PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans

A post on the DirectX Developer Blog discusses DirectStorage, a new feature coming to NVMe SSD-equipped Windows PCs to "introduce a new era of no-compromise gameplay" (thanks Simon). They explain further: "With a DirectStorage capable PC and a DirectStorage enabled game, you can look forward to vastly reduced load times and virtual worlds that are more expansive and detailed than ever." They say that they are currently working with industry partners to finish designing the API and they hope to distribute a development preview of DirectStorage to game developers next year. They offer some technical details on how this will work and the following overview:
Unfortunately, current storage APIs were not optimized for this high number of IO requests, preventing them from scaling up to these higher NVMe bandwidths creating bottlenecks that limit what games can do. Even with super-fast PC hardware and an NVMe drive, games using the existing APIs will be unable to fully saturate the IO pipeline leaving precious bandwidth on the table.

That’s where DirectStorage for PC comes in. This API is the response to an evolving storage and IO landscape in PC gaming. DirectStorage will be supported on certain systems with NVMe drives and work to bring your gaming experience to the next level. If your system doesn’t support DirectStorage, don’t fret; games will continue to work just as well as they always have.
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34.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 3, 2020, 09:50
34.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 3, 2020, 09:50
Sep 3, 2020, 09:50
 
Muscular Beaver wrote on Sep 3, 2020, 09:27:
VaranDragon wrote on Sep 3, 2020, 02:49:
Oh gooodie....

Now we can look forward to even MORE game developers being lazy with smart memory usage, and even more stupid memory leak bugs etc.

I remember when games had to make do with 640kb of RAM. People made pretty great shit with low ram requirements, things most devs would look at as impossible now.

I also remember spending more time freeing enough of those 640 kb of RAM, than playing the game itself.

Oh common, it was nowhere near as bad as that! A config.sys line here, an autoexec.bat line there, and presto. You can play Doom. Mind you, no Lag, no memory leaks, no real slowdown due to I/O issues.
Avatar 58327
33.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 3, 2020, 09:30
33.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 3, 2020, 09:30
Sep 3, 2020, 09:30
 
Sepharo wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 23:22:
Slick wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 23:08:
maddog wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 18:29:
Slick wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 16:06:
Cutter wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 15:39:
Nah, I was just thinking in terms of another 'thing' trotted out that may never really get utilized like Intel's MMX.

I remember being so hyped when I got a P1 w/ MMX back in the day. SO FUNKY!

What about the "turbo" button on my 486. Not quite sure what that thing did.

DUDE! I remember those! A friend of mine had one with a clock-like LED display that went from 33 to 66 when you hit the turbo button. Were we able to overclock 200% clock speeds with a physical button? DID THAT HAPPEN? Or am I crazy? I was pretty young at the time.

A lot of PCs had that in the Win '95 days.
A hardware switch that overclocked and increased fan speeds.

Edit: I love wikipedia, an article for seemingly everything
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbo_button

Interesting that it contradicts my memory... Says rarely used with Pentiums, but that's the only thing I ever saw them on as a kid myself. I guess I was too young for noticing the earlier usages.
Also, interesting that its actual/original purpose was to slow computers down so they could play old games... Turbo ON was the default apparently.

I actually used it a few times, when I played games that were simply running too fast because they were too old.
So it really wasnt as useless as most think.
I have given up on waiting for BIS to come back to their senses and do a real ArmA 2 successor.
Avatar 12928
32.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 3, 2020, 09:27
32.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 3, 2020, 09:27
Sep 3, 2020, 09:27
 
VaranDragon wrote on Sep 3, 2020, 02:49:
Oh gooodie....

Now we can look forward to even MORE game developers being lazy with smart memory usage, and even more stupid memory leak bugs etc.

I remember when games had to make do with 640kb of RAM. People made pretty great shit with low ram requirements, things most devs would look at as impossible now.

I also remember spending more time freeing enough of those 640 kb of RAM, than playing the game itself.
I have given up on waiting for BIS to come back to their senses and do a real ArmA 2 successor.
Avatar 12928
31.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 3, 2020, 06:24
31.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 3, 2020, 06:24
Sep 3, 2020, 06:24
 
Not sure it's as simple as that, as the whole thing still has to work on CPU cycles, you could probably remove some overhead but it's not like each thing can function independently of every other thing. You're still gonna be limited by the slowest part of your system no matter how you look at it.
Avatar 58327
30.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 3, 2020, 06:12
30.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 3, 2020, 06:12
Sep 3, 2020, 06:12
 
Burrito of Peace wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 22:55:
RedEye9 wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 18:36:
I'm not going to get that technical because it would hurt my head and I wouldn't understand it anyways, but don't you start running into an issue with the number of lanes if you have a mongo GPU along with 3 or more nvme drives all vying for the same freeway?

With current systems, yes. I don't give a flying fuck about Intel because they are so far behind so I'll focus on AMD. Current gen 3000 Ryzen systems can support up to 20 lanes (technically 24 but 4 are dedicated to the chipset interconnect so they're non-addressable). However, current gen EPYC CPUs give you 128 lanes per processor. It is not implausible to assume that future platforms within the next 1-5 years will gain some of EPYC's tech and provide more lanes than what is currently available. Most likely due to the future demands of GPUs and storage. We always see server tech filter down to desktops. Multigig NICs, for example.

//----\\

eRe4s3r wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 20:53:
I give you a neat hint: Pci-E extension cards for NVMe to PCI-E, cost about $15

You probably should check what games are sized at nowadays ^^ Because RAM DISK isn't a solution to anything. Ram is precious, and also should never be involved in LOADING something to the GPU but that's another issue.

Yeah, an add-in card that takes up a slot unnecessarily and disrupts airflow. I'll pass.

I am well aware of what games are sized at nowadays. The super huge ones are outliers, not median average. A random sample of game sizes I have currently installed:
Control Ultimate Edition - 42GB
Wasteland 3 - 37.8GB
Guild Wars 2 -47.6GB

For the sake of whole numbers, I rounded W3 and GW2 up to the nearest whole number which gives me a mean average of 43GB (again, rounded up to the nearest whole number).

I have VMs and video files that are larger than that.

A ramdisk is very much a solution to many applications. Hell, I have run whole OSes out of ramdisks with desktop environments and applications installed. They're also awesome for cache pools for DB transactions, write caches, read caches, data streaming pools between cluster nodes, etc. Data is just data. Also, in no way is RAM "precious" unless you're using some shithole OS like Windows which has its head shoved way up its ass in how it handles memory. Even monetarily, it isn't precious. I can deck out a system with 64GB of ECC DDR4 3200 RAM for $452USD. It wasn't that long ago that I would spend five times as much on half that much RAM.

Even so, the GPU is almost irrelevant in terms of external transfer speed because data doesn't magically leap off a disk straight to the GPU. It has to go through an engine which is largely processed by the CPU which is a sequential processing unit. We kind of cheat with multiple cores but few games are genuinely multithreaded to the point where processing threads in parallel actually achieves a substantive difference. Let's take our 32GB of ECC RAM. It's maximum theoretical transfer rate is 25GB/s. However, that's not indicative of actual, real world transfer because there's a whole bunch of things going on in the backend that is going to cut that down. So let's be optimistic and say 20GB/s. The fastest NVMe on the planet's maximum theoretical sequential read speed is 6.5GB/s and that NVMe (the Samsung 980 Pro) hasn't even seen the light of day yet. But wait, there's more! The PCI-e 4.0 spec states that an x4 configuration has a theoretical maximum of 8GB/s. So let's quadruple that for an x16 configuration and say the maximum theoretical limit is 32GB/s. Even on its best day, the fastest NVMe on the planet isn't going to be able to max out PCI-e 4,0's theoretical limit at its theoretical limit. What comes closest to filling that pipe the fastest is a ramdisk backed by ECC memory. BUT...we forgot a small detail. We need to deduct around 10% of the RAM's speed because, of course, ECC. So that drops it down to a real world speed of around 18GB/s. Which is bigger? A theoretical maximum of 6.5GB/s or a real world maximum of 18GB/s? And that's all just a really simplified view of just transfer rate. It doesn't take in to account loads of things like preemptive interrupts which is going to degrade speed even further. Things that are going to hit the NVMe a lot harder since it is further down the bus than the RAM.

RAM is there to be used, period. If it's not being used to at least 85% of capacity, it's wasted money and electricity.

It's reply worthy only because you managed to write such an insanely good and well written explanation for SERVERS and their loading and ram and IO requirements, and yet you managed to miss the mark on how games and their engines actually work. A ram disk is never going to give you ANY speed or loading advantage in games. Because RAM DISK gives you CPU overhead which is the actual limiting factor, not throughput, NVME + this new GPU feature will eliminate the CPU bottleneck for NVME <-> GPU transfers. And that means a full 16x pci-e lane for loading with NO cpu overhead. Which is superior, in every instance, to anything you can have on Linux with Ram Disks (or even on Windows, a ramdisk is ALWAYS incuring a CPU overhead penalty)

Not to mention if you played ACTUAL AAA titles you'd know that they are not "43gb on average" ;p Fallout 4 has 90gb (without mods, those come on top) Warhammer 2 has 61GB and many other modern games go way beyond that, like Destiny 2, Horizon Zero Dawn, Red Dead Redemption 2...... a SSD is always going the be the superior choice for game loads. If you could avoid going through the RAM and eleminate any CPU/RAM dependency games could already run way faster than they do now too, because again. CPU = Bottleneck, Not your bandwidth throughput on the PCI-E lanes.
Avatar 54727
29.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 3, 2020, 02:49
29.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 3, 2020, 02:49
Sep 3, 2020, 02:49
 
Oh gooodie....

Now we can look forward to even MORE game developers being lazy with smart memory usage, and even more stupid memory leak bugs etc.

I remember when games had to make do with 640kb of RAM. People made pretty great shit with low ram requirements, things most devs would look at as impossible now.
Avatar 58327
28.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 3, 2020, 01:00
28.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 3, 2020, 01:00
Sep 3, 2020, 01:00
 
I think in those days pc cases were probably slow to change out so the button was just decoration. This was before even the Lian Li cases became popular.

Sepharo wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 23:22:
Slick wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 23:08:
maddog wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 18:29:
Slick wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 16:06:
Cutter wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 15:39:
Nah, I was just thinking in terms of another 'thing' trotted out that may never really get utilized like Intel's MMX.

I remember being so hyped when I got a P1 w/ MMX back in the day. SO FUNKY!

What about the "turbo" button on my 486. Not quite sure what that thing did.

DUDE! I remember those! A friend of mine had one with a clock-like LED display that went from 33 to 66 when you hit the turbo button. Were we able to overclock 200% clock speeds with a physical button? DID THAT HAPPEN? Or am I crazy? I was pretty young at the time.

A lot of PCs had that in the Win '95 days.
A hardware switch that overclocked and increased fan speeds.

Edit: I love wikipedia, an article for seemingly everything
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbo_button

Interesting that it contradicts my memory... Says rarely used with Pentiums, but that's the only thing I ever saw them on as a kid myself. I guess I was too young for noticing the earlier usages.
Also, interesting that its actual/original purpose was to slow computers down so they could play old games... Turbo ON was the default apparently.
Avatar 21885
27.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 23:27
27.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 23:27
Sep 2, 2020, 23:27
 
Thakk wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 14:26:
Question: So, would we need...

1. A DirectStorage compatible NVMe SSD
2. A DirectStorage compatible motherboard
3. DirectX with DirectStorage integration enabled/installed
4. A game that takes advantage of DirectStorage

?


According to the Nvidia 30xx presentation, just a compatible GPU and any NVMe PCIe drive + Directx libraries for the most basic functions. For the fancy stuff, games will probably have to take advantage of it.

Guess we'll have more info as time passes so take this^^ with a grain of salt.

This comment was edited on Sep 3, 2020, 07:26.
26.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 23:22
26.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 23:22
Sep 2, 2020, 23:22
 
Slick wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 23:08:
maddog wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 18:29:
Slick wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 16:06:
Cutter wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 15:39:
Nah, I was just thinking in terms of another 'thing' trotted out that may never really get utilized like Intel's MMX.

I remember being so hyped when I got a P1 w/ MMX back in the day. SO FUNKY!

What about the "turbo" button on my 486. Not quite sure what that thing did.

DUDE! I remember those! A friend of mine had one with a clock-like LED display that went from 33 to 66 when you hit the turbo button. Were we able to overclock 200% clock speeds with a physical button? DID THAT HAPPEN? Or am I crazy? I was pretty young at the time.

A lot of PCs had that in the Win '95 days.
A hardware switch that overclocked and increased fan speeds.

Edit: I love wikipedia, an article for seemingly everything
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbo_button

Interesting that it contradicts my memory... Says rarely used with Pentiums, but that's the only thing I ever saw them on as a kid myself. I guess I was too young for noticing the earlier usages.
Also, interesting that its actual/original purpose was to slow computers down so they could play old games... Turbo ON was the default apparently.
Avatar 17249
25.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 23:08
Slick
 
25.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 23:08
Sep 2, 2020, 23:08
 Slick
 
maddog wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 18:29:
Slick wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 16:06:
Cutter wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 15:39:
Nah, I was just thinking in terms of another 'thing' trotted out that may never really get utilized like Intel's MMX.

I remember being so hyped when I got a P1 w/ MMX back in the day. SO FUNKY!

What about the "turbo" button on my 486. Not quite sure what that thing did.

DUDE! I remember those! A friend of mine had one with a clock-like LED display that went from 33 to 66 when you hit the turbo button. Were we able to overclock 200% clock speeds with a physical button? DID THAT HAPPEN? Or am I crazy? I was pretty young at the time.
For your transgressions you shall be labeled a shill, called an idiot and anytime you mention facts or disagree with a tribe member you will henceforth be known as a troll. The best you can hope for is that the labels won't haunt your offspring. -RedEye9
Avatar 57545
24.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 22:55
24.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 22:55
Sep 2, 2020, 22:55
 
RedEye9 wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 18:36:
I'm not going to get that technical because it would hurt my head and I wouldn't understand it anyways, but don't you start running into an issue with the number of lanes if you have a mongo GPU along with 3 or more nvme drives all vying for the same freeway?

With current systems, yes. I don't give a flying fuck about Intel because they are so far behind so I'll focus on AMD. Current gen 3000 Ryzen systems can support up to 20 lanes (technically 24 but 4 are dedicated to the chipset interconnect so they're non-addressable). However, current gen EPYC CPUs give you 128 lanes per processor. It is not implausible to assume that future platforms within the next 1-5 years will gain some of EPYC's tech and provide more lanes than what is currently available. Most likely due to the future demands of GPUs and storage. We always see server tech filter down to desktops. Multigig NICs, for example.

//----\\

eRe4s3r wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 20:53:
I give you a neat hint: Pci-E extension cards for NVMe to PCI-E, cost about $15

You probably should check what games are sized at nowadays ^^ Because RAM DISK isn't a solution to anything. Ram is precious, and also should never be involved in LOADING something to the GPU but that's another issue.

Yeah, an add-in card that takes up a slot unnecessarily and disrupts airflow. I'll pass.

I am well aware of what games are sized at nowadays. The super huge ones are outliers, not median average. A random sample of game sizes I have currently installed:
Control Ultimate Edition - 42GB
Wasteland 3 - 37.8GB
Guild Wars 2 -47.6GB

For the sake of whole numbers, I rounded W3 and GW2 up to the nearest whole number which gives me a mean average of 43GB (again, rounded up to the nearest whole number).

I have VMs and video files that are larger than that.

A ramdisk is very much a solution to many applications. Hell, I have run whole OSes out of ramdisks with desktop environments and applications installed. They're also awesome for cache pools for DB transactions, write caches, read caches, data streaming pools between cluster nodes, etc. Data is just data. Also, in no way is RAM "precious" unless you're using some shithole OS like Windows which has its head shoved way up its ass in how it handles memory. Even monetarily, it isn't precious. I can deck out a system with 64GB of ECC DDR4 3200 RAM for $452USD. It wasn't that long ago that I would spend five times as much on half that much RAM.

Even so, the GPU is almost irrelevant in terms of external transfer speed because data doesn't magically leap off a disk straight to the GPU. It has to go through an engine which is largely processed by the CPU which is a sequential processing unit. We kind of cheat with multiple cores but few games are genuinely multithreaded to the point where processing threads in parallel actually achieves a substantive difference. Let's take our 32GB of ECC RAM. It's maximum theoretical transfer rate is 25GB/s. However, that's not indicative of actual, real world transfer because there's a whole bunch of things going on in the backend that is going to cut that down. So let's be optimistic and say 20GB/s. The fastest NVMe on the planet's maximum theoretical sequential read speed is 6.5GB/s and that NVMe (the Samsung 980 Pro) hasn't even seen the light of day yet. But wait, there's more! The PCI-e 4.0 spec states that an x4 configuration has a theoretical maximum of 8GB/s. So let's quadruple that for an x16 configuration and say the maximum theoretical limit is 32GB/s. Even on its best day, the fastest NVMe on the planet isn't going to be able to max out PCI-e 4,0's theoretical limit at its theoretical limit. What comes closest to filling that pipe the fastest is a ramdisk backed by ECC memory. BUT...we forgot a small detail. We need to deduct around 10% of the RAM's speed because, of course, ECC. So that drops it down to a real world speed of around 18GB/s. Which is bigger? A theoretical maximum of 6.5GB/s or a real world maximum of 18GB/s? And that's all just a really simplified view of just transfer rate. It doesn't take in to account loads of things like preemptive interrupts which is going to degrade speed even further. Things that are going to hit the NVMe a lot harder since it is further down the bus than the RAM.

RAM is there to be used, period. If it's not being used to at least 85% of capacity, it's wasted money and electricity.
"Lock the doors. Kill the light. No one's coming...home tonight. It's getting colder."

If you would like help or further details on a technical discussion we're having, email me at bnhelp (at sign) keepusiel.net .
Avatar 21247
23.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 20:53
23.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 20:53
Sep 2, 2020, 20:53
 
Burrito of Peace wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 15:58:

Speaking of NVMe, I really wish more motherboards had more than 2 NVMe slots.

I give you a neat hint: Pci-E extension cards for NVMe to PCI-E, cost about $15

You probably should check what games are sized at nowadays ^^ Because RAM DISK isn't a solution to anything. Ram is precious, and also should never be involved in LOADING something to the GPU but that's another issue.
Avatar 54727
22.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 18:40
Kxmode
 
22.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 18:40
Sep 2, 2020, 18:40
 Kxmode
 
"We cut out the middle man and ship the files directly to you!" Deal
"The present is a veil between anticipation and horror. Lift the veil... and madness may follow." source
Avatar 18786
21.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 18:38
21.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 18:38
Sep 2, 2020, 18:38
 
DLSS 2.1 was just released it supports VR (and 8k), that is very big news on that front and I bet a lot of the VR devs will want to get in on that.

Also seen an example of 1440P upscaled to 8k using DLSS and it looks stupid good. 8K is going to be real because of this.

This comment was edited on Sep 2, 2020, 19:34.
Avatar 17232
20.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 18:36
20.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 18:36
Sep 2, 2020, 18:36
 
Burrito of Peace wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 15:58:
Honestly, I'd rather they take a two tier approach.

Tier 1:
Does the system have 16GB or more of system RAM? Create a ramdisk. That's the primary asset streaming store for games.
Tier 2:
Does the system have an NVMe? Start using that once the ramdisk becomes full.

If the system does not have enough RAM, simply enable Tier 2 and be done.

Speaking of NVMe, I really wish more motherboards had more than 2 NVMe slots.
I'm not going to get that technical because it would hurt my head and I wouldn't understand it anyways, but don't you start running into an issue with the number of lanes if you have a mongo GPU along with 3 or more nvme drives all vying for the same freeway?

EDIT
And while I have your attention:
I don't know if you have goat heads but I use something similar to a Mr Tuffy liner which is vinyl, you can also use an old inner tube as a liner.
I also use Thorn resistant tubes and I slime them.
It adds weight but I NEVER get flats, and since I use my bicycle for local transportation it has to be bulletproof and reliable.
- At this point, Windows is the OS equivalent of Stockholm Syndrome. -
Burrito of Peace
Avatar 58135
19.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 18:29
19.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 18:29
Sep 2, 2020, 18:29
 
Slick wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 16:06:
Cutter wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 15:39:
Nah, I was just thinking in terms of another 'thing' trotted out that may never really get utilized like Intel's MMX.

I remember being so hyped when I got a P1 w/ MMX back in the day. SO FUNKY!

What about the "turbo" button on my 486. Not quite sure what that thing did.
Avatar 21885
18.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 17:26
18.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 17:26
Sep 2, 2020, 17:26
 
Thakk wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 14:26:
Question: So, would we need...

1. A DirectStorage compatible NVMe SSD
2. A DirectStorage compatible motherboard
3. DirectX with DirectStorage integration enabled/installed
4. A game that takes advantage of DirectStorage

?

I think DirectStorage will work with any NVMe SSD. Obviously you will need DirectX and a game to use it.
This is basically Vulkan for storage.

Burrito of Peace wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 15:58:
Honestly, I'd rather they take a two tier approach.

Tier 1:
Does the system have 16GB or more of system RAM? Create a ramdisk. That's the primary asset streaming store for games.
Tier 2:
Does the system have an NVMe? Start using that once the ramdisk becomes full.

Given the kind of data volumes games are using these days unless you've got 64GB or more, I'm not sure you'll see much value.
Anyway, games are pretty clever with loading data from disk these days, the big blocker is actually structuring the data so it will fit into the CPU cache.

17.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 16:50
17.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 16:50
Sep 2, 2020, 16:50
 
This is actually a benefit from the "Console Wars".

MS sees all the praise for the PS5 SSD tech, and wants to implement "something" (even though it's not at the hardware level) for the xbox.... PC's just gets some bits from that fight.

Between PCIE 4 specific NVMe SDD's (Like the 980 pro 7000MB/s) and games taking advantage of this "software enabled" tech... I'd imagine they should get nearly the same results as the PS5's hardware engineering.
Get your games from GOG DAMMIT!
Avatar 19499
16.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 16:34
16.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 16:34
Sep 2, 2020, 16:34
 
For those of us who have seen these stages of gaming .. you can see the future coming and its coming fast...while some of the technologies are still in early stages.. you can see where all this is going..

Imagine cloud computing with 8k resolution and nearly instant loading in a Virtual Reality setting via 5g (or future 6g)...we are not quite there for full haptics yet.. but damn what a ride...The next big jump in gaming isn't going to be graphics.. its going to be how we play the game.
15.
 
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans
Sep 2, 2020, 16:13
15.
Re: PC DirectX DirectStorage Plans Sep 2, 2020, 16:13
Sep 2, 2020, 16:13
 
Slick wrote on Sep 2, 2020, 16:10:
Also this is obviously the future, but it's going to take a good while for PCs to catch up, just look at the average system in a Steam hardware survey...

I'd consider this monumental shift for the better somewhat akin to Direct X 12. DX12 was manifested into existance in response to Mantle, when devs claimed they needed low-level access to free up CPU cycles and whatnot, overall a very good thing for gamers of all stripes.

BUT

DX12 came out in 2015. And only at the end of 2020 are we going to see games START to be coded for DX12 as a minimum spec.

So yeah, cross-platform games that are engineered from the ground up to work with this new fast storage tech are going to take a good long while to pop up on PC.

And the consoles are truly leading the charge on this one. Once there's 40 million next gen consoles sold or so, we'll start to see the transition (late 2022 I reckon) and then the first games that RELY on this tech will start to come out on PC, and still it will be a small fraction of PC players who will be able to play these titles compared to 40 million consoles already in-spec.

This is actually how it used to be once upon a time, the core get up to speed pretty quick when it's obvious.
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