U.S. Army Stays Unreal

The U.S. Army announces they have licensed the Unreal Engine 3 to power the next version of the America's Army shooter, just as the first America's Army game was built upon a previous version of Epic's Unreal tech. Here's the plan:
West Point, NY May10, 2005 The U.S. Army today announced that it is expanding its technology agreement with Epic Games. Since 2000, Epic's Unreal. Engine 2 has served as the foundation for America's Army, the Official U.S. Army Game. To take advantage of leap-ahead capabilities afforded by Epic Games' newest engine, the Army will begin developing its next generation versions of America's Army on the Unreal Engine 3. in the coming months.

"The Unreal Engine has enabled us to develop one of the most popular games in the world. At the same time, the Unreal Engine has provided us the power and flexibility to develop revolutionary training and education applications for use across the government," said Colonel Casey Wardynski, project director and originator of the "America's Army" concept. "The gameplay, environments and immersive action generated using Unreal Engine 3 will allow us to create ever more realistic scenarios and environments through which young adults can learn about Soldiering and through which Soldiers can master skills ranging from lifesaving to countering IEDs in the Global War on Terrorism."

The America's Army game (www.americasarmy.com) has placed Soldiering into popular culture by providing young adults the means to explore key Soldier lifecycle experiences from basic training to operations in the Global War on Terrorism. Since the America's Army game launched, gamers have completed more than 1.34 billion missions and 94 million hours virtually exploring progressive developmental experiences ranging from basic training to the Special Forces Qualification Course. Upcoming versions of the game include America's Army: Special Forces Overmatch, which will release this fall; and America's Army: Stryker-Overmatch to be released this winter.

By harnessing the power of the Unreal Engine, America's Army produces extraordinarily engaging and realistic environments and experiences. As a result, a wide variety of agencies from the U.S. Navy to national laboratories have repurposed America's Army for applications ranging from appended training devices for weapon systems to adaptive thinking and leadership
training simulations.

"Our relationship with the Army has proven that Unreal Engine 3's flexibility, versatility and wide array of features can be deployed for greater purposes beyond traditional gaming," said Mark Rein, vice president of Epic
Games. "We are delighted that our technology is supporting the Army in achieving its mission of showcasing the Army and helping to drive the America's Army game series to new levels. It's also really exciting for us to see how our technology can be used to help the Army prepare its Soldiers for the challenges they confront in real-life scenarios."
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67 Replies. 4 pages. Viewing page 1.
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67.
 
Re: hmmmmm
May 12, 2005, 20:19
Prez
 
67.
Re: hmmmmm May 12, 2005, 20:19
May 12, 2005, 20:19
 Prez
 
The enemy is always the terrorist, which some people will read into as a deep message.

This was I assume to maintain a level of tastefulness. It wouldn't be appropriate to have an actual terrorist team, with nail bombs and suicide vests.

“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Avatar 17185
66.
 
Re: hmmmmm
May 12, 2005, 17:22
66.
Re: hmmmmm May 12, 2005, 17:22
May 12, 2005, 17:22
 
Both teams are the US Army. The enemy is always the terrorist, which some people will read into as a deep message. The missions are written for both sides.

65.
 
No subject
May 11, 2005, 18:00
Prez
 
65.
No subject May 11, 2005, 18:00
May 11, 2005, 18:00
 Prez
 
And they themselves told me, that they think anyone who would be truly proud of all that carnage seen and done to their fellow man.... is either showing the bravado expected of them, and lying. Or they have a screw loose.

Who would be proud of carnage? You are missing the point. It is a "solemn pride.... that comes from laying so costly a sacrifice at the alter of freedom..." (to paraphrase honest-Abe.)


“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Avatar 17185
64.
 
Re: hmmmmm
May 11, 2005, 16:05
64.
Re: hmmmmm May 11, 2005, 16:05
May 11, 2005, 16:05
 
Never played AA. Can you join the other team or do you have to play as the yanks? Is it like Wolfenstein where voice comms on the other team have comedy accents? Maybe scream commands like 'the infidels have taken the oil fields', or 'zay haff found za secret bunker'. That would rule.

63.
 
hmmmmm
May 11, 2005, 10:10
63.
hmmmmm May 11, 2005, 10:10
May 11, 2005, 10:10
 
"I've met very few vets that aren't insanely proud of what they did and how they helped shape the world"

I`ve met a few myself in Canada, and not a 1 of them is really proud of what they had to do. Oh they are proud they answered the call when their Country needed them. But they are not at all proud of what they had to do, and what they had to see.

And they themselves told me, that they think anyone who would be truly proud of all that carnage seen and done to their fellow man.... is either showing the bravado expected of them, and lying. Or they have a screw loose.



62.
 
Re: Could be worse..
May 11, 2005, 09:33
nin
62.
Re: Could be worse.. May 11, 2005, 09:33
May 11, 2005, 09:33
nin
 
..they coulda chosen the Doom3 engine. Then all the terrorists would be in cramped tunnels and they would all be grey.

And they'd all jump out of closets, the moment you turned your back...

If you look at your reflection, is that all you want to be? http://www.nin.com
61.
 
Could be worse..
May 11, 2005, 09:32
61.
Could be worse.. May 11, 2005, 09:32
May 11, 2005, 09:32
 
..they coulda chosen the Doom3 engine. Then all the terrorists would be in cramped tunnels and they would all be grey.

------
Carpe Papilla
------
Carpe Papilla

"@Dreagon - Comparing Oblivion to Deer Hunter was just ridiculous and you should be ashamed of yourself... it just made you look like a Class-A cunt." - theyarecomingforyou
60.
 
Re: It's more than a
May 11, 2005, 08:31
60.
Re: It's more than a May 11, 2005, 08:31
May 11, 2005, 08:31
 
That's a very good idea, Jensen. I honestly think The American Army is even morally obliged to do it that way. Its the only remotely "realistic" way of presenting this war commersial. In fact, it would probably make me very interested in the game. It would be a whole new experience; actually having something to loose, dying when dying, instead of respawning, as if life was unreal.

This comment was edited on May 11, 08:32.
59.
 
No subject
May 11, 2005, 06:59
Prez
 
59.
No subject May 11, 2005, 06:59
May 11, 2005, 06:59
 Prez
 
The key point to understand is that the army never marketed this games as a true depiction of war. It was nothing more than recruitment advertising using a brand new (to them)kind of media. To attack the game for not simulating the horrible truth of war is akin to getting pissed off at every Hollywood movie for its inaccurate depictions of everything from fist-fights (no one ever gets infections when they skin their knuckles on another man's teeth) to sex (no one ever gets an STD or pregnant) Videogames and PC games are entertainment. If the idea of "playing" war makes someone uncomfortable I can understand that. War may not be a game, but that is all that America's Army will ever be.

“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Avatar 17185
58.
 
Re: It's more than a
May 11, 2005, 04:44
58.
Re: It's more than a May 11, 2005, 04:44
May 11, 2005, 04:44
 
Maybe they should make it so you can only play the game until your character dies, then you can never play again.
Then the game will be an acceptable form of advertisement.

57.
 
Re: It's more than a
May 11, 2005, 02:25
57.
Re: It's more than a May 11, 2005, 02:25
May 11, 2005, 02:25
 
I had a grandfather that happened to have the wrong color hair during the war. He lost 3 cousins as Nazi's swept down to the Sea. Took them, put them on a train, never seen again.

We could toss horrifics back and forth until hell freezes over. My family happened to have the wrong religion. You can imagine the stories i can tell.

My grandfather (mother's side of the family) was an American. He was drafted. There is one specific moment (although not the only one) that he recalled as 'the most horrible thing that he had ever done.' I don't want to tell this story, really, as my real name is easily available and it's something he considered private. But suffice it to say he was ordered to do something that he had regretted following ever since. You can't say that everyone believes their life has improved -- that's an assumable fact, and my grandfather was living proof of that. If you believe that, you are lying to yourself, and i honestly don't know how you came up with that assumption. Have you interviewed every vet who ever lived? No. Only in your fractional microcosm does that seem to be true. But hey, believe what you want.

edit: Let's just agree to disagree shall we? You've got your stance and i've got mine. I say it all the time but this is the internet, and opinions rarely change here on account of the words of others.

---------
Pandora Studios programmer
http://www.pandora-studios.com
This comment was edited on May 11, 02:29.
56.
 
No subject
May 11, 2005, 02:10
56.
No subject May 11, 2005, 02:10
May 11, 2005, 02:10
 
<removed because my reply was superfluous by the time it was posted>
Blue, you need a delete post function for authors.
This comment was edited on May 11, 04:17.
55.
 
Re: It's more than a
May 11, 2005, 01:42
55.
Re: It's more than a May 11, 2005, 01:42
May 11, 2005, 01:42
 
I also don't get what the camping buddy and "ATTENTION!" is supposed to mean.

I had roommates in college that would fall asleep on the couch all the time. Any beeping would make their left hand flop over, as if reaching for a snooze alarm. Does this mean the college brainwashed him by making him get up for classes? Oh no, people resorting back to habits while asleep! Alert Pavlov!

edit:
I had a grandfather who fought in WW2 and he regretted it every day until he died.

Why, exactly?

I had a grandfather that happened to have the wrong color hair during the war. He lost 3 cousins as Nazi's swept down to the Sea. Took them, put them on a train, never seen again.

World War II was horrific. But the draft was necessary. I've met very few vets that aren't insanely proud of what they did and how they helped shape the world. I've met plenty that don't like to remember, don't like to talk about it, but are full of pride for the events they helped define and contributions they made.

If ever there was a noble cause, it was being a soldier in either of the world wars.

This comment was edited on May 11, 01:46.
54.
 
Re: It's more than a
May 11, 2005, 01:34
54.
Re: It's more than a May 11, 2005, 01:34
May 11, 2005, 01:34
 
also said you could ask anyone who served and they'd tell you how much it improved their lives -- you know that's a lie.

Everyone I've spoken with says it has. I have several friends there now, and I spent Thanksgiving with two former Air Force pilots. Both are not only commercial pilots now, but involved in part time consulting with NASA. Both are very angry that they're too old to be back in Iraq, having been there the first time.


Just because things are awful the way they doesn't mean that we should just sit around and go "yeah, that's just the way it is."

But that IS just the way it is with armed forces. It has its huge downsides. Many careers do. It comes with the territory. No one is forcing anyone to enlist, not in this generation. And no one is enlisting without understanding "war is hell."


If we were talking about a draft I'd certainly be on the side that people lose limbs, it's terrible. But right now we're talking voluntary enlistment. People are volunteering to put themselves at risk, and they're getting a great deal from it. No one is over in Iraq now that didn't choose to be. So, if you made that decision, well, war is awful, but you chose to be there. If you didn't want to be, you had other options.



I'm a big fan of something our country seems to hate - accepting responsibility. If you signed up to defend the country in the ways seen fit, accept the responsibility and do it. I'm no fan of this war, I'm no fan of the idiot in office, and I'm sure many fighting in his name agree, but very few got into this without knowing it was a very real possibility.
This comment was edited on May 11, 01:36.
53.
 
Re: It's more than a
May 11, 2005, 01:11
53.
Re: It's more than a May 11, 2005, 01:11
May 11, 2005, 01:11
 
I absolutely would not trivialize the actions of those who experienced something i could only imagine in my worst nightmares. When you see an old man cry while telling a story, it does something to you, though. And for that perhaps i am a bit biased... well, i really should stop posting on this topic. It gets me all riled

---------
Pandora Studios programmer
http://www.pandora-studios.com
52.
 
Re: It's more than a
May 11, 2005, 01:06
Prez
 
52.
Re: It's more than a May 11, 2005, 01:06
May 11, 2005, 01:06
 Prez
 
Yeah buddy, you touched a nerve. Don't assume anything about a person, ever.

Whoa, partner! If I offended you, I apologize. I'm glad you can relate to what I was saying. I was mostly trying to make the point that the sacrifices of these men should not be trivialized by assuming their lives all went to shit because of the army. A vast majority of injured vets I have spoken to are proud of their sacrifice and wear their injuries as badges of honor. Didn't mean to seem like I was trying to pigeon-hole you as un-appreciative.

As an aside, whether the vets believed in what they were doing or not, or whether they loved the Army or hated it- they all deserve our eternal thanks and respect.

This comment was edited on May 11, 01:12.
“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Avatar 17185
51.
 
Re: It's more than a
May 11, 2005, 01:01
Prez
 
51.
Re: It's more than a May 11, 2005, 01:01
May 11, 2005, 01:01
 Prez
 
Do you think they blow off recruits' limbs at boot camp just to "train" them what real battle is like? No, because an effective soldier isn't supposed to be sensitive to anything but his mission. That's the entire point. First person shooters, violent movies and what have you are doing exactly what they *should* be doing. It would hardly be helpful if a squadmate witnessed some grotesque act of war and responded by dropping prone and crying into the dirt. It's your job to do exactly what your superiors tell you, and nervous breakdowns on the field would hardly bolster a soldier's ability to do its job.

No amount of synthetic violence and combat will ever completely brainwash somebody into joining the armed forces just to get their gun off. People may be stupid, but when somebody joins the Army they know that they are going to try at all cost to kill the enemy and they know that the enemy is trying at all costs to kill them. No amount of propaganda, recruitment tools, or glorification of war is ever going to mask that simple truth. If somebody joins the Army with the intention of grabbing a rocket launcher and fragging as many tangos as heroicly as possible... well, he will get what he deserves.


This was such an intelligent and coherent argument that I posted it again. I could not have said it any better. Good job Professional!


“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Avatar 17185
50.
 
Re: It's more than a
May 11, 2005, 01:01
50.
Re: It's more than a May 11, 2005, 01:01
May 11, 2005, 01:01
 
You certainly implied that, among other things. You also said you could ask anyone who served and they'd tell you how much it improved their lives -- you know that's a lie. I mean, that whole post practically read like a military ad.. i have no problem mentioning the good things that the military does, but i do have a problem with people who don't mention the bad things the military does. And then try to excuse it all away with a "war is awful, live with it" line. Don't feed me that. I'm not hungry enough to eat bullshit. Just because things are awful the way they doesn't mean that we should just sit around and go "yeah, that's just the way it is." No, i'd rather sit around and say, "what the fuck is wrong with everyone?"

Some wars are necessary. Some aren't. The one America is in now arguably falls among the latter. Once again, we tread both sides of the line.

@Prez:
I'm fully aware of that. I had a grandfather who fought in WW2 and he regretted it every day until he died. I've lost friends in war. Some of them didn't want to be there. Some of them did. So don't you dare lecture me about this when not knowing my situation or what men i've personally walked among. You and i both know that there are people who fall under both of our categories. I don't ignore either, and nor should you. Yeah buddy, you touched a nerve. Don't assume anything about a person, ever.

---------
Pandora Studios programmer
http://www.pandora-studios.com
49.
 
Re: It's more than a
May 11, 2005, 00:51
Prez
 
49.
Re: It's more than a May 11, 2005, 00:51
May 11, 2005, 00:51
 Prez
 
...guys that lost the lower half of their bodies, should i ask them how much their lives have improved? Or the ones who have nightmares for 30 years that they can't quite seem to get rid of?

You know squirrel, I used to stop by the veteran's hospital by me in Seattle for at leat 2 hours a week. There are many men who reside there who fit your description - missing limbs, shattered mind, etc. Funny thing is, it was hard to find a bitter one in the bunch. Almost all of them were not only proud to have served, but would do it all over again. My advice - go to a vets hospital or vets home and visit with these men. It is an immensely humbling and sobering experience to walk among such giants of men.

“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Avatar 17185
48.
 
Re: It's more than a
May 11, 2005, 00:42
48.
Re: It's more than a May 11, 2005, 00:42
May 11, 2005, 00:42
 
Being in the armed forces does not automatically make you noble

I did not say that.

Nor does not being in the armed forces make you a "loser," nor does criticizing some of their questionable recruiting tactics make you a "loser."

I most certainly did not say that.

I simply said that, to many people, the Army has an image problem, that only the dregs of society go into it, that it's a point of no hope, and this is to combat that, to show that the Army has things to offer, that the Army has a sense of nobility. I never once said everyone in the army is noble, and I certainly didn't even imply that anyone not in it isn't noble.

I've never been near the armed forces. It isn't the life for me. I'm a greedy lawyer.


So do you really want me to start digging up resources of how many people's lives were destroyed by Agent Orange? Or guys that lost the lower half of their bodies, should i ask them how much their lives have improved? Or the ones who have nightmares for 30 years that they can't quite seem to get rid of? I could go on, but once again, the fact is, there are people on both sides of that line, my friend. To ignore this is to be a propagandist and a teller of half-truths.

Yes, horrible things happened. War is awful. War is also inevitable and a reality, and we need someone out there fighting it. Terrible? Yes. But we can't just say "war is bad, army is bad, bad things happen, we're not doing it anymore" and expect to have the same level of safety and quality of life we currently do.

That's not the way the world is.


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