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Out of the Blue

Today is World AIDS Day. Word is the theme this year is "Increasing Impact through Transparency, Accountability, and Partnerships." The UNAIDS website offers some statistics to illustrate why this is such an important cause:

GLOBAL HIV STATISTICS

  • 20.9 million people were accessing antiretroviral therapy in June 2017.
  • 36.7 million [30.8 million–42.9 million] people globally were living with HIV in 2016.
  • 1.8 million [1.6 million–2.1 million] people became newly infected with HIV in 2016.
  • 1 million [830 000–1.2 million] people died from AIDS-related illnesses in 2016.
  • 76.1 million [65.2 million–88.0 million] people have become infected with HIV since the start of the epidemic.
  • 35.0 million [28.9 million–41.5 million] people have died from AIDS-related illnesses since the start of the epidemic.

Links: Thanks Ant.
Play: City Drifting.
Story: Guy paints his own arrows on the road, in hopes of speeding up his commute.
Science: Dogs Are Brainier Than Cats, New Study Finds. I actually wouldn't have predicted that. Thanks RedEye9.
Media: BATMAN NINJA - Japanese Trailer English Subs.
UNDERTALE - Part 1 (React- Let's Plays).
Unlocking Tetris in a Russian car.
Rick and Morty: The Story You Never Knew.

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27 Replies. 2 pages. Viewing page 1.
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27. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 2, 2017, 15:27 El Pit
 
Blue wrote on Dec 2, 2017, 15:10:
El Pit wrote on Dec 2, 2017, 11:25:
WOW! Neil Young has released his complete works FOR FREE (until some time next year) on the internet. Just WOW! I own a lot of his albums but will definitely go and see if there is some stuff in his career that I have missed up to now.

http://www.neilyoungarchives.com

And no Pono required!!!!

No, I guess Neil learned that lesson the hard way, Blue.

But he is streaming his music at high bitrate (if your bandwidth allows it). It sound really well played via my receiver.
 
They're waiting for you, Gabe, in the test chamber!
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26. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 2, 2017, 15:10  Blue 
 
El Pit wrote on Dec 2, 2017, 11:25:
WOW! Neil Young has released his complete works FOR FREE (until some time next year) on the internet. Just WOW! I own a lot of his albums but will definitely go and see if there is some stuff in his career that I have missed up to now.

http://www.neilyoungarchives.com

And no Pono required!!!!
 
Avatar 2
 
Stephen "Blue" Heaslip
Blue's News Publisher, Editor-in-Chief, El Presidente for Life
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25. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 2, 2017, 11:25 El Pit
 
WOW! Neil Young has released his complete works FOR FREE (until some time next year) on the internet. Just WOW! I own a lot of his albums but will definitely go and see if there is some stuff in his career that I have missed up to now.

http://www.neilyoungarchives.com
 
They're waiting for you, Gabe, in the test chamber!
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24. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 22:49 BobBob
 
Cutter wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 22:38:
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 17:31:
Cutter wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 17:26:
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 16:11:
An ethical / legal scenario and question:

Someone stole a winning lottery number and somehow took the multi-million dollar cash prize and started a controversial company that hired 1000s of people. Then the company went public on the stock exchange. Later on ... The lotto commission finds the person committed fraud. The real winner didn't get his/her multi-million award. What can or should be done about that?

That's felony fraud anyway you slice it. Yeah, arrest him, seize all his assets - you're not allowed to profit from crime anyway. Legally, the lottery corporation (State) is obligated to make good on their contract - that's what a lottery ticket is, monies exchanged for a promise of payment in the event of a win. So technically speaking they still owe the winner the money, not the thief.

That being said, the onus is on the State to go after the thief. It's felony fraud and theft so that's prison time right there. And you can't profit in the commission of a crime so that means all his assets seized as well, regardless of how many people he's put to work. Define controversial. It's not about the number of people employed vs. what the nature of the work is. Regardless the likely outcome would be to either sell the company, or more likely dissolve it and sell the assets to recoup as much money as possible.

You do realize the scenario in question is an allegory, right? Stunned

No, you asked a question. That's not what an allegory is. And how it would be resolved is exactly as I stated.

"An allegory is a story, poem, or painting in which the characters and events are symbols of something else. Allegories are often moral, religious, or political."

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/us/dictionary/english/allegory

Huh
 
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23. removed Dec 1, 2017, 22:42 Cutter
 
* REMOVED *
This comment was deleted on Dec 2, 2017, 00:00.
 
Avatar 25394
 
You've got to be cruel to be kind...in the right measure.
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22. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 22:38 Cutter
 
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 17:31:
Cutter wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 17:26:
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 16:11:
An ethical / legal scenario and question:

Someone stole a winning lottery number and somehow took the multi-million dollar cash prize and started a controversial company that hired 1000s of people. Then the company went public on the stock exchange. Later on ... The lotto commission finds the person committed fraud. The real winner didn't get his/her multi-million award. What can or should be done about that?

That's felony fraud anyway you slice it. Yeah, arrest him, seize all his assets - you're not allowed to profit from crime anyway. Legally, the lottery corporation (State) is obligated to make good on their contract - that's what a lottery ticket is, monies exchanged for a promise of payment in the event of a win. So technically speaking they still owe the winner the money, not the thief.

That being said, the onus is on the State to go after the thief. It's felony fraud and theft so that's prison time right there. And you can't profit in the commission of a crime so that means all his assets seized as well, regardless of how many people he's put to work. Define controversial. It's not about the number of people employed vs. what the nature of the work is. Regardless the likely outcome would be to either sell the company, or more likely dissolve it and sell the assets to recoup as much money as possible.

You do realize the scenario in question is an allegory, right? Stunned

No, you asked a question. You don't even know what an allegory is. And how it would be resolved is exactly as I stated. Don't bother asking if you can't even master rudimentary grammar.

 
Avatar 25394
 
You've got to be cruel to be kind...in the right measure.
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21. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 21:52 Mr. Tact
 
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 16:11:
An ethical / legal scenario and question:

Someone stole a winning lottery number and somehow took the multi-million dollar cash prize and started a controversial company that hired 1000s of people. Then the company went public on the stock exchange. Later on ... The lotto commission finds the person committed fraud. The real winner didn't get his/her multi-million award. What can or should be done about that?
Easy. Trumps pardons the thief, end of story.
 
Truth is brutal. Prepare for pain.
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20. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 21:46 1badmf
 
jdreyer wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 17:10:
1badmf wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 16:44:
RedEye9 wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 15:55:
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 15:36:
Will Flynn's testimony be the Achilles' heel? Inquisitive
Hopefully, Mueller is just getting started. This is just the first cut of a thousand cuts.

he's already stated he went to the russians at the direction of higher ups in the campaign. mueller will have a nice collection of heads after this, probably trump's if the gop has a shred of decency left.

"Higher ups" = Jared Kushner, in this case.

a family member at least. i wouldn't be sad to see mrs. ivanka go to federal pound-me-in-the-ass prison. i do legitimately have doubts as to whether trump himself knowingly colluded, but he's certainly guilty of obstruction of justice. it's just a matter of if the GOP will impeach him or if they'll actually put party ahead of country and expose the party's black soul for all to see.
 
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19. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 19:02 RedEye9
 
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 17:31:
Cutter wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 17:26:
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 16:11:
An ethical / legal scenario and question:

Someone stole a winning lottery number and somehow took the multi-million dollar cash prize and started a controversial company that hired 1000s of people. Then the company went public on the stock exchange. Later on ... The lotto commission finds the person committed fraud. The real winner didn't get his/her multi-million award. What can or should be done about that?

That's felony fraud anyway you slice it. Yeah, arrest him, seize all his assets - you're not allowed to profit from crime anyway. Legally, the lottery corporation (State) is obligated to make good on their contract - that's what a lottery ticket is, monies exchanged for a promise of payment in the event of a win. So technically speaking they still owe the winner the money, not the thief.

That being said, the onus is on the State to go after the thief. It's felony fraud and theft so that's prison time right there. And you can't profit in the commission of a crime so that means all his assets seized as well, regardless of how many people he's put to work. Define controversial. It's not about the number of people employed vs. what the nature of the work is. Regardless the likely outcome would be to either sell the company, or more likely dissolve it and sell the assets to recoup as much money as possible.

You do realize the scenario in question is an allegory, right? Stunned
not only does he not realize that, he doesn't get the answer right either.
 
Avatar 58135
 
https://www.newyorker.com/humor/borowitz-report
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18. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 17:31 BobBob
 
Cutter wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 17:26:
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 16:11:
An ethical / legal scenario and question:

Someone stole a winning lottery number and somehow took the multi-million dollar cash prize and started a controversial company that hired 1000s of people. Then the company went public on the stock exchange. Later on ... The lotto commission finds the person committed fraud. The real winner didn't get his/her multi-million award. What can or should be done about that?

That's felony fraud anyway you slice it. Yeah, arrest him, seize all his assets - you're not allowed to profit from crime anyway. Legally, the lottery corporation (State) is obligated to make good on their contract - that's what a lottery ticket is, monies exchanged for a promise of payment in the event of a win. So technically speaking they still owe the winner the money, not the thief.

That being said, the onus is on the State to go after the thief. It's felony fraud and theft so that's prison time right there. And you can't profit in the commission of a crime so that means all his assets seized as well, regardless of how many people he's put to work. Define controversial. It's not about the number of people employed vs. what the nature of the work is. Regardless the likely outcome would be to either sell the company, or more likely dissolve it and sell the assets to recoup as much money as possible.

You do realize the scenario in question is an allegory, right? Stunned
 
Don't like my post? Submit a complaint
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17. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 17:29 Quboid
 
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 16:11:
An ethical / legal scenario and question:

Someone stole a winning lottery number and somehow took the multi-million dollar cash prize and started a controversial company that hired 1000s of people. Then the company went public on the stock exchange. Later on ... The lotto commission finds the person committed fraud. The real winner didn't get his/her multi-million award. What can or should be done about that?

Hi BobBob, long time no see.

I can't find information on it now, but I seem to remember that a few years ago a case was resolved in France about a valuable (I think worth over €100M) company that was acquired by fraud. The court cases took so long, the statute of limitations passed and the alleged (and fairly obviously guilty) perpetrators kept everything. Sorry I can't confirm the details, anyone else remember this?
 
Avatar 10439
 
"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing." - Edmund Burke
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16. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 17:26 Cutter
 
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 16:11:
An ethical / legal scenario and question:

Someone stole a winning lottery number and somehow took the multi-million dollar cash prize and started a controversial company that hired 1000s of people. Then the company went public on the stock exchange. Later on ... The lotto commission finds the person committed fraud. The real winner didn't get his/her multi-million award. What can or should be done about that?

That's felony fraud anyway you slice it. Yeah, arrest him, seize all his assets - you're not allowed to profit from crime anyway. Legally, the lottery corporation (State) is obligated to make good on their contract - that's what a lottery ticket is, monies exchanged for a promise of payment in the event of a win. So technically speaking they still owe the winner the money, not the thief.

That being said, the onus is on the State to go after the thief. It's felony fraud and theft so that's prison time right there. And you can't profit in the commission of a crime so that means all his assets seized as well, regardless of how many people he's put to work. Define controversial. It's not about the number of people employed vs. what the nature of the work is. Regardless the likely outcome would be to either sell the company, or more likely dissolve it and sell the assets to recoup as much money as possible.
 
Avatar 25394
 
You've got to be cruel to be kind...in the right measure.
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15. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 17:13 jdreyer
 
Guy paints his own arrows on the road, in hopes of speeding up his commute.

Who says the Chinese aren't innovative?
 
Avatar 22024
 
Stay a while, and listen.
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14. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 17:10 jdreyer
 
1badmf wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 16:44:
RedEye9 wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 15:55:
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 15:36:
Will Flynn's testimony be the Achilles' heel? Inquisitive
Hopefully, Mueller is just getting started. This is just the first cut of a thousand cuts.

he's already stated he went to the russians at the direction of higher ups in the campaign. mueller will have a nice collection of heads after this, probably trump's if the gop has a shred of decency left.

"Higher ups" = Jared Kushner, in this case.
 
Avatar 22024
 
Stay a while, and listen.
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13. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 16:44 1badmf
 
RedEye9 wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 15:55:
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 15:36:
Will Flynn's testimony be the Achilles' heel? Inquisitive
Hopefully, Mueller is just getting started. This is just the first cut of a thousand cuts.

he's already stated he went to the russians at the direction of higher ups in the campaign. mueller will have a nice collection of heads after this, probably trump's if the gop has a shred of decency left.
 
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12. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 16:28 Creston
 
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 16:11:
An ethical / legal scenario and question:

Someone stole a winning lottery number and somehow took the multi-million dollar cash prize and started a controversial company that hired 1000s of people. Then the company went public on the stock exchange. Later on ... The lotto commission finds the person committed fraud. The real winner didn't get his/her multi-million award. What can or should be done about that?

The person who stole the money has to pay it back (presumably not that hard, since he owns a company that employs thousands of people), then goes to jail. The official winner gets his money. The company stays in existence, minus its now-jailed CEO.

That's how the JUST way would go.

Here in the US, jack shit would happen to the guy, and the Republicans would quickly create a bill that prohibits CEOs from ever being accused of a crime ever again.
 
Avatar 15604
 
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11. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 16:11 BobBob
 
An ethical / legal scenario and question:

Someone stole a winning lottery number and somehow took the multi-million dollar cash prize and started a controversial company that hired 1000s of people. Then the company went public on the stock exchange. Later on ... The lotto commission finds the person committed fraud. The real winner didn't get his/her multi-million award. What can or should be done about that?
 
Don't like my post? Submit a complaint
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10. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 15:55 RedEye9
 
BobBob wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 15:36:
Will Flynn's testimony be the Achilles' heel? Inquisitive
Hopefully, Mueller is just getting started. This is just the first cut of a thousand cuts.
 
Avatar 58135
 
https://www.newyorker.com/humor/borowitz-report
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9. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 15:36 BobBob
 
Will Flynn's testimony be the Achilles' heel? Inquisitive  
Don't like my post? Submit a complaint
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8. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 1, 2017, 12:33 eRe4s3r
 
Nullity wrote on Dec 1, 2017, 12:15:
Dogs Are Brainier Than Cats, New Study Finds

That's only because cats dedicate the majority of their brain-power and intelligence towards being crazy assholes. There just isn't much left over for anything else.

Yeah I don't think you ever knew despair until you had a cat that had life figured out. And that meant it was an asshole in cat-form that wanted to own everything you owned and anything it couldn't have it would "accidentally" toss of a shelf or chew on or topple over.

But dogs are too much work (And cats know this)
 
Avatar 54727
 
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