Op Ed

VentureBeat - Give me a Diablo II remaster, not Diablo IV.
"I imagine that Diablo IV will look more like Diablo III than Diablo II. And Blizzard will have to focus on ways to keep Diablo IV relevant and profitable long after its launch with the same games-as-service systems that it’s used for Overwatch and Hearthstone. That means I expect constant updates and a story that lacks a satisfying conclusion at launch.

That’s why I’d prefer to just play Diablo II again. Blizzard has been doing a great job remastering some of its older games, like StarCraft. It’s even doing a full remake of Warcraft III. In Diablo II’s case, I prefer the remaster route. I don’t need a complete overhaul. Like I said before, those grainy, choppy graphics are a part of the game’s charm. I just want things like updated video options and better online support."

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Re: No EGS Exclusivity for EVERSPACE 2
Oct 7, 2019, 23:56
Kxmode
 
21.
Re: No EGS Exclusivity for EVERSPACE 2 Oct 7, 2019, 23:56
Oct 7, 2019, 23:56
 Kxmode
 
Beamer wrote on Oct 7, 2019, 17:28:
eRe4s3r wrote on Oct 7, 2019, 17:17:
Kxmode wrote on Oct 7, 2019, 17:03:
eRe4s3r wrote on Oct 7, 2019, 13:03:
Kxmode wrote on Oct 7, 2019, 12:43:
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You're both wrong, but you're more wrong than he is.

The hallmark of games as a service is a continued revenue model. Not that it's on the servers of one entity, and not that it's feature-incomplete. It's just a continued revenue model. If you're not paying an access fee, it's not GAAS. Some will extend this to just continued revenue, including microtransactions, but I disagree and consider that a third model. GAAS just needs to be a service, such as cable or internet or gas or electricity, instead of something you buy once, such as your house or your car (most likely.)

Please don't tell me I'm wrong. I work in an IT department at an eCommerce company as the Lead Frontend Developer. We make SAAS products. I know what I'm talking about when I describe GAAS.

Firstly, anything labeled "-as-a-Service" is always going to have a service model (that quite literally is what "as-a-service" entails), and a service model typically involves a paid subscription. What the service provides either defines it has a Game or Software.

So, for example, Adobe's Creative Cloud is a SAAS. Google's upcoming Stadia is a SAAS. FreshBooks.com is a cloud-based SAAS.

It is correct to call all of those SAAS products because you subscribe to the service to access a product that receives continuous improvements. In one example, for Photoshop and Illustrator, and the other for video games.

Regarding, "[t]he hallmark of games as a service is a continued revenue model." Unlike Software-as-a-Service, Games-as-a-Service follows the same, almost identical, characteristics of a SAAS. However, there are several key differences.

1. You purchased the product once and connect to a live server to play without a subscription.
2. When you buy GAAS products (or live service video games), you typically do not get a finished product.
3. GAAS doesn't have a persistent revenue model, aka subscription service. (Even though microtransactions take in monthly income, they cannot be classified as a persistent revenue model. They are known as a business model. If you search online, almost everyone labels MTX as a "business model" which is not persistent.)
4. GAAS titles typically have lots of microtransactions to keep the product and/or company funded (though, again, microtransactions isn't considered a persistent revenue model).
5. THE KEY DEFINITION: the publisher intends to build out its product over time in an iterative manner. They do this by never informing the consumer that is their intention, nor do they ever tell the consumer that's the type of product they are purchasing. (IMHO it's borderline unethical business behavior but, you know, whatever.)

What is NOT a SAAS:

- Anthem, Fallout 76, and No Man's Sky cannot be classified as SAAS because you never subscribe to play them. You could buy and play them without spending another dime.

What is NOT a GAAS:
- World of Warcraft isn't a GAAS because vanilla WOW launched as a complete feature product where a player could experience the entire game from start to finish (up to level 60).
- League of Legends and Fortnite aren't GAAS because they both launched as feature-complete products full of options.
- Star Citizen isn't a GAAS because it's still in development and is classified as a early access product. However, it if it released today it would absolutely be classified as a GAAS product.

The bottom line is the reason companies haven't been clear with the gaming public is we are not ready for the Games-as-a-Service model. We are conditioned to expect that in exchange for our hard-earned gaming dollars, we get a full experience from start to finish. For an EA and Activision the promise of quickly releasing games that they can grow out over time is very attractive from a cost perspective. I can see why they want it, but again we are not conditioned for that kind of gaming.
"Hard times create strong men. Strong men create good times. Good times create weak men. And, weak men create hard times." - Those Who Remain by G. Michael Hopf
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