G2A Fights Back

A post on the G2A Website responds to the recent news of developers saying they'd prefer gamers pirate their games over buying keys through G2A's marketplace. G2A offers a lengthy defense of their practices, claiming their business is based on the same principles as other digital storefronts while telling their side of the story about where they get their game keys. They also look to address complaints about credit card chargebacks, promising to reimburse developers tenfold for any money they've lost on them, though the developer must be able to prove keys were illegally obtained before doing so. They offer "wall of text" explanation along with this shorter version:
Let’s lay all cards on the table. We will pay developers 10 times the money they lost on chargebacks after their illegally obtained keys were sold on G2A. The idea is simple: developers just need to prove such a thing actually happened on their stores.

To assure honesty and transparency, we will ask a reputable and independent auditing company to make an unbiased examination of both sides – the developer’s store and G2A Marketplace. The cost of the first three audits is on us, every next one will be split 50/50.

The auditing company will check if any game keys sold on G2A were obtained using stolen credit cards on a developer’s store compliant with card scheme rules from Visa and Master Card/payment provider rules. If so, G2A guarantees it’ll pay all the money the developer lost on chargebacks… multiplied by 10.

We want this process to be transparent, so we will publicly report every step of the procedure. Meaning, you will get information such as who came forward, and what the verdict was, all of which will be published for everyone to see.

If you’re a developer willing to cooperate, contact the G2A Direct team

***

And now onto some other Twitter-related issues that have popped up in the last few days.

For the sake of your time, here’s a TL;DR version:

  • G2A is a marketplace that’s all about making the prices for gamers as low as possible.
  • G2A’s business model is the same as any other big, global marketplaces’ like Amazon or eBay, with all its ups and downs. And just like them, we always try to maximize the ups and minimize the downs. Not only because of the law, but also because the customers require certain standards, and because the competition would beat us if we stayed behind.
  • Out of all marketplaces, G2A offers the best benefits for copyright owners – G2A Direct. Nobody else gives developers a percentage cut of all sales on their games sold by someone else.
  • G2A, like most online businesses, uses automated marketing, so every product available on the marketplace can be shown based on what the user is interested in.
  • If any developer suspects there are keys on the marketplace that shouldn’t be there, there’s a quick and easy way to report it. All it takes is to contact us. If any key was illegally obtained, we’ll remove it, block the seller and provide their personal data to the proper authorities.
  • We are and always were open for discussion, but a real one, not empty accusations and catchy slogans.

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20.
 
Re: G2A Fights Back
Jul 5, 2019, 15:58
20.
Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 15:58
Jul 5, 2019, 15:58
 
I find this all highly amusing.

What the publishers really want is protectionist capitalism. They want to sell globally but only at prices they have fixed in certain markets. However, data is region agnostic and an actual free market doesn't work that way. Let's say I want to buy a car. I can buy it locally for X price but if I drive 4 hours to another state (well, not Texas because Texas distances are measured in days) I can buy the same car for X-$10,000. Why would I not drive 4 hours to save myself ten grand? I see that as what people who buy from G2A, CDKeys, GMG, and others are doing. They are protecting their pocket book which they have every right and responsibility to do. Now, should there be actual, provable evidence (which one anecdote does not provide) that fraud is occurring then that is a problem that needs to be addressed. However, outside of accusations, I don't see any provable evidence being supplied. I see a lot of whining from publishers, though.

I also don't buy the excuse of "Well, Call of Halo Battlefield 97,173 won't get made because it is soooooooo expensive to make and A region pays less so B region subsidizes A region by paying more." Then don't make the game. Hell, let the publishers who are playing this shell game crash and burn. It'll be good for us in the long term. I'm old enough to remember the videogame market crash of the 1983. While people pissed and moaned about it being the end of all things, it actually ended up being a good thing for us as gamers. We got Electronic Arts out of it (the good version which made awesome games, not the current shitlord), Origin Systems, Sierra On-Line, Westwood Studios, Blizzard Entertainment, and many others. We saw a resurgence in games for the PC that lasted well through the 90s in to the early 2000s.

Should EA, Ubisoft, and others flame out and die, other companies will emerge after a period of recovery and start putting out titles. That's just the cyclical nature of non-corporeal goods based market. Anyone here still pining for the glory days of Packard, Hudson, Cord, Sears, Kmart, Compaq, eMachines, Gateway, Matrox, Trident, or Hercules?

"No matter where you go, there you are." Buckaroo Banzai

There are two types of computer users: Masochists and Linux users.

If you would like help or further details on a technical discussion we're having, email me at bnhelp (at sign) keepusiel.net . Pl
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