Out of the Blue

Happy March 23, 2023, a delightfully palindromic number in U.S. format, where it is written 3/23/23. And although this M/D/Y format is uncommon in the rest of the world, we're in luck. The European Y/M/D notation for today is 23/3/23, which is also a palindrome. At least if you count the slashes, which we're allowed to do, since we're making up the rules here. There's a third way to skin this cat, as the British English way to express today's date is also 23/3/23. This reads the same as the European style, even though it uses its own D/M/Y date format. If it's too late to arrange any big parties for the occasion, there's plenty of advance warning to prepare for next year's April 24th festivities.

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5.
 
Re: OotB: Madam I'm Adam
Mar 23, 2023, 18:15
fds
5.
Re: OotB: Madam I'm Adam Mar 23, 2023, 18:15
Mar 23, 2023, 18:15
fds
 
Xil wrote on Mar 23, 2023, 15:21:
Being European, not British, is have never seen anyone here use anything else then d/m/y.
So not sure where in Europe the y/m/d is used?

Indeed, a year-month-day order is very rare in Europe: only Hungary uses it. Other than for food packaging, that is, since EU-wide rules mandate best before dates to be printed d/m/y everywhere. Japan also follows this eminently logical order, as do people speaking SQL.
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 Re: OotB: Madam I'm Adam
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