Elixir Folds

This Elixir Press Release (thanks Frans) announces that the U.K.-based developer behind Evil Genius is ceasing day-to-day operations effective immediately, "and will seek the orderly sale and re-use of all its remaining assets and IP." Here's more:
Following the successful release of Evil Genius in October 2004, the Company has been working on a very innovative game for a major US software and games publisher for the past couple of years. This project was recently cancelled due to the perceived high-risk profile of the endeavour. Elixir also has a number of promising original prototypes at various stages of development but the Board of Directors feel that the current risk averse publishing climate, in the run up to the launch of next generation platforms, virtually precludes the signing of any original IP (which is not already part of a well-established franchise or license), without an unreasonably large strategic investment in the project by the developer themselves.

In light of the above, and the current financial and market conditions, the Directors have taken the decision to use a part of the cash resources held by the Company to treat its employees in a professional manner by paying redundancy packages to everyone and to allow an orderly wind-down of operations.
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21.
 
Re: Bye bye
Apr 29, 2005, 09:44
Rob
21.
Re: Bye bye Apr 29, 2005, 09:44
Apr 29, 2005, 09:44
Rob
 
Well, I’m sure you understand how software licensing works, but to make things clear to everyone, you don’t “own” software when you buy it. You are paying for a license to use it, the reason this is important is that I think many have the impression that buying a CD somehow makes the “ownership” more valid, it does not, it’s just a delivery medium for the software, which you do not own (technically, you own the plastic, but not what’s written on it, so if ownership of plastic is important…:)). I’m not sure what you imagine developers doing to screw over their customers (I don’t know what DRMing means), perhaps you can elaborate, but off the top of my head I can’t think of anything that wouldn’t do more harm to them than good. And as far as liquidating assets, yes, I can see that, but I seriously doubt any but the largest publishers are going to do all their licensing and purchasing in-house, so if the company folds the selling and such can continue on the provider’s system. If it is a large publisher and they do their selling or authentication in-house, then they’ll almost assuredly keep that portion going, because it’s continued revenue makes it an asset. If the provider doesn’t allow re-downloading purchased products, then treat them just like a publisher unwilling to replace damaged CDs and don’t buy from them. Again, all things considered, I still think it’s far more likely that the customer gets screwed from lost or damaged CDs then on-line delivery systems folding. I still think the majority of the people out there prefer CDs for one simple reason, they are conditioned to do so. I’m sure when the microwave was introduced many customers avoided it for similar reasons, they were conditioned to use stoves and burners, and likely had 100 reasons they were afraid of them which seemed logical at the time, but now seem pretty silly.

This comment was edited on Apr 29, 09:45.
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