Op Ed

  • PC Gamer - The inherent exclusivity of cloud gaming will kill it for PC gamers. Thanks Neutronbeam.
    "Publishers have, and always will have, complete control over who gets to play their games, and who's to say that shouldn't fall into the hands of the game's creators and owners. But with a PC-a-like platform already shot down, it's looking far less likely that cloud gaming will ever be able to offer PC gamers anything close to what we have already: a (relatively) open ecosystem that's really only limited by the technical capability of your hardware, not where said hardware physically exists."
View : : :
10 Replies. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
Newer [  1  ] Older
10.
 
Re: Op Ed
Jun 4, 2020, 14:21
10.
Re: Op Ed Jun 4, 2020, 14:21
Jun 4, 2020, 14:21
 
Kxmode wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 02:46:
jdreyer wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 02:31:
Kxmode wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 00:42:
"Will" implies absolute certainty. I can't entirely agree with that premise.

It will happen. It's the holy grail: publishers retain total control over the product. No more cheating or wares sites. That said, it will be a long time coming. In order to not lose sales, a streaming-only game depends on a critical mass of very high-speed infrastructure, say 80% of major markets (N.A, Europe, China-South Korea-Japan) or so. It will be many years before this exists in enough places in the world to make this feasible. And it will happen first to large publishers and AAA titles. Indie titles will probably always have installable .exes.

Also, I responded to you in our FTFY thread.

Publishers need us more than WE need them. WE tell publishers what to do by the absolute fact that WE control their existence. When WE don't support something, they know it. That was on full display with Stadia, Google's failed attempt to make cloud gaming mandatory. A failure that forced big industry publishers like UbiSoft to acknowledge.

Well, it's too early. The infrastructure isn't there yet. Also, I doubt something like Stadia is the future. My thought is the EA, Activision, etc. will go cloud-only at some point in the future, having their own streaming platforms. As a consumer, I think something like Nvidia Now is cool, second to having a PC at home: I'm essentially renting a cloud system and bringing my own games. However, the big publishers hate that model. They want it on their proprietary cloud systems.

Games are crack to most consumers, and they have less power than we think. As long as the big publishers make it reasonably available, people will buy it. The vast majority could care less if it's streamed to their TV from the cloud if performance is acceptable.

EDIT: LOL, Roguebanshee wrote exactly what I was thinking.
To prevent CV-19, avoid the Serious Seven: weddings, funerals, faith-based activities, bars, gyms, house gatherings and other small events.
Avatar 22024
9.
 
Re: Op Ed - Cloud Gaming
Jun 4, 2020, 12:24
Kxmode
 
9.
Re: Op Ed - Cloud Gaming Jun 4, 2020, 12:24
Jun 4, 2020, 12:24
 Kxmode
 
Beamer wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 10:00:
Jonjonz wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 06:30:
Publishers reacted the same way, with all the same rhetoric and posing when digital music sales and later streaming first surfaced. Same thing with CDs and epub. First denial and fear, then begrudged experimentation, exclusives and finally full acceptance that hey this thing works and it is profitable, we knew it all along and actually thought of the whole thing.

Cloud gaming will eventually become the dominant form of game distribution because it offers the least friction to publisher, customer and everyone in the chain, like music streaming does.

Current infrastructure is not totally up to snuff, but it is good enough to satisfy the average gamer.

Kind of.
Streaming music is not very profitable for anyone but streaming platforms. Spotify makes a lot of money. Labels and performers, not so much. You hardly hear anything about labels anymore, whereas they used to be huge.
Of course, for bands, they've also made it easy to get up and running and reach a wider audience to make money on touring, how most bands made their money. But streaming definitely sped the increase in bands/performers "selling out" and doing far more endorsements to find new ways to monetize their work.

For video, there's a reason why so many publishers are trying to create their own platform to own their own content, and why Netflix is getting fewer and fewer non-Amazon products.

Music lost control. Every other industry is trying to ensure that doesn't happen.

Streaming music and video is also easier than streaming video games. Games need a lot of bandwidth to make the presentation smooth and playable.

I think low-cost services like nVidia's Geforce Now and Shadow are great. They simply add another way to play a game instead of replacing local hardware.
"Hard times create strong men. Strong men create good times. Good times create weak men. And, weak men create hard times." - Those Who Remain by G. Michael Hopf
Avatar 18786
8.
 
Re: Op Ed - Cloud Gaming
Jun 4, 2020, 10:00
Beamer
 
8.
Re: Op Ed - Cloud Gaming Jun 4, 2020, 10:00
Jun 4, 2020, 10:00
 Beamer
 
Jonjonz wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 06:30:
Publishers reacted the same way, with all the same rhetoric and posing when digital music sales and later streaming first surfaced. Same thing with CDs and epub. First denial and fear, then begrudged experimentation, exclusives and finally full acceptance that hey this thing works and it is profitable, we knew it all along and actually thought of the whole thing.

Cloud gaming will eventually become the dominant form of game distribution because it offers the least friction to publisher, customer and everyone in the chain, like music streaming does.

Current infrastructure is not totally up to snuff, but it is good enough to satisfy the average gamer.

Kind of.
Streaming music is not very profitable for anyone but streaming platforms. Spotify makes a lot of money. Labels and performers, not so much. You hardly hear anything about labels anymore, whereas they used to be huge.
Of course, for bands, they've also made it easy to get up and running and reach a wider audience to make money on touring, how most bands made their money. But streaming definitely sped the increase in bands/performers "selling out" and doing far more endorsements to find new ways to monetize their work.

For video, there's a reason why so many publishers are trying to create their own platform to own their own content, and why Netflix is getting fewer and fewer non-Amazon products.

Music lost control. Every other industry is trying to ensure that doesn't happen.
7.
 
Re: Op Ed
Jun 4, 2020, 09:40
7.
Re: Op Ed Jun 4, 2020, 09:40
Jun 4, 2020, 09:40
 
Kxmode wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 02:46:
jdreyer wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 02:31:
Kxmode wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 00:42:
"Will" implies absolute certainty. I can't entirely agree with that premise.

It will happen. It's the holy grail: publishers retain total control over the product. No more cheating or wares sites. That said, it will be a long time coming. In order to not lose sales, a streaming-only game depends on a critical mass of very high-speed infrastructure, say 80% of major markets (N.A, Europe, China-South Korea-Japan) or so. It will be many years before this exists in enough places in the world to make this feasible. And it will happen first to large publishers and AAA titles. Indie titles will probably always have installable .exes.

Also, I responded to you in our FTFY thread.

Publishers need us more than WE need them. WE tell publishers what to do by the absolute fact that WE control their existence. When WE don't support something, they know it. That was on full display with Stadia, Google's failed attempt to make cloud gaming mandatory. A failure that forced big industry publishers like UbiSoft to acknowledge.
What a nice dream you have there.

It is almost a certainty that every majro publisher will jump at the first hint of cloud gaming being a realistic option (it isn't right now). And when you can only get access to "Major AAA Release Title" by using the publisher's cloud service, the majority of gamers will jump to it, as long as the service is actually reliable. UPlay, Origin, EGS, Battle.net and even Steam are only around because they have/have had major titles as exclusives.

Exclusives are going to be the way the big publishers drag everyone on to their cloud service platforms. You may not care about the first 50 titles to go cloud exclusive, but you're going to be forced to accept it at some point unless you completely abandon every major publisher. But the vast majority of gamers won't. Not even the ones protesting the loudest (see "Boycott Modern Warfare 2").

It might take 20 years (or even longer) for the infrastructure to be expanded enough in the US, but it will happen at some point.
6.
 
Re: Op Ed - Cloud Gaming
Jun 4, 2020, 08:07
Kxmode
 
6.
Re: Op Ed - Cloud Gaming Jun 4, 2020, 08:07
Jun 4, 2020, 08:07
 Kxmode
 
Jonjonz wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 06:30:
Publishers reacted the same way, with all the same rhetoric and posing when digital music sales and later streaming first surfaced. Same thing with CDs and epub. First denial and fear, then begrudged experimentation, exclusives and finally full acceptance that hey this thing works and it is profitable, we knew it all along and actually thought of the whole thing.

Cloud gaming will eventually become the dominant form of game distribution because it offers the least friction to publisher, customer and everyone in the chain, like music streaming does.

Current infrastructure is not totally up to snuff, but it is good enough to satisfy the average gamer.

Cloud Gaming cannot work as long as the underlining infrastructure doesn't exist. It has to get to a point where broadband Internet is as common as a utility. To that end, the FCC published a report in 2018 that concluded US Internet speeds are "among worst in the developed world." Many areas in the US have limited or no Internet. But those living there can still use local hardware via a console or PC as long as they have electricity.
"Hard times create strong men. Strong men create good times. Good times create weak men. And, weak men create hard times." - Those Who Remain by G. Michael Hopf
Avatar 18786
5.
 
Re: Op Ed - Cloud Gaming
Jun 4, 2020, 06:30
5.
Re: Op Ed - Cloud Gaming Jun 4, 2020, 06:30
Jun 4, 2020, 06:30
 
Publishers reacted the same way, with all the same rhetoric and posing when digital music sales and later streaming first surfaced. Same thing with CDs and epub. First denial and fear, then begrudged experimentation, exclusives and finally full acceptance that hey this thing works and it is profitable, we knew it all along and actually thought of the whole thing.

Cloud gaming will eventually become the dominant form of game distribution because it offers the least friction to publisher, customer and everyone in the chain, like music streaming does.

Current infrastructure is not totally up to snuff, but it is good enough to satisfy the average gamer.
"Meet the new Boss, same as the old Boss." - The Who.
Avatar 57379
4.
 
Re: Op Ed
Jun 4, 2020, 02:46
Kxmode
 
4.
Re: Op Ed Jun 4, 2020, 02:46
Jun 4, 2020, 02:46
 Kxmode
 
jdreyer wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 02:31:
Kxmode wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 00:42:
"Will" implies absolute certainty. I can't entirely agree with that premise.

It will happen. It's the holy grail: publishers retain total control over the product. No more cheating or wares sites. That said, it will be a long time coming. In order to not lose sales, a streaming-only game depends on a critical mass of very high-speed infrastructure, say 80% of major markets (N.A, Europe, China-South Korea-Japan) or so. It will be many years before this exists in enough places in the world to make this feasible. And it will happen first to large publishers and AAA titles. Indie titles will probably always have installable .exes.

Also, I responded to you in our FTFY thread.

Publishers need us more than WE need them. WE tell publishers what to do by the absolute fact that WE control their existence. When WE don't support something, they know it. That was on full display with Stadia, Google's failed attempt to make cloud gaming mandatory. A failure that forced big industry publishers like UbiSoft to acknowledge.
"Hard times create strong men. Strong men create good times. Good times create weak men. And, weak men create hard times." - Those Who Remain by G. Michael Hopf
Avatar 18786
3.
 
Re: Op Ed
Jun 4, 2020, 02:31
3.
Re: Op Ed Jun 4, 2020, 02:31
Jun 4, 2020, 02:31
 
Kxmode wrote on Jun 4, 2020, 00:42:
"Will" implies absolute certainty. I can't entirely agree with that premise.

It will happen. It's the holy grail: publishers retain total control over the product. No more cheating or wares sites. That said, it will be a long time coming. In order to not lose sales, a streaming-only game depends on a critical mass of very high-speed infrastructure, say 80% of major markets (N.A, Europe, China-South Korea-Japan) or so. It will be many years before this exists in enough places in the world to make this feasible. And it will happen first to large publishers and AAA titles. Indie titles will probably always have installable .exes.

Also, I responded to you in our FTFY thread.
To prevent CV-19, avoid the Serious Seven: weddings, funerals, faith-based activities, bars, gyms, house gatherings and other small events.
Avatar 22024
2.
 
Re: Op Ed
Jun 4, 2020, 00:42
Kxmode
 
2.
Re: Op Ed Jun 4, 2020, 00:42
Jun 4, 2020, 00:42
 Kxmode
 
"Will" implies absolute certainty. I can't entirely agree with that premise.
"Hard times create strong men. Strong men create good times. Good times create weak men. And, weak men create hard times." - Those Who Remain by G. Michael Hopf
Avatar 18786
1.
 
Re: Op Ed
Jun 3, 2020, 20:30
1.
Re: Op Ed Jun 3, 2020, 20:30
Jun 3, 2020, 20:30
 
The only type of cloud gaming I can honestly support is a system like Geforce Now, where we can stream games we already own on storefronts like Steam, but we still have access to the game files to run on our own systems locally (and don't lose access if that cloud service shuts down).
10 Replies. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
Newer [  1  ] Older