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Sunday Mobilization

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9. Re: Sunday Mobilization Jun 10, 2019, 13:52 Porn-O-Matic
 
And next month someone will release a different study that says using a GPS is shown to prevent Alzheimer's, or some other crap. So-called scientists, doctors, researchers... whatever, nobody knows shit any more.  
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8. Re: Sunday Mobilization Jun 10, 2019, 02:19 Armengar
 
I found it odd that apparently you start to rely on what you know after 19. I got into hiking later on in life and completed my mountain leader in my 40's. Im part of a youth organisation and took the qualification so i could take kids into the rough hills. ML needs lots of nav, low vis nav' micro nav etc to pass and I learnt and practiced all that in my 40's.

Now im looking to pass my winter ML maybe next year and that again has lots of nav in it.

I do use gps and wouldnt dream of leaving home without either my phone or garmin unit. I rely on it rarely though and always like to have an overview of my driving plans and always have an overview of my walking plans.
 
Its not the cough that carries you off but the coffin they carry you off in.
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7. Re: Sunday Mobilization Jun 9, 2019, 20:16 Luke
 
Wait for 5G.....  
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6. Re: Sunday Mobilization Jun 9, 2019, 20:10 G.oZ
 
RedEye9 wrote on Jun 9, 2019, 19:18:

Saturated with devices, children today might grow up to see navigation from memory or a paper map as anachronistic as rote memorization or typewriting.

practicing navigation is a powerful form of engagement with the environment that can inspire a greater sense of stewardship. Finding our way on our own — using perception, empirical observation and problem-solving skills — forces us to attune ourselves to the world.


Is it something important anyone really needs to worry about? It is definitely a life skill to be able to get around without constant computerised directions.

I have seen anecdotes about people from younger generations somewhat amazed &/or perplexed at an older person being able to look at a street directory and then navigate.

Even if using navigation, I will still want to look at a map to get a general sense of where I'm going beforehand. I'll still sometimes navigate by on-screen map in the car instead of putting in an actual address for assisted navigation.
 
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5. Re: Sunday Mobilization Jun 9, 2019, 20:04 Jivaro
 
There are far worse things ruining our brains that would be much easier to stop using or doing. Any one of us could probably make a list of 10 without even stopping to give it much thought. If I limited it to electronics it might take an extra second or two.

I am not saying small problems aren't worth addressing but this seems like the kind of thing you write stoned one day and save for a time you need to beat a deadline. Or, after you just bought stock in maps?
 
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4. Re: Sunday Mobilization Jun 9, 2019, 19:18 RedEye9
 
MeanJim wrote on Jun 9, 2019, 18:52:
I can't read the article because ....
here you go, I have a subscription

It has become the most natural thing to do: get in the car, type a destination into a smartphone, and let an algorithm using GPS data show the way. Personal GPS-equipped devices entered the mass market in only the past 15 or so years, but hundreds of millions of people now rarely travel without them. These gadgets are extremely powerful, allowing people to know their location at all times, to explore unknown places and to avoid getting lost.

But they also affect perception and judgment. When people are told which way to turn, it relieves them of the need to create their own routes and remember them. They pay less attention to their surroundings. And neuroscientists can now see that brain behavior changes when people rely on turn-by-turn directions.

In a study published in Nature Communications in 2017, researchers asked subjects to navigate a virtual simulation of London’s Soho neighborhood and monitored their brain activity, specifically the hippocampus, which is integral to spatial navigation. Those who were guided by directions showed less activity in this part of the brain than participants who navigated without the device. “The hippocampus makes an internal map of the environment and this map becomes active only when you are engaged in navigating and not using GPS,” Amir-Homayoun Javadi, one of the study’s authors, told me.

The hippocampus is crucial to many aspects of daily life. It allows us to orient in space and know where we are by creating cognitive maps. It also allows us to recall events from the past, what is known as episodic memory. And, remarkably, it is the part of the brain that neuroscientists believe gives us the ability to imagine ourselves in the future.

Studies have long shown the hippocampus is highly susceptible to experience. (London’s taxi drivers famously have greater gray-matter volume in the hippocampus as a consequence of memorizing the city’s labyrinthine streets.) Meanwhile, atrophy in that part of the brain is linked to devastating conditions, including post-traumatic stress disorder and Alzheimer’s disease. Stress and depression have been shown to dampen neurogenesis — the growth of new neurons — in the hippocampal circuit.

What isn’t known is the effect of GPS use on hippocampal function when employed daily over long periods of time. Javadi said the conclusions he draws from recent studies is that “when people use tools such as GPS, they tend to engage less with navigation. Therefore, brain area responsible for navigation is less used, and consequently their brain areas involved in navigation tend to shrink.”

How people navigate naturally changes with age. Navigation aptitude appears to peak around age 19, and after that, most people slowly stop using spatial memory strategies to find their way, relying on habit instead. But neuroscientist Véronique Bohbot has found that using spatial-memory strategies for navigation correlates with increased gray matter in the hippocampus at any age. She thinks that interventions focused on improving spatial memory by exercising the hippocampus — paying attention to the spatial relationships of places in our environment — might help offset age-related cognitive impairments or even neurodegenerative diseases.

“If we are paying attention to our environment, we are stimulating our hippocampus, and a bigger hippocampus seems to be protective against Alzheimer’s disease,” Bohbot told me in an email. “When we get lost, it activates the hippocampus, it gets us completely out of the habit mode. Getting lost is good!” Done safely, getting lost could be a good thing.

Saturated with devices, children today might grow up to see navigation from memory or a paper map as anachronistic as rote memorization or typewriting. But for them especially, independent navigation and the freedom to explore are vital to acquiring spatial knowledge that may improve hippocampal function. Turning off the GPS and teaching them navigational skills could have enormous cognitive benefits later in life.

There are other compelling reasons outside of neuroscience to consider forgoing the GPS.
Over the past four years, I’ve spoken with master navigators from different cultures who showed me that practicing navigation is a powerful form of engagement with the environment that can inspire a greater sense of stewardship. Finding our way on our own — using perception, empirical observation and problem-solving skills — forces us to attune ourselves to the world. And by turning our attention to the physical landscape that sustains and connects us, we can nourish “topophilia,” a sense of attachment and love for place. You’ll never get that from waiting for a satellite to tell you how to find a shortcut.
 
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3. Re: Sunday Mobilization Jun 9, 2019, 18:52 MeanJim
 
I can't read the article because the site says I'm browsing in private mode, which I'm not (I am blocking trackers and 3rd party cookies), so fuck them for trying to spy on me.

Anyway, I imagine the article says it's due to people not learning how to read maps or something. While that's true, you should know how to navigate with a map, getting lost and ending up in a bad part of a city, getting mugged or worse is a good reason to use a GPS. Even with paper maps, roads are constantly changing and you need to make sure your map is up to date. An out of date paper map is just as bad as an out of date map in a GPS.

I don't travel much anymore, but I never used a GPS until after 2005 or so. I used to drive cross country even without a map. Before Google, I would print directions out using Yahoo or MapQuest, but those weren't always right, yet I somehow always made it where I was going.

I finally decided to get a GPS when coming home from a trip in Wisconsin. Going through the Chicago area, I got slightly lost because they apparently don't believe in road signs to tell you what lanes go which way. I was heading south, but the highway suddenly split two ways while going around a corner with no signs telling you which lane went which direction. I stayed in the right lane, which I assumed would continue south, but it did that weird shit where it crisscrosses and the right lanes turn left and left lanes turn right and I instead ended up going east into Indiana before I could get off and turn around. I got back on the highway heading west, which would take me to the highway going south, but once again with no signage or warnings the highway divided off into three separate parallel 2-lane highways. There was a concrete divider between the lanes, so I couldn't switch and the lane I was stuck in turned back north into the city, taking me through a toll both where I had to pay $12 just to get off and turn around again.
 
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2. Re: Sunday Mobilization Jun 9, 2019, 14:46 Cutter
 
As someone who prefers to drive side roads and back roads and such you can have my GPS when you pry if from my ruined dead fingers or something. Not to mention I'm getting back into backtrail hiking and camping and GPS can be a literal lifesaver. Yeah, you should still have a map and compass and know how to use them but GPS' are the bee's knees.  
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"Ah, Impressionists, the boy bands of the art world." - Sideshow Bob
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1. Re: Sunday Mobilization Jun 9, 2019, 13:26 Dev
 
I couldn't get around without printing out maps before the GPS days. My brains already ruined I guess. Because no way am I going to stop using it.  
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