Elixir Folds

This Elixir Press Release (thanks Frans) announces that the U.K.-based developer behind Evil Genius is ceasing day-to-day operations effective immediately, "and will seek the orderly sale and re-use of all its remaining assets and IP." Here's more:
Following the successful release of Evil Genius in October 2004, the Company has been working on a very innovative game for a major US software and games publisher for the past couple of years. This project was recently cancelled due to the perceived high-risk profile of the endeavour. Elixir also has a number of promising original prototypes at various stages of development but the Board of Directors feel that the current risk averse publishing climate, in the run up to the launch of next generation platforms, virtually precludes the signing of any original IP (which is not already part of a well-established franchise or license), without an unreasonably large strategic investment in the project by the developer themselves.

In light of the above, and the current financial and market conditions, the Directors have taken the decision to use a part of the cash resources held by the Company to treat its employees in a professional manner by paying redundancy packages to everyone and to allow an orderly wind-down of operations.
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17.
 
Re: Bye bye
Apr 29, 2005, 08:11
Rob
17.
Re: Bye bye Apr 29, 2005, 08:11
Apr 29, 2005, 08:11
Rob
 
How does the delivery method change the licensing agreement? If a company wants to screw you with their license agreement the fact that the software is burned onto a CD rather than downloaded isn't going to stop them. The only relevant difference between electronic and physical delivery is that CDs can have some copy protection (generally broken at release, of course). If the publisher wants to require internet authentication, then that’s their choice.

As far as multiplayer or authentication servers being shutdown due to companies folding, although it’s possible, it’ll hardly ever happen. Once a product is being sold online, there’s virtually no cost to keep it selling (unlike stocking 5000 retail outlets), and authentication servers are less expensive the less bandwidth they take (not that they’ll ever take that much). It’s simply unlikely that even with the developer folding that all selling and authentication would stop, since it’d take only a few sales per month to pay for the whole thing. In the end if the game is small, then simply don’t buy it if it’s using a dedicated online authentication system (which it likely won’t, it’ll likely implement a licensed authentication system, in which case you’re fine unless they fold). I have seen this issue forwarded all the time as a reason not to like online distribution, and it’s really stupid since it’s online authentication that’s the problem, online distribution does NOT have to work like Steam. Personally, I’m much more likely to lose or break a game’s CD before the company stops selling the game online, so I’d use online delivery much more if possible (since I could re-download my purchased game).


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