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DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite

The Stardock Forums reproduce a DMCA takedown notice submitted by Paul Reiche III and Fred Ford against Star Control: Origins, which results in the space strategy game no longer being sold on Steam or GOG.com. Ford and Reiche designed the original Star Control, and though Stardock acquired rights to the game from Atari back in 2013, questions surfaced almost immediately about what aspects of the series they do and do not own. Around a year ago Ford and Reiche raised their first legal objection to Stardock's continuation of the series, leading to lawsuits flying back and forth. The last we heard of this the pair was collecting for a legal fund, so further legal action should be no surprise. Here's the gist of their complaint: "Stardock Systems, Inc. dba Stardock Entertainment ("Stardock") claims to be the assignee for the name 'Star Control,' but is not authorized to publish, reproduce, prepare derivative works based on, or distribute the Works." In a post on Steam, Stardock's Bard Wardell gives the other side of the story, suggesting the takedown is an unprecedented abuse of the DMCA, that Steam and GOG.com automatically pull games upon receiving such notices, and that Valve assures them those who already own the game can still play it. He says they are working to make the game available for purchase once again, but that they will have to lay off support staff in the meantime:

Unfortunately, rather than relying on the legal system to resolve this, they have chosen to bypass it by issuing vague DMCA take-down notices to Steam and GOG (who, btw, Reiche and Ford are suing using GoFundMe money).

Steam and GOG both have a policy of taking down content that receive DMCA notices regardless of the merits of the claims.

To my knowledge, never in the history of our industry has anyone attempted to use the DMCA system to take down a shipping game before. For example, when PubG sued Fortnite for copyright infringement, they didn't try to take Fortnite down with a DMCA notice.

For those not familiar with copyright law, you CANNOT copyright ideas, individual or short phrases, concepts, mechanics, game designs, etc.

Star Control: Origins does not contain any copyrighted work of Reiche or Ford. We spent 5 years working on it making it our own game. It very much plays like you would expect a Star Control game. But that has nothing to do with copyright.

Stardock, for the record, owns the trademark to Star Control and the copyright to Star Control 3 and Star Control: Origins has nothing to do with Reche and Ford.

Valve assures us that anyone who has already bought the game should be able to continue to play it.

Unfortunately, without the income from Star Control: Origins, Stardock will have to lay off some of the men and women who are assigned to the game.

We will do our very best to continue to support the game and hopefully Star Control: Origins will return as soon as possible.

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60. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 4, 2019, 21:05 FloorPie
 
Mondosapien wrote on Jan 3, 2019, 14:51:
Kxmode wrote on Jan 3, 2019, 02:41:
Bottom line: Paul and Fred own the copyright on two products that no one but they can touch. Meanwhile, Stardock owns the IP and exclusive rights to the name for everything else and can create games inspired by the ideas presented in Star Control 1 and 2.

This is a well-informed post, but there are a few points you've left out that make the issue less clear. First, Paul & Fred claim that SC1 and SC2 IP reverted to them when the licencing agreement they had with Accolade expired in April 2001, meaning Stardock couldn't have purchased the IP because Atari didn't own it. This is probably the most important part of the entire issue, and unfortunately we have to wait for the courts to decide the outcome.

As for the question of copyright protection, you are right that you can't copyright an idea. But as I understand it, you can copyright an expression of an idea. So, the idea of a "toy that transforms from a vehicle into a robot" can't be copyrighted, but a "boombox that transforms into an evil robot named Soundwave" is protected. I bet you won't find xenomorphs or WALL-E anywhere in Star Control: Origins. That's exactly what Stardock did. They included Arilou aliens. They look like Arilou, the behave like Arilou, and the are named Arilou. It can be argued that the Arilou are generic enough to not be covered by copyright, but again, that's not as clear cut as you make it out to be. I think Stardock is playing a game of "I'm not touching you" by including Arilou, and they may get burnt. We'll see what the courts say.

With these two points to consider, I think it's extreme to call Paul & Fred delusional.

Wait, didn't Atari get in trouble back in 2010 or 2013 for selling Star Control 1/2 on GOG without any royalties and then settled with Paul and Fred for x% of royalties for games sold on GOG? Then they had a battle with Stardock when they tried to sell those games on GOG?

If Atari didn't own it via Accolade since 2001 (and P&F released the source code to SC2 in 2002), how can they justify settling for royalties when they own all the IP at that point?
 
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59. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 3, 2019, 14:51 Mondosapien
 
Kxmode wrote on Jan 3, 2019, 02:41:
Bottom line: Paul and Fred own the copyright on two products that no one but they can touch. Meanwhile, Stardock owns the IP and exclusive rights to the name for everything else and can create games inspired by the ideas presented in Star Control 1 and 2.

This is a well-informed post, but there are a few points you've left out that make the issue less clear. First, Paul & Fred claim that SC1 and SC2 IP reverted to them when the licencing agreement they had with Accolade expired in April 2001, meaning Stardock couldn't have purchased the IP because Atari didn't own it. This is probably the most important part of the entire issue, and unfortunately we have to wait for the courts to decide the outcome.

As for the question of copyright protection, you are right that you can't copyright an idea. But as I understand it, you can copyright an expression of an idea. So, the idea of a "toy that transforms from a vehicle into a robot" can't be copyrighted, but a "boombox that transforms into an evil robot named Soundwave" is protected. I bet you won't find xenomorphs or WALL-E anywhere in Star Control: Origins. That's exactly what Stardock did. They included Arilou aliens. They look like Arilou, the behave like Arilou, and the are named Arilou. It can be argued that the Arilou are generic enough to not be covered by copyright, but again, that's not as clear cut as you make it out to be. I think Stardock is playing a game of "I'm not touching you" by including Arilou, and they may get burnt. We'll see what the courts say.

With these two points to consider, I think it's extreme to call Paul & Fred delusional.
 
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58. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 3, 2019, 02:41 Kxmode
 
The following was posted on July 21, 2013 by Brad on the Stardock forums.

It won't be a continuation but more akin to a revisit (ala XCOM using Star Control 2 as the inspiration and start back before the earthlings were in any kind of slave shield). We'll be talking more about our plans as we go forward.

We won't be making any changes to the existing Star Control games. And Atari doesn't actually own the copyright on Star Control 1/2 so it's not like one could make a Star Control 2 HD or what have you without a license from Paul Reiche. And even if we did have rights to SC 1/2 I wouldn't touch them without his blessing.

I think what most Star Control fans are looking for is a new Star Control game where the inspiration comes from Star Control 2. They want a game with fun, adventure and top down ship battles like in Star Control 2 that all play within a fun sci fi universe. Preferably one with Ur-Quan and Spathi and lots of insults.

Ford and Reiche expressed many times over the past two decades a desire to reenter the Star Control universe, but the difficulty has always been acquiring the rights to the name, which were held by Accolade. I am sure this is something Chris Roberts is familiar with, which is why he opted to create a new Wing Commander universe with another name.

So let's take a trip down IP lane starting from Accolade. In April 1999, Accolade was acquired by Infogrames Entertainment for a combined sum of US$60 million (at that time, Infogrames owned the IP, rights, and Star Control name). The copyright for Star Control 1 and 2 remained with Ford and Reiche. In May 2009, Infogrames announced that it would change its corporate name to the Atari (at that time, Atari owned the IP, rights, and Star Control name). Meanwhile, the copyright for Star Control 1 and 2 remained with Ford and Reiche. In July 2013, Atari began to sell its game assets, the famous tripod logo, and the Atari name in a large auction. Outside the sale, Ford and Reiche continued to have copyright ownership of Star Control 1 and 2. A few highlights of the deal include:

- Rebellion Developments bought the Battlezone and MoonBase Commander games,
- Epic Gear bought The Backyard Sports franchise,
- Tommo acquired Humongous Inc. and over 100 different games (including games from the companies Accolade and MicroProse, and Math Grand Prix),
- Wargaming purchased Total Annihilation,
- Stardock bought Star Control

Through the IP trip, Stardock eventually became the legal owner of the IP, rights, and name: Star Control. What they did not, nor did any other business through the trip, ever own is the copyright on Star Control I and II. It remains with Paul Reiche III and Fred Ford until the copyright becomes public domain.

It is clear from the purchase and from what Brad wrote that he knew to buy the rights to Star Control came with limitations in that his company did not have permission to touch Star Control 1 and 2. However, under section 102 (b) of the United State's Copyright Law, it states: "In no case does copyright protection for an original work of authorship extend to any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery, regardless of the form in which it is described, explained, illustrated, or embodied in such work."

"Regardless of the form" means the user interface (one of the things Paul and Fred are arguing SC:O violated) and not covered by copyright law. It's one reason why so many websites look the same despite the fact there's a copyright notice at the bottom, or phones started looking like iPhones. You can't copyright an interface. As this article notes, a patent is the best option for copyrighting an interface (and even then there are limitations).

The exemption of ideas is also why for over a hundred years there have always been legal knockoffs. It has blessed us with a stream of FPS clones, then WOW/MMORPG clones, then MOBA clones, then trading card game clones, battle royale clones, and so on. It's given us Gobots and Yu-Gi-Oh. And the list is endless.

Star Control: Origins is inspired by Star Control 1 or 2. That is well within the exclusive right Stardock has of the game. Conversely, if Paul Reiche III and Fred Ford wanted to make a follow-up Star Control game, and call it Star Control, they legally cannot. They would have to license the rights to use the name from Stardock, which, judging by the delusional actions, is likely to be a "No" from Stardock.

The IANAL conclusion is clear-cut. Paul Reiche III and Fred Ford are delusional if they believe striking a DMCA notice on a product legally owned by Stardock with the rights they possess isn't going to have dire consequences on them. Conversely, perhaps they know that, and the move is a hell mary driven by rage and ego.

Bottom line: Paul and Fred own the copyright on two products that no one but they can touch. Meanwhile, Stardock owns the IP and exclusive rights to the name for everything else and can create games inspired by the ideas presented in Star Control 1 and 2.
 
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57. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 23:12 Dev
 
Mondosapien wrote on Jan 2, 2019, 13:31:
[...]
You are right, I was a bit dismissive. Maybe I shouldn't have been, but I do think some parts are worthy of it.

Such as the part where I quoted the judge and was saying "In other words, he didn't believe they'd just remove it." I was talking about VALVE immediately taking the game down when they got the DMCA. Its incredibly rare for anyone to keep something up after getting a DMCA (and sometimes not even restoring it after the counter notice), so that's why I'm dismissive of the belief that valve wouldn't do that.
That's the entire section starting on page 12 titled "Defendants’ Issuance of a DMCA Notice is Not an Injunction"
And then further in part "b) Irreparable Harm " page 18.

Then the judge made a completely separate point about how doing this injunction denial didn't mean the two guys would automatically jump to a DMCA.

Both of these points from the judge were immediately proven wrong... again, which is why I'm a bit dismissive.

The second point maybe I was reading too much between the lines, but things like this is what brought it to my thoughts:

4. The Anticipated DMCA Notice
Stardock anticipates that Reiche and Ford will send DMCA notices to GOG
[...]
Stardock anticipates that
Reiche and Ford will send DMCA notices to GOG and Valve regarding Origins, resulting
in its removal from those distribution platforms. Consequently, Stardock filed the instant
motion for preliminary injunction to enjoin Reiche and Ford from sending further DMCA
notices directed to material that is the subject of the present ligation and, in particular,
Origins. Having read and considered the papers filed in connection with this matter and
being fully informed, the Court hereby DENIES the motion, for the reasons stated below.
[...]
Stardock asserts that, if a DMCA notice is issued, Origins “will have been
promoted and released,” but (seemingly operating under the assumption that GOG and
Valve will remove the game from their platforms) it will no longer be available for
purchase or play on the distributors’ platforms.
[...]
Contrary
to Plaintiff’s assertion, see Mot. at 13, Defendants cannot “unilaterally” block Origins or
any other content from distribution by issuing a DMCA notice.
[...]
Furthermore, Plaintiff’s claim that third party service providers such as GOG and
Valve act instinctively to remove material claimed to be infringing, regardless of the merits
of the claim, is overstated and without basis

So to sum up, maybe that 2nd point there's not enough to be clear, so we can dismiss that 2nd point. But that first point I feel is still pretty strong

And I agree with much of your take you summarized in how things fell out, but I still think stardock will come ahead and that it will hinge on if the royalty agreement is still in place.
 
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56. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 13:31 Mondosapien
 
I appreciate that you went to the source document to pull quotes, however you believe you know more than the judge, and therefore dismiss her expert opinion on a whim. That's very convenient in arguments like this! Also, it's not great to put words in her mouth ("they can't be that much of a jerk") and offer no quotes to support that. I didn't read anything like that in the source.

Again, Stardock filed an injunction to stop Paul & Ford from using DMCA as it was intended. The judge explained that an injunction can't be used that way under current law, and therefore denied it.


Dev wrote on Jan 2, 2019, 08:52:
In other words, he didn't believe they'd just remove it. Which is weird, because that's exactly how DMCA works. So this judge doesn't appear to know much about how DMCA works in reality.
Nowhere does the judge say she doesn't believe a DMCA notice will be issued. She says that the possibility of a DMCA does not meet the threshold for an injunction, and that an injunction at this point would contradict status quo:
Defendants (Paule & Ford) argue that the requested injunction would upset the status quo, not preserve it. Tellingly, Plaintiff (Stardock) does not respond to this argument. This is fatal to its motion for preliminary injunction.

And as for the irreparable harm stuff, the judge makes it quite clear by quoting precedence:
“If the harm complained of is self-inflicted, it does not qualify as irreparable.” Caplan v. Fellheimer Eichen Braverman & Kaskey, 68 F.3d 828, 839 (3d Cir. 1995)
Stardock released their game fully aware of the pending litigation. They thought they could get away with it, and failed.
[T]he Court is disinclined to extricate Plaintiff from a peril of its own making.



The Stardock link that describes their side of the issue is of course biased. If anyone would like to read a little of Paul & Ford's side, check out their page: https://dogarandkazon.squarespace.com/

It's impossible to know for sure what motivates people, but this is my current take on the situation:
  • Bard Wardell, a huge fan of Star Control 2, bought what he believed was the complete Star Control universe from Atari.
  • When Brad reached out to Paul & Ford to collaborate, he discovered (and acknowledged) he only bought the trademark along with the chum from the shitty Star Control 3 game, and couldn't use any of the characters from Star Control 2.
  • In an effort to make the game he envisioned, Brad repeatedly asked Paul & Ford to collaborate, and they repeatedly refused. (They harbored intentions to make their own successor.)
  • Being denied, Brad tried to recover from his mistake by offering Paul & Ford the opportunity to buy the trademark and Star Control 3 chum for the same price he paid. Paul & Ford refused to buy the shit sandwich as it isn't necessary to make their own Star Control 2 successor.
  • Brad, pissed off and disappointed, changed his tune and said he could use the characters from Star Control 2 and Paul & Ford couldn't stop him.
  • Brad begins waging a legal and PR battle with Paul & Ford.


  • To summarize, a few relatively small creators wanted to continue creating without the interference of Brad Wardell. Brad couldn't take rejection, and escalated the issue. You may disagree with the tactics Paul & Ford use, but they are fighting someone who doesn't pull punches. Ultimately we'll have to wait to see what the courts decide, but if the December 27 2018 ruling is any indication, Stardock is talking a big game without any real merit.
     
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    55. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 13:25 Parallax Abstraction
     
    I did a podcast on this issue that I just released.

    It doesn't go too far into weeds on the nature of the dispute (some long videos are linked in the description that go into exhaustive detail about this) but it's more of an appeal to both sides to figure this out, as a hardcore Star Control fan and someone who actually did very much like Origins. I kind of take both Brad Wardell and Paul & Fred to task for what I see as their respective missteps in this.
     
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    54. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 13:10 FloorPie
     
    Yeah, so... there is this (taken from the previous BN post last year):

    Skylanders toy company
     
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    53. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 10:53 Darks
     
    I thought Stardock bought this IP and owns it? So how is it hes two guys are able to try and lay claim to this game?

    And does anyone like or play this game? I tried it out and did not care for it at all.
     
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    52. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 10:02 jdreyer
     
    Dev wrote on Jan 2, 2019, 08:52:
    VaranDragon wrote on Jan 2, 2019, 06:23:
    Dev wrote on Jan 2, 2019, 02:08:
    IANAL

    Wut?
    A common acronym meaning I Am Not A Lawyer

    Not to be confused with the completely different phrase, I<3ANAL.

     
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    The land in Minecraft is flat, Minecraft simulates the Earth, ergo the Earth is flat.
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    51. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 09:45 The Pyro
     
    EDIT: comment removed because I probably don't know what I'm talking about

    This comment was edited on Jan 2, 2019, 15:04.
     
    Avatar 6134
     
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    50. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 09:39 Beamer
     
    It's kind of fun how evenly this place is split into "Side A is being huge assholes here" and "Side B is being huge assholes here!"

    Maybe both are being somewhat understandable assholes?
     
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    49. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 09:30 eRe4s3r
     
    RedEye9 wrote on Jan 1, 2019, 19:32:
    Parallax Abstraction wrote on Jan 1, 2019, 17:57:
    In the end, the courts will determine who is right. At least I have my copy of Origins in the mean time.
    gog ain't pulled it yet
    https://www.gog.com/game/star_control_origins

    It's most deffo pulled now
     
    Avatar 54727
     
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    48. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 08:52 Dev
     
    Mondosapien wrote on Jan 1, 2019, 22:43:
    Four days before this post (December 27th 2018), Stardock was denied a preliminary injunction that would have prevented Paul & Ford from issuing the DMCA.

    http://wiki.uqm.stack.nl/images/f/fa/102_Order.pdf

    I will note that the judge you liked, said as an argument that
    As a threshold
    matter, the Court finds Plaintiff’s evidence in support of its claim of irreparable injury
    wanting. Plaintiff’s claim depends on the unsupported assumption that GOG and Valve
    will remove Origins upon receipt of a DMCA notice of infringement.
    And
    Furthermore, Plaintiff’s claim that third party service providers such as GOG and
    Valve act instinctively to remove material claimed to be infringing, regardless of the merits
    of the claim, is overstated and without basis

    In other words, he didn't believe they'd just remove it. Which is weird, because that's exactly how DMCA works. So this judge doesn't appear to know much about how DMCA works in reality. Even though he talks about the safe harbor!

    And he says something along the lines of "surely just because I don't stop them from doing a DMCA, doesn't mean they will immediately go file one, they can't be that much of a jerk." Uh yes they can and did. Within days.

    Stardock did fail here, in not showing the cases where valve removed things from this type stuff in the past. ALSO, in not showing that valve is just generally lazy anyway and wants to take the easy way out... Though I don't know how one would prove that!

    The judge also argues that even if stardock suffered harm, no big deal, they could get it back as damages... AHHAAHAHAHAH. I sincerely doubt that the two guys have millions of bucks in assets ready to be paid out as damages.

    The judge appears to be naive.

    Also apparently neither side's lawyers bothered to read the rules for that jurisdiction. They both had like 70 pages of filings thrown out because they submitted them separately without asking and far over the tiny 5 page limits.

    This comment was edited on Jan 2, 2019, 09:06.
     
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    47. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 08:52 Dev
     
    VaranDragon wrote on Jan 2, 2019, 06:23:
    Dev wrote on Jan 2, 2019, 02:08:
    IANAL

    Wut?
    A common acronym meaning I Am Not A Lawyer

    ForgedReality wrote on Jan 2, 2019, 04:03:
    Dev wrote on Jan 1, 2019, 19:28:
    RaZ0r! wrote on Jan 1, 2019, 18:53:
    I never played the first one, but apparently I missed the charm of it as the new one is really boring to me. Seems like a really niche game to make a big fuss over, but again I'm not looking at it with nostalgia.
    So go play it then! They released the source code, and the original composers came back to remake all the music. A fantastic version of SC2. And it still plays well.

    http://sc2.sourceforge.net/
    Ur quan masters


    ...That's not the first one.
    There's not much of a game to the first one. But if you want it, I'm sure it's out there. I believe it's been given away for free sometimes.
    As I recall it's mostly just an endless supermelee game, one battle after another until you "win"
    You basically have star control 1 inside star control 2 with the supermelee mode.

    Edit for screenshots and a review:
    https://www.mobygames.com/game/star-control/screenshots
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0gD75YjDis

    This comment was edited on Jan 2, 2019, 09:03.
     
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    46. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 08:10 Ozmodan
     
    Just Ford and Reiche being complete assholes. Anyone who contributed to their GoFundMe account is also an asshole.  
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    45. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 06:23 VaranDragon
     
    Dev wrote on Jan 2, 2019, 02:08:
    IANAL

    Wut?
     
    Avatar 58327
     
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    44. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 05:06 El Pit
     
    So Star Control is a trademark? Then just call it something else like Star Wars. Since it is "Origins" and a re-start of the franchise, you might call it Star Wars: Episode 1. Problem solved!  
    They're waiting for you, Gabe, in the test chamber!
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    43. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 04:03 ForgedReality
     
    Dev wrote on Jan 1, 2019, 19:28:
    RaZ0r! wrote on Jan 1, 2019, 18:53:
    I never played the first one, but apparently I missed the charm of it as the new one is really boring to me. Seems like a really niche game to make a big fuss over, but again I'm not looking at it with nostalgia.
    So go play it then! They released the source code, and the original composers came back to remake all the music. A fantastic version of SC2. And it still plays well.

    http://sc2.sourceforge.net/
    Ur quan masters


    ...That's not the first one.
     
    Avatar 55267
     
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    42. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 04:02 ForgedReality
     
    I really wish we had Ghosts instead of this cartoon abomination. Thanks, lawyers.  
    Avatar 55267
     
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    41. Re: DMCA Notice Freezes Star Control Origins in Carbonite Jan 2, 2019, 02:08 Dev
     
    Text for your Link
    If anyone hasn't seen this stardock posted Q&A yet (I hadn't) it's a must read.

    It has the actual emails exchanged between the two guys and Brad.
    In addition the cost they paid for the rights (something between $300k and $400k).
    There's a lot of good info, especially between the lines.
    Brad even offered in 2013 to sell all the rights to them at his cost if they were going to make a game, out of respect for them as a game designer. They didn't bother to say anything until 4 years later in development, after stardock had sunk millions in development.

    Note: I think the REAL reason the original IP wasn't used (although respect was mentioned), was the agreement stardock purchased includes that a 10% royalty must be paid to the two guys if they did use the original aliens IP. He was trying to negotiate a smaller royalty for cameo or DLC.

    Also looks like the 2 guys are claiming there were some royalty payments skipped by Accolade, which invalidated the agreements. This may be the piece upon which the whole case hinges. However if they were cashing royalty checks (even if there were pauses), that action may imply legally it's active.

    I think the two guys got all butthurt at the proposal Brad was sending them as an outline of a formal agreement to share. But that's exactly that kinda thing looks like. And I bet parts were negotiable. The alternative is to do what many companies do and just shut down fan projects. Instead, the two guys used a nuclear option to stop the sales of star control

    Only the lawyers are going to win in this fight. The IP apparently wasn't valuable enough to be a big hit, so this isn't hundreds of millions at stake. It's a few million, that apparently doesn't even pay off the cost of development. And whoever "wins" is probably going to totally shut down the other side. This move by the two guys may have just insured they can NEVER do a true sequel. Or if it goes the other way, that Origins doesn't get any more patches or development or content for the season pass. Rather than both coexisting and me getting to buy multiple star control games after years of none. It's a sad squabble over scraps that tarnishes the memories of a wonderful game.

    IANAL

    This comment was edited on Jan 2, 2019, 02:24.
     
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