Send News. Want a reply? Read this. More in the FAQ.   News Forum - All Forums - Mobile - PDA - RSS Headlines  RSS Headlines   Twitter  Twitter
Customize
User Settings
Styles:

G2A Fights Back

A post on the G2A Website responds to the recent news of developers saying they'd prefer gamers pirate their games over buying keys through G2A's marketplace. G2A offers a lengthy defense of their practices, claiming their business is based on the same principles as other digital storefronts while telling their side of the story about where they get their game keys. They also look to address complaints about credit card chargebacks, promising to reimburse developers tenfold for any money they've lost on them, though the developer must be able to prove keys were illegally obtained before doing so. They offer "wall of text" explanation along with this shorter version:

Let’s lay all cards on the table. We will pay developers 10 times the money they lost on chargebacks after their illegally obtained keys were sold on G2A. The idea is simple: developers just need to prove such a thing actually happened on their stores.

To assure honesty and transparency, we will ask a reputable and independent auditing company to make an unbiased examination of both sides – the developer’s store and G2A Marketplace. The cost of the first three audits is on us, every next one will be split 50/50.

The auditing company will check if any game keys sold on G2A were obtained using stolen credit cards on a developer’s store compliant with card scheme rules from Visa and Master Card/payment provider rules. If so, G2A guarantees it’ll pay all the money the developer lost on chargebacks… multiplied by 10.

We want this process to be transparent, so we will publicly report every step of the procedure. Meaning, you will get information such as who came forward, and what the verdict was, all of which will be published for everyone to see.

If you’re a developer willing to cooperate, contact the G2A Direct team

***

And now onto some other Twitter-related issues that have popped up in the last few days.

For the sake of your time, here’s a TL;DR version:

  • G2A is a marketplace that’s all about making the prices for gamers as low as possible.
  • G2A’s business model is the same as any other big, global marketplaces’ like Amazon or eBay, with all its ups and downs. And just like them, we always try to maximize the ups and minimize the downs. Not only because of the law, but also because the customers require certain standards, and because the competition would beat us if we stayed behind.
  • Out of all marketplaces, G2A offers the best benefits for copyright owners – G2A Direct. Nobody else gives developers a percentage cut of all sales on their games sold by someone else.
  • G2A, like most online businesses, uses automated marketing, so every product available on the marketplace can be shown based on what the user is interested in.
  • If any developer suspects there are keys on the marketplace that shouldn’t be there, there’s a quick and easy way to report it. All it takes is to contact us. If any key was illegally obtained, we’ll remove it, block the seller and provide their personal data to the proper authorities.
  • We are and always were open for discussion, but a real one, not empty accusations and catchy slogans.

View
31 Replies. 2 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 ] Older >

31. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 6, 2019, 13:11 jdreyer
 
El Pit wrote on Jul 6, 2019, 08:57:
Food for thought: if a US company buys cheap steel for millions or even billions from China to produce cheaper (which also help US clients because of the cheaper prices), it is okay despite US steel producing companies are getting screwed. If you buy a product (game) cheap on the world market from a seller from another country, it is wrong. In both cases the people who produced the steel/game are getting screwed - but in one case it is huge time and alright, in the other it is small time and bad.

This is the modern, janus-headed economy. Whatever - we chose it this way.
I'm not sure comparing Chinese steel to games is the best analogy. There are a lot of differences.
1. The Chinese government subsidized it with the intent of putting other countries out of the steel business.
2. China manipulated its currency for the same reason.
3. Steel has to be shipped, which adds to the price.
4. It has to be imported which subjects it to tariffs and volume restrictions
5. Lots of people do not think that flooding the US with cheap steel is good. Tapping into that is how Trump got elected.
 
Avatar 22024
 
The land in Minecraft is flat, Minecraft simulates the Earth, ergo the Earth is flat.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
30. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 6, 2019, 08:57 El Pit
 
Food for thought: if a US company buys cheap steel for millions or even billions from China to produce cheaper (which also help US clients because of the cheaper prices), it is okay despite US steel producing companies are getting screwed. If you buy a product (game) cheap on the world market from a seller from another country, it is wrong. In both cases the people who produced the steel/game are getting screwed - but in one case it is huge time and alright, in the other it is small time and bad.

This is the modern, janus-headed economy. Whatever - we chose it this way.
 
They're waiting for you, Gabe, in the test chamber!
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
29. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 21:52 MoreLuckThanSkill
 
Renegades Hang wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 18:19:
MoreLuckThanSkill wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 12:51:
....The remainder of their keys are bought in low price markets and resold, which is at best, in a gray area legally.

How is that a grey area in any way whatsoever? If Amazon is selling $20 basketballs for $10 and I buy a bunch of them and sell them for $15 once the Amazon price returns to normal, who has been cheated here? Everyone benefits: Amazon sold more basketballs than they otherwise would have, the person who bought them from me saved $5 more than they would have at $20, and I made money I wouldn't have for orchestrating the transaction.

You're thinking about this on a personal level. One person doing this would be no problem. On a large scale, it'll just drive up prices for people living in discount key/third world countries. Now of course in the short term the hypothetical you can profit, but in the long term you screw over a LOT of people(strangers of course) by your hypothetical greed/scalping.

As far as your other points, as jdreyer said, it's very easy for game companies to revoke/annul keys for games these days, and most companies refuse to give the end customer any sort of refund. It happens all of the time now.
 
Avatar 54863
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
28. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 18:58 RedEye9
 
Acleacius wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 18:56:
jdreyer wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 18:27:
Creston wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 18:17:
Burrito of Peace wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 15:58:
I'm old enough to remember the videogame market crash of the 1983.

Goddamn man, you are old!

*is old enough to remember that time himself...*

I'm old enough to remember it, I just don't remember it.
Same, think it has to do with Atari's flood of games att.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_game_crash_of_1983
 
Avatar 58135
 
“If the facts are against you, argue the law. If the law is against you, argue the facts. If the law and the facts are against you, pound the table and yell like hell.”
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
27. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 18:56 Acleacius
 
jdreyer wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 18:27:
Creston wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 18:17:
Burrito of Peace wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 15:58:
I'm old enough to remember the videogame market crash of the 1983.

Goddamn man, you are old!

*is old enough to remember that time himself...*

I'm old enough to remember it, I just don't remember it.
Same, think it has to do with Atari's flood of games att.
 
Avatar 1858
 
people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
26. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 18:53 jdreyer
 
Burrito of Peace wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 15:58:
I find this all highly amusing.

What the publishers really want is protectionist capitalism. They want to sell globally but only at prices they have fixed in certain markets. However, data is region agnostic and an actual free market doesn't work that way. Let's say I want to buy a car. I can buy it locally for X price but if I drive 4 hours to another state (well, not Texas because Texas distances are measured in days) I can buy the same car for X-$10,000. Why would I not drive 4 hours to save myself ten grand? I see that as what people who buy from G2A, CDKeys, GMG, and others are doing. They are protecting their pocket book which they have every right and responsibility to do. Now, should there be actual, provable evidence (which one anecdote does not provide) that fraud is occurring then that is a problem that needs to be addressed. However, outside of accusations, I don't see any provable evidence being supplied. I see a lot of whining from publishers, though.

I also don't buy the excuse of "Well, Call of Halo Battlefield 97,173 won't get made because it is soooooooo expensive to make and A region pays less so B region subsidizes A region by paying more." Then don't make the game. Hell, let the publishers who are playing this shell game crash and burn. It'll be good for us in the long term. I'm old enough to remember the videogame market crash of the 1983. While people pissed and moaned about it being the end of all things, it actually ended up being a good thing for us as gamers. We got Electronic Arts out of it (the good version which made awesome games, not the current shitlord), Origin Systems, Sierra On-Line, Westwood Studios, Blizzard Entertainment, and many others. We saw a resurgence in games for the PC that lasted well through the 90s in to the early 2000s.

Should EA, Ubisoft, and others flame out and die, other companies will emerge after a period of recovery and start putting out titles. That's just the cyclical nature of non-corporeal goods based market. Anyone here still pining for the glory days of Packard, Hudson, Cord, Sears, Kmart, Compaq, eMachines, Gateway, Matrox, Trident, or Hercules?

With almost any other product, there would be a myriad of other costs associated with buying from another country: tariffs, taxes, shipping,import restrictions, etc. that would affect the price. Those are missing from games for two reasons:
1. The lack of cost for shipping software electronically.
2. The lack of import regulations.
From this perspective, I can see why publishers and devs bristle at the inability to handle sales globally the way other industries do. Not sure what the solution is, but it's a unique problem.
 
Avatar 22024
 
The land in Minecraft is flat, Minecraft simulates the Earth, ergo the Earth is flat.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
25. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 18:41 jdreyer
 
Renegades Hang wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 18:19:
MoreLuckThanSkill wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 12:51:
....The remainder of their keys are bought in low price markets and resold, which is at best, in a gray area legally.

How is that a grey area in any way whatsoever? If Amazon is selling $20 basketballs for $10 and I buy a bunch of them and sell them for $15 once the Amazon price returns to normal, who has been cheated here? Everyone benefits: Amazon sold more basketballs than they otherwise would have, the person who bought them from me saved $5 more than they would have at $20, and I made money I wouldn't have for orchestrating the transaction.

If nobody calls to report the card stolen, they just bill the customer...

Well of course they do since their fraud check didn't consider it suspicious enough to stop and so they have to assume it was a legitimate purchase. I work as a fraud analyst at a major retailer and I can tell you that you have to let many suspicious transactions go through or else you will be canceling or holding up way too many orders. Fraud checks require balancing speed with suspicion.

if somebody does call, they just cancel those charges and the guy who bought that key from G2A ends up getting screwed eventually.

I doubt the guy that bought from G2A gets screwed. Here is how a similar situation works in my biz. If a fraudster steals a credit card and buys product from our store and then sells that product on ebay, the person who unwittingly bought the items from the fraudster on ebay has nothing happen to him. He keeps his products and will probably never be told by anyone that he bought stolen goods. Nothing happens to Ebay either since it wasn't their fault. The person who's card was stolen also gets their money back from the card company. The people who get screwed are either the credit card company that let the original fraud purchase go through at our biz, or our biz. It depends on a few circumstances whether we or the credit card pays.
If the retailer could magically reach into the customer's home and pull the stolen item back, they would do that a lot more often. You can do that with software keys. Only takes 60 seconds.
 
Avatar 22024
 
The land in Minecraft is flat, Minecraft simulates the Earth, ergo the Earth is flat.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
24. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 18:27 jdreyer
 
Creston wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 18:17:
Burrito of Peace wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 15:58:
I'm old enough to remember the videogame market crash of the 1983.

Goddamn man, you are old!

*is old enough to remember that time himself...*

I'm old enough to remember it, I just don't remember it.
 
Avatar 22024
 
The land in Minecraft is flat, Minecraft simulates the Earth, ergo the Earth is flat.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
23. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 18:19 Renegades Hang
 
MoreLuckThanSkill wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 12:51:
....The remainder of their keys are bought in low price markets and resold, which is at best, in a gray area legally.

How is that a grey area in any way whatsoever? If Amazon is selling $20 basketballs for $10 and I buy a bunch of them and sell them for $15 once the Amazon price returns to normal, who has been cheated here? Everyone benefits: Amazon sold more basketballs than they otherwise would have, the person who bought them from me saved $5 more than they would have at $20, and I made money I wouldn't have for orchestrating the transaction.

If nobody calls to report the card stolen, they just bill the customer...

Well of course they do since their fraud check didn't consider it suspicious enough to stop and so they have to assume it was a legitimate purchase. I work as a fraud analyst at a major retailer and I can tell you that you have to let many suspicious transactions go through or else you will be canceling or holding up way too many orders. Fraud checks require balancing speed with suspicion.

if somebody does call, they just cancel those charges and the guy who bought that key from G2A ends up getting screwed eventually.

I doubt the guy that bought from G2A gets screwed. Here is how a similar situation works in my biz. If a fraudster steals a credit card and buys product from our store and then sells that product on ebay, the person who unwittingly bought the items from the fraudster on ebay has nothing happen to him. He keeps his products and will probably never be told by anyone that he bought stolen goods. Nothing happens to Ebay either since it wasn't their fault. The person who's card was stolen also gets their money back from the card company. The people who get screwed are either the credit card company that let the original fraud purchase go through at our biz, or our biz. It depends on a few circumstances whether we or the credit card pays.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
22. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 18:17 Creston
 
Burrito of Peace wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 15:58:
I'm old enough to remember the videogame market crash of the 1983.

Goddamn man, you are old!

*is old enough to remember that time himself...*
 
Avatar 15604
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
21. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 17:45 Shifter2000
 
"What the publishers really want is protectionist capitalism."

You're thinking of large publishers - like EA or Origin. You even used a sly reference to them later on. What is being discussed here is smaller indie developers.

It's like going to your local craft market, buying bulk in discount (and I use that term loosely)...or stealing if they're not looking...a creator's wares, then undercutting the original maker by selling them in your own mall for a fraction of the original purchase price.

"However, outside of accusations, I don't see any provable evidence being supplied. I see a lot of whining from publishers, though."

You only need to do a quick Google search to see that a lot of this happened in the past with G2A.

Having been burned by G2A myself, I wouldn't touch them with a ten foot pole.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
20. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 15:58 Burrito of Peace
 
I find this all highly amusing.

What the publishers really want is protectionist capitalism. They want to sell globally but only at prices they have fixed in certain markets. However, data is region agnostic and an actual free market doesn't work that way. Let's say I want to buy a car. I can buy it locally for X price but if I drive 4 hours to another state (well, not Texas because Texas distances are measured in days) I can buy the same car for X-$10,000. Why would I not drive 4 hours to save myself ten grand? I see that as what people who buy from G2A, CDKeys, GMG, and others are doing. They are protecting their pocket book which they have every right and responsibility to do. Now, should there be actual, provable evidence (which one anecdote does not provide) that fraud is occurring then that is a problem that needs to be addressed. However, outside of accusations, I don't see any provable evidence being supplied. I see a lot of whining from publishers, though.

I also don't buy the excuse of "Well, Call of Halo Battlefield 97,173 won't get made because it is soooooooo expensive to make and A region pays less so B region subsidizes A region by paying more." Then don't make the game. Hell, let the publishers who are playing this shell game crash and burn. It'll be good for us in the long term. I'm old enough to remember the videogame market crash of the 1983. While people pissed and moaned about it being the end of all things, it actually ended up being a good thing for us as gamers. We got Electronic Arts out of it (the good version which made awesome games, not the current shitlord), Origin Systems, Sierra On-Line, Westwood Studios, Blizzard Entertainment, and many others. We saw a resurgence in games for the PC that lasted well through the 90s in to the early 2000s.

Should EA, Ubisoft, and others flame out and die, other companies will emerge after a period of recovery and start putting out titles. That's just the cyclical nature of non-corporeal goods based market. Anyone here still pining for the glory days of Packard, Hudson, Cord, Sears, Kmart, Compaq, eMachines, Gateway, Matrox, Trident, or Hercules?

 
Avatar 21247
 
"No matter where you go, there you are." Buckaroo Banzai
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
19. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 14:57 Verno
 
Wallshadows wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 14:41:
Stupid question but do you know if top selling titles is defined by amount of keys sold on Steam or games activated on Steam? Because nine times out of ten you can go to Greenmangaming and they will have newly released games (even preorders) for 20% off with a Steam key.

Not a stupid question at all, as RE9 said the Steam top title list is always by revenue. That's why you often see the same games like GTA V in there. GMG sells very close to cost, its their business model.
 
Avatar 51617
 
Playing: Link's Awakening, Control, Total War Warhammer 2
Watching: Mr. Mercedes, Hobbs & Shaw, Castle Rock
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
18. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 14:48 BIGtrouble77
 
Cutter wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 13:59:
For someone who lives in a country that gets screwed on regional pricing you'd be looking for deals too via key resellers. Blame the greedy publishers for this mess. Hell, I remember for Mass Effect 3 EA was selling it for half-price in Mexico through Origin so I, and a ton of other people, just used a VPN to buy a key and saved myself 50% more than what I would have paid here for the exact same product. Fuck the pubs.

But you don't get screwed on regional pricing in Steam. I lived in Canada for 3 years... I always used Canadian billing in Steam because Valve is very friendly with the conversion rates. I'd usually save about $2 vs the US store.
 
Avatar 20018
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
17. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 14:47 RedEye9
 
Wallshadows wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 14:41:
Pays publishers back after they provide proof.

Here's $20 in Venezuelan Bolivar.

Verno wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 14:30:
I looked up 3 recent AAA releases on Steam, they're $79.99 CDN which is $61 USD according to the XE currency converter and doesn't seem outrageous to me /shrug

Stupid question but do you know if top selling titles is defined by amount of keys sold on Steam or games activated on Steam? Because nine times out of ten you can go to Greenmangaming and they will have newly released games (even preorders) for 20% off with a Steam key.
Steams Top Ten list is based on revenue that steam collected from game sales.
 
Avatar 58135
 
“If the facts are against you, argue the law. If the law is against you, argue the facts. If the law and the facts are against you, pound the table and yell like hell.”
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
16. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 14:41 Wallshadows
 
Pays publishers back after they provide proof.

Here's $20 in Venezuelan Bolivar.

Verno wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 14:30:
I looked up 3 recent AAA releases on Steam, they're $79.99 CDN which is $61 USD according to the XE currency converter and doesn't seem outrageous to me /shrug

Stupid question but do you know if top selling titles is defined by amount of keys sold on Steam or games activated on Steam? Because nine times out of ten you can go to Greenmangaming and they will have newly released games (even preorders) for 20% off with a Steam key.
 
Avatar 50040
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
15. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 14:30 Verno
 
This hurts indies a lot more than it hurts the publishers anyway, its just silly rationalization. Last time I checked Canadian video game sales were doing just fine despite any regional (and arguably dollar driven) differences. I looked up 3 recent AAA releases on Steam, they're $79.99 CDN which is $61 USD according to the XE currency converter and doesn't seem outrageous to me /shrug  
Avatar 51617
 
Playing: Link's Awakening, Control, Total War Warhammer 2
Watching: Mr. Mercedes, Hobbs & Shaw, Castle Rock
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
14. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 14:21 Alamar
 
Cutter wrote on Jul 5, 2019, 13:59:
For someone who lives in a country that gets screwed on regional pricing you'd be looking for deals too via key resellers. Blame the greedy publishers for this mess. Hell, I remember for Mass Effect 3 EA was selling it for half-price in Mexico through Origin so I, and a ton of other people, just used a VPN to buy a key and saved myself 50% more than what I would have paid here for the exact same product. Fuck the pubs.


Just because you're shitty, doesn't mean the rest of our country is... Don't use us to justify your greedy excuses.
 
Avatar 22996
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
13. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 13:59 Cutter
 
For someone who lives in a country that gets screwed on regional pricing you'd be looking for deals too via key resellers. Blame the greedy publishers for this mess. Hell, I remember for Mass Effect 3 EA was selling it for half-price in Mexico through Origin so I, and a ton of other people, just used a VPN to buy a key and saved myself 50% more than what I would have paid here for the exact same product. Fuck the pubs.

 
Avatar 25394
 
"Ah, Impressionists, the boy bands of the art world." - Sideshow Bob
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
12. Re: G2A Fights Back Jul 5, 2019, 13:12 roguebanshee
 
G2A: "There'll always be fraud, so it's ok if we do it and ignore the issues it causes for indie developers."  
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
31 Replies. 2 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 ] Older >


footer

Blue's News logo