earthquakes? ( SimCities).

To say that America's Army is any more disturbing than anything else out there is just being plain ignorant of the world you live in and the games you play.

This comment was edited on May 10, 18:44.
6.
 
Re: No subject
May 10, 2005, 18:45
6.
Re: No subject May 10, 2005, 18:45
May 10, 2005, 18:45
 
It's probably going to still play the same in the new version, just with better graphics.

Avatar 571
7.
 
Re: No subject
May 10, 2005, 18:46
7.
Re: No subject May 10, 2005, 18:46
May 10, 2005, 18:46
 
Sorry for the people that train in a video game? Would you rather them train with flour artillery, and against dummies? Or waste MORE taxpayer dollars on ammo, which is already short? Or do you really want them to lose limbs in training? Please, educate me.

As far as gore, what do you expect? They want to keep a T rating for one, and two, WHY SHOULD THEY SHOW STUFF THAT WOULD HURT THEIR CAUSE? If you're trying to sell something, are you going to show all the bad parts?

Every civilization has their propaganda. This is one of them. And at least this is enjoyable, rather than BUY WAR BONDS! posters. I'm going to keep playing AA, regardless of what the popular skeptic thinks.

edit: Apparently most of my points have been beaten to - start reading and there are 2 messages. I've not lost faith in the human race yet reading some of the responses, kudos for those who also saw some of the blatant stupidity.

This comment was edited on May 10, 18:50.
8.
 
Re: No subject
May 10, 2005, 19:01
8.
Re: No subject May 10, 2005, 19:01
May 10, 2005, 19:01
 
I feel sorry for the people that are trained in life and death battles using a video game.

Now you sound like the idiots who think games 'teach our kids how to kill!' The army doesn't use games to show soldiers how to point and fire a weapon. The games are used to practice strategy and tactics, where to move and when, how to move and cover, etc. Games don't teach them the technical details of killing a person.

On another topic, Epic must be making a bundle on all these licences.

9.
 
Re: No subject
May 10, 2005, 19:07
Sty
9.
Re: No subject May 10, 2005, 19:07
May 10, 2005, 19:07
Sty
 
In this press release they say that they use this game to train their soldiers. I feel sorry for the people that are trained in life and death battles using a video game.

It's used to accent training, not exclusively.

*Edit* - Squirmer beat me to it.

_________________________________________________
F is for fire that burns down the whole town
U is for uranium bombs
N is for no survivors
...when you're having FUN!
This comment was edited on May 10, 19:08.
You know selling dlc before you patch the client doesn't impress upon me the need to support your shit. -massdev
Avatar 13874
10.
 
Re: No subject
May 10, 2005, 19:14
10.
Re: No subject May 10, 2005, 19:14
May 10, 2005, 19:14
 
I should get a damn tax refund for this BS

11.
 
"Now that's realism! "
May 10, 2005, 19:25
11.
"Now that's realism! " May 10, 2005, 19:25
May 10, 2005, 19:25
 
I find it oddly funny how literal the term Realism is, when being used by gamers. It is like we all of a sudden forgot virtual reality. Which is what games are more or less like. It is all about the ability to suck people in.... suspend their disbelief and draw them deeper into the game world. Simple really.

Gamers should instinctively know this. But still ya got whney little peeps saying if ya want realism, join the army. hahahahaha

12.
 
No subject
May 10, 2005, 19:25
Tim
12.
No subject May 10, 2005, 19:25
May 10, 2005, 19:25
Tim
 
The first installment was and still maintains to be the secret vice of many non Americans. I just checked the Americans Army website and it lists 5,254,879 registered users. There have been over 10,000 new players in the last 10 days and there are currently over 20,000 active servers today, all for a game that is in its 5th year of existence. It’s nice to see a game with backing; The United States Army is a stalwart lover for sure. How many times have you handed over 35 quid for a title and its developers have moved on to whatever it is they move on to, and your still waiting for a ‘will this make it not crash patch’?
If the United States Army really wants to tick people off they implement a system in which only United States citizens can register and play. After all, who’s to fault a company for going after its target demographic?
___________________
I'll sell your memories for fifty pounds per year.
13.
 
Not too good...
May 10, 2005, 19:39
13.
Not too good... May 10, 2005, 19:39
May 10, 2005, 19:39
 
"It's also really exciting for us to see how our technology can be used to help the Army prepare its Soldiers for the challenges they confront in real-life scenarios."
- So now the buying customers are accomplices in the "War against Terrororism and Evil"... That's Unreal for sure. In a bizarre way it makes sense... But what about the other way: Putting the Bush administration into the Unreal universe? My comment would be: "Its really exciting for me to see that the American oil industry can be used to help the Juggernauts prepare its Soldiers for the War Cows they confront in unreal scenarios."

14.
 
Re: Not too good...
May 10, 2005, 19:50
14.
Re: Not too good... May 10, 2005, 19:50
May 10, 2005, 19:50
 
Like I said before I feel sorry for the people who are trained using a video game. I know that they probably don't use this to teach people how to hold a gun etc. However video games aren't a good subsitute trainig for actual physical training on how to move and group tactics. Doing it is much better than playing it. And if I was a soldier and they were using America's army to teach me anything, I would find that disturbing.

15.
 
Re: Not too good...
May 10, 2005, 19:52
PHJF
 
15.
Re: Not too good... May 10, 2005, 19:52
May 10, 2005, 19:52
 PHJF
 
Fuck you assclowns, why don't you actually judge the game. America's Army has done a ton to improve on military shooters. AA has far better maps than any Rainbow Six title, and is without a doubt the most absorbing, rewarding, and mature multiplayer shooter around.

On top of that, it's about time something *useful* came out of tax dollars (oh wait, instead of America's Army we could have .5% of enough funds for ANOTHER pointless invasion in the middle east, god damn you America's Army!). They could have EASILY sold this game, if not for MSRP than budget priced, and it still would have developed the massive player base it has now. A good game is a good fucking game, and America's Army is a good fucking game.

------
“The closer you get to being a pro, the closer you can get to the client. The knife, for example, is the last thing you learn. Ok?"
Steam + PSN: PHJF
Avatar 17251
16.
 
Re: Not too good...
May 10, 2005, 19:58
16.
Re: Not too good... May 10, 2005, 19:58
May 10, 2005, 19:58
 
Like I said before I feel sorry for the people who are trained using a video game. I know that they probably don't use this to teach people how to hold a gun etc. However video games aren't a good subsitute trainig for actual physical training on how to move and group tactics. Doing it is much better than playing it. And if I was a soldier and they were using America's army to teach me anything, I would find that disturbing.

Uhh I'm sure it isn't used as a replacement for RL training, but mainly to suppliment it.

Dr. Michael Bolton's Hairdreser PhD, MD, LLP, DDS
17.
 
Re: Not too good...
May 10, 2005, 19:59
17.
Re: Not too good... May 10, 2005, 19:59
May 10, 2005, 19:59
 
Easy, War Clown. I WAS commenting upon the game. I just find it somewhat hilarious that the Game-War against Evil and Terrorism is "Powered by Unreal Technology". And Overon, I am not disturbed a bit. If the soldiers don't learn to hold the gun in the American Army game, they always have the instagib. If the server allows it, I mean... The Good Server.

This comment was edited on May 10, 20:00.
18.
 
Re: No subject
May 10, 2005, 20:00
18.
Re: No subject May 10, 2005, 20:00
May 10, 2005, 20:00
 
Now lets think this through once, is this any more disturbing than lets say:

-Killing cops and running over pedestrians? (GTA's)
-Raising a civilization just to slaughter them in sacrifice to further your own power? (Black and White)
-Killing races of creatures just because they are not human to increase your power? ( just about any RPG)
-Building a city of millions just so you can destroy it by fire, floods, and earthquakes? ( SimCities).

To say that America's Army is any more disturbing than anything else out there is just being plain ignorant of the world you live in and the games you play.

But of course none of those points you mentioned have anything to do with real life - people playing GTA aren't encouraged to go around cop killing once they've finished the game. With america's army they ARE encouraged to do what they've done in the game - only for real.

Tbh, I don't really have a problem with using a game as a recruitment tool, as long as the people who do sign up are fully aware of the consequencies, and aren't deluded into thinking that fighting in the army is some sort of "game".

- On a separate note: wp Epic games, it's nice to see such a talented developer enjoying success.

This comment was edited on May 10, 20:03.
19.
 
Re: No subject
May 10, 2005, 20:02
19.
Re: No subject May 10, 2005, 20:02
May 10, 2005, 20:02
 
I disagree. Almost all other video games which deal with war and combat glorify it. It's killing without consequences and without experiencing the horrors of war, and that deceives and desensitizes players to what war is really like.

Given that the Army uses its games to attract recruits, being too realistic will ironically have the opposite effect. If the Army gets too realistic with its games, it will have a harder time convincing young people to "play army" for real.

I'm sorry, but where in my post did i say "I don't understand why they are doing this. Someone please explain it to me." What i said is that it disturbs me that the army uses a "game" as a training and recruiting method, for, like you said, the purpose of convincing young people to "play army" for real. It then becomes a tool, not a game.

Part of training for war involves the preperation of the combatant for the harsh realities of death, amputation, chemical infection, bullet wounds, etc. They don't send you out on the real battlefield without the training needed to deal with such situations. Their target audience is younger players.. at or below the age of 18.. and they're only giving a partial (whitewashed) depiction of what war is. How on earth did it cross your brain that this isn't part of the "glorifying" that you spoke of? Their very own press release speaks of integrating Soldiering into pop culture. Soldiering should not be pop culture -- that's glorification. It should be a long, hard decision made by an informed individual. He or she should by no means be "tricked" into joining. So say what you will, but in my opinion i find it disturbing that so few these days are willing to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.

So help us...

---------
Pandora Studios programmer
http://www.pandora-studios.com
20.
 
Re: Not too good...
May 10, 2005, 20:06
20.
Re: Not too good... May 10, 2005, 20:06
May 10, 2005, 20:06
 
I feel sorry for the people that are trained in life and death battles using a video game.

However video games aren't a good subsitute trainig for actual physical training on how to move and group tactics.

Right and that's why it's not a substitute but instead a supplement. Training in the field takes a hell of a lot of planning and forethought, so it can't happen all the time. During peacetime on a given Army post 1/3 of the soldiers will be running the post, 1/3 will be in the field training and 1/3 will be on standby ready to deploy on a moments notice. For the 2/3s of the post who are not in the field some computer simulations are a great way to SUPPLEMENT the field training. If you think that is bad, I feel sorry for YOU.

This comment was edited on May 10, 20:09.
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