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Thanks Mike Martinez.

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Re: Sigh
Nov 30, 2004, 14:00
6.
Re: Sigh Nov 30, 2004, 14:00
Nov 30, 2004, 14:00
 
I've heard the 4000 limit before. I have also heard that at 4000 anti-aliasing becomes essentially pointless as well. The good news is that we are half way there for computers. I've rev'd mine up to 2000+ and could still see some jaggies, but I'd really have to look.

5.
 
NO RUSH!!!!
Nov 30, 2004, 12:50
5.
NO RUSH!!!! Nov 30, 2004, 12:50
Nov 30, 2004, 12:50
 
I think pushing this format out the door too soon will be a disaster. Dvd's are fine right now- no need to replace them. So really the only limitation on the current dvd's is that you can't have DTS sound- without some loss of picture quality- due to limited space on a dvd. The only other reason to upgraded is if u have HDTV- wait to HDTV becomes more mainsteam before u launch.

4.
 
Re: Sigh
Nov 30, 2004, 12:00
4.
Re: Sigh Nov 30, 2004, 12:00
Nov 30, 2004, 12:00
 
And, when they say High Definition, what format are they talking about? 780p, 1080i?

I'm not sure that's been finalized yet. The HD spec wars have been all about the physical format so far -- Blu-ray vs HD-DVD. Looks like HD-DVD is going to win (which is probably good -- particularly for computers; there's a lot higher data density available on HD-DVD IIRC).

If they were consumer friendly they'd make it 1080p and have either the player or display downrez as appropriate.

If they're company friendly then it'll allow either 720p or 1080i. That leaves a nice upgrade path to 1080p or higher in the next decade.

FWIW, the best film->digital conversion process uses 4096 lines of resolution. That's pretty well accepted as the absolute limit for film resolution, and is well beyond the resolution available for a lot of film. So if you want to think pie-in-the-sky, then ask for a media that can do 4096p. Then you'll be good until we go holographic/3D. It won't be HD-DVD or Bluray though; they don't have the bandwidth or the storage capacity. It'd probably take an ultraviolet laser for that kind of density. That or holographic storage media.

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Re: Sigh
Nov 30, 2004, 10:43
3.
Re: Sigh Nov 30, 2004, 10:43
Nov 30, 2004, 10:43
 
Ya, I'm aware of that. But, in say 4 years when I actually might have a high definition TV and player, I might want to get some of my collection in HD when they re-release them, but I will try to resist.

DVD -> DVD special editions -> HD-DVD -> HD-DVD special editions.

The madness!

2.
 
Re: Sigh
Nov 30, 2004, 09:24
nin
 
2.
Re: Sigh Nov 30, 2004, 09:24
Nov 30, 2004, 09:24
 nin
 
Well, I'm not buying my DVD collection over again that's for sure.

Good news for you, then. Both Blu-Ray and HD-DVD are fully backwards compatable with the current dvd spec...meaning any new player will be able to play your "old" dvds...

I don't care what they do, as long as they stay backwards compatable...once there's a clear leader and it's worth the upgrade, THEN I'll think about buying in...



http://tds.nin.com/
1.
 
Sigh
Nov 30, 2004, 09:16
1.
Sigh Nov 30, 2004, 09:16
Nov 30, 2004, 09:16
 
Is this the last format for a while now? I haven't heard of anything beyond HD-DVD, but who knows. Maybe super-HD will be right around the corner. Well, I'm not buying my DVD collection over again that's for sure. And, when they say High Definition, what format are they talking about? 780p, 1080i? So now what? We have blu-ray/HD-DVD/780p/1080i. A standard has to fall out of this. My vote is for HD-DVD/780p. :/

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