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Out of the Blue

I'm doing better this morning after a slightly rough week. I mentioned waking up with a sore shoulder last week. This got to the point where I was waking up every time I needed to roll over in my sleep, as it seems my unconscious became aware this was how I was hurting myself, I was starting to run on the ragged edge from losing a couple of hours of sleep every day. This finally eased up last night, and I was able to sleep straight through the night for the first time in almost a week, which is quite a relief.

Achy Breaky Links: Thanks Ant and Acleacius.
Play: Burning Wheels Kitchen Rush.
Link: Critics Vote The 100 Greatest Comedies.
Stories: Joker Movie Is Depressingly Inevitable.
Hermit caught after 27 years in Maine woods. Thanks The Flying Penguin.
End of an Era: Village Voice Will No Longer Be in Print. A New York thing.
Science: Freeze-Frame: Paramount To Open The First Frozen Commercial Vault In The U.S.
Media: Space Station Transiting 2017 ECLIPSE, My Brain Stopped Working. Thanks Rhialto.
ADULTS PLAY SONIC MANIA! (React- Gaming).
Spinout Close Call At Kaitoke Intersection.

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39. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 26, 2017, 19:19 BobBob
 
Creston wrote on Aug 26, 2017, 17:58:
Oh, one more thing: Before you feed your doggie anything as a treat, make sure to check that it's safe for them to eat. Some of the weirdest things are absolutely toxic to them. A single raisin can kill your dog, for example.


Great point! I was at Trader Joe's and was looking at doggie treats. Some have a variety of ingredients, but one was pure beef liver. Isn't the beef liver the safest, being that's pure?
 
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38. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 26, 2017, 17:58 Creston
 
Oh, one more thing: Before you feed your doggie anything as a treat, make sure to check that it's safe for them to eat. Some of the weirdest things are absolutely toxic to them. A single raisin can kill your dog, for example.

 
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37. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 26, 2017, 00:46 Creston
 
BobBob wrote on Aug 25, 2017, 16:58:
Creston wrote on Aug 25, 2017, 09:55:
...

Wow an encyclopedia of advice! Thank you! Hope you don't mind if I pick your brain in the future.

Ask away man.

Here's a picture they showed me of when she was even younger. Grin

She's a real cutie. Just be careful how much you walk her. Pekinese aren't marathon dogs.
 
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36. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 25, 2017, 16:58 BobBob
 
Creston wrote on Aug 25, 2017, 09:55:
...

Wow an encyclopedia of advice! Thank you! Hope you don't mind if I pick your brain in the future.

Here's a picture they showed me of when she was even younger. Grin
 
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35. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 25, 2017, 09:55 Creston
 
BobBob wrote on Aug 24, 2017, 15:27:
Good to know. I hope we can train that out of her. I want to take the adopted dog to a doggy obedience school and for my wife and I to be trained as new pet owners.

Obedience school is always smart. It teaches you a LOT of things that will help you have a more fun relationship with your dog. You want your dog to listen to you just for your own sanity, but it's far better for the dog to be obedient too, because it doesn't always know when it's in jeopardy. My dogs respond to LEAVE IT perfectly, which has helped several times when I spilled something in the kitchen that would have been poisonous to them.

My main concern as a first time dog owner is how should I prepare? Is there an online guide on for "First time dog ownership"? What should I purchase and be prepared to feed her? How do I know when she needs to do her duty outside? The foster person has a dog door, but we don't.

Man, I've had dogs so long that's a really good question. I'm sure there are books you can find, but none that I can recommend, unfortunately. I've literally had dogs my entire life.

Food, I would ask the person from whom you adopt the dog what they give him/her, and just continue with that for a while. It's never a good idea to switch a dog over cold turkey anyway, as their stomachs can get really upset if you do that. If you want to wean them off their old food and get them some new, slowly start mixing in the new food and up the ratio of new vs old every few days.

Type of food is very dependent on the dog. Most dogs do fine with dry foods, but some will only tolerate wet/canned food. Typically I'd say buy them a good brand, but don't go overboard on price. Check the bag for ingredients, and make sure that the first few ingredients are actually what the bags says/pretends they are. You want actual fish/meat/vegetables in there, so it should say Salmon or Beef or Corn, rather than Chicken Product or Chicken Meal. Both Product and Meal indicate that it's literally just ground up remnants (think beaks and feet, etc.) Stay far away from that garbage.

Put your dog on normal, good food first, and if they tolerate it well enough, keep them on that. If it looks like they might be having allergic reactions to something (your vet can help diagnose that), you can switch to sensitive stomach foods. However, those are usually significantly more expensive, so you want to try the cheaper stuff first.

Some (crazy) people advocate giving your dogs different flavors of food so they "don't get bored with their food" but that's honestly not a good thing to do. First off, dogs tend to not handle changes in their diet all that well, so forcing them to keep switching off like that isn't good, and second, all dog food is bland as anything anyway, so it's not as if they'd taste that much difference. It's far better to stick with something they like, and to give them small pieces of doggie treats with different flavors as rewards.


As for the dog having to go out, at 9 months she should be able to hold it reasonably well for 6-8 hours, so just schedule times for her to go out, and she'll quickly adjust to that. Make sure to let her out at the same times each day, though, so she can learn the schedule.

At first, she will most likely do business in your house. One important thing to know is to NEVER do the bullshit "Rub a dog's nose in it!" thing. All that does is tell your dog "Here is where I want you to poop/pee." Instead, do the following:

1) If you catch them in the act, yell loudly. The idea is to scare them (I know that sounds mean, but it works) while they're doing it inside, so they'll quickly learn not to do that.

2) Take them outside, and praise them with a kind tone when they do their business outside. Give them a treat and say something like "good potties outside!" Yes, I know it sounds silly, but it works. If you keep repeating the potties outside command, eventually they'll know that that means doing business outside, and you can get them to respond to that command.

3) If you find they pooped / peed in your house but you did not catch them in the act, DO NOT PUNISH THEM. Dogs have no concept of being punished for something they did in the past, so they will literally have no clue why you're punishing them. Buy a stain / odor remover (Nature's Miracle works very well), and thoroughly scrub the stain (and more importantly: the odor) away so the dog doesn't smell it the next day and thinks that's its place to go.

It can take a while with young puppies to house train them, but at 9 months (and if the current foster parent is doing their job well), it really shouldn't be much of an issue.

If you get good with the Potties Outside command, and the dog is smart enough, you can eventually turn it into a question and if they need to go, they will whuff or wag to indicate they need to go. Both my dogs are very good at letting us know if they need to go outside of their normal times. Note that it's not mandatory that you let them go, though. Again, an adult dog can hold its business quite well, but if it's an easy thing to let them out, it's just as easy to do it to prevent any unfortunate accidents.

If you ever leave your dog in too long and it goes inside the house, don't blame them for it. It was your own fault for not letting it go outside.


The only video I could find is in the opposite extreme. :)

Awww.

So tempting ...

Here's the thing: I've always had dogs, and always had one. This last time, we decided to get two. We didn't plan on it, we were ready to walk out with our boy dog, when we saw a girl dog sitting there, and she looked so sweet, and yet so sad that we were taking her brother, that my heart broke and I adopted her on the spot too.

Taking two dogs was the best decision I ever made. They keep each other company, they play together, they look out for each other, and it's just wonderful. Dogs love being in a pack, and this means they have someone besides you to entertain them, which definitely helps out.

The downside, of course, is that two dogs is easily twice as expensive. You need two of everything, you need twice the amount of food, and you will rack up a ton of vet bills. If you can afford it, do it, but just be aware of the financial consequences.

I was wondering about that. I'm tempted to purchase this backpack. That way on long hikes he/she can hop inside, while I continue walking.

Yeah. Just try it out first before you go on that long hike. You want the dog to become used to it before you count on it for multiple hours. Also, remember that I said about hiking paths and sharp rocks. You really want to try to get him/her used to some doggie booties.
 
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34. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 24, 2017, 15:27 BobBob
 
Creston wrote on Aug 24, 2017, 14:45:
Nah, the girl is just holding up treats. Every dog will go nuts if you do that. It's also a bad thing to do, because you're teaching the dog that jumping up and grabbing food out of your hand is perfectly okay, which is not the kind of behavior you want. (They'll jump up on you to snatch food when you're not expecting it.)

Good to know. I hope we can train that out of her. I want to take the adopted dog to a doggy obedience school and for my wife and I to be trained as new pet owners.

My main concern as a first time dog owner is how should I prepare? Is there an online guide on for "First time dog ownership"? What should I purchase and be prepared to feed her? How do I know when she needs to do her duty outside? The foster person has a dog door, but we don't.

She seems very cute. I wouldn't think she's too high strung, but maybe see if you can find a video where she's not being enticed with treats :)

The only video I could find is in the opposite extreme.

I was told by her foster parent that she believes the dog will mellow out after she's over the puppy phase.

Awwww, he's so cute too. Far more mellow and relaxed, but that makes sense at age 4 versus 9 months. I think both of them would make fine pets (Get them both! ).

So tempting ...

I would be cautious about how much walking you make them do, though, because they're both very small. An hour walk should be okay, but multiple hours of hiking will be too much for them, so take that into account.

I was wondering about that. I'm tempted to purchase this backpack. That way on long hikes he/she can hop inside, while I continue walking.

Hope it helps :)

More than you know!
 
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33. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 24, 2017, 14:45 Creston
 
BobBob wrote on Aug 24, 2017, 09:57:
Yep, we want to get pet insurance and plan to create a bank for the dog's health, food, etc.



On the subject of energy level. Very well stated and all good points to consider. I'll take that strongly into consideration.

Here's a video posted of her.

It seems like in the video the person is agitating the dog, but it could be the personality of the dog too.

Nah, the girl is just holding up treats. Every dog will go nuts if you do that. It's also a bad thing to do, because you're teaching the dog that jumping up and grabbing food out of your hand is perfectly okay, which is not the kind of behavior you want. (They'll jump up on you to snatch food when you're not expecting it.)

She seems very cute. I wouldn't think she's too high strung, but maybe see if you can find a video where she's not being enticed with treats

I was told by her foster parent that she believes the dog will mellow out after she's over the puppy phase.

Yeah, she will. The big question is how long that will take. My two dogs didn't really lose their puppy craziness until they turned six.


Another rescue group wants to introduce us to a similar type of dog. Here's a video of him.

He's wearing the green collar and he's 4 years old.


Awwww, he's so cute too. Far more mellow and relaxed, but that makes sense at age 4 versus 9 months. I think both of them would make fine pets (Get them both! ). I would be cautious about how much walking you make them do, though, because they're both very small. An hour walk should be okay, but multiple hours of hiking will be too much for them, so take that into account.

Hope it helps
 
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32. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 24, 2017, 09:59 BobBob
 
Creston wrote on Aug 24, 2017, 09:48:
BobBob wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 15:32:
You bring up an interesting point. Where I live is minutes from the beach and many walking / hiking trails. We hope to walk the dog morning, noon, and night 30 minutes to an hour each time, and we like to walk/hike for hours on weekends.

Can a little dog handle so much walking or does it depend on the breed? Is the one I showed going to be too small for such adventures, even when fully grown?

I also saw something like this, which might help if the dog gets tired?

How little is little? I didn't see a link to the doggie anywhere? If you're talking about a tiny little dog (Think chihuahua size), an hour's worth of walking at slow human pace is probably okay, but several hours would be too much. Also, be careful on hiking trails, as there can be sharp rocks. You might want to invest in some doggie booties at that point.

A carrying backpack can definitely help when a tiny dog gets tired, as by and large they don't mind being picked up/carried. Typically though, the larger the dog gets, the less it likes being picked up/carried. (Unless it's just lazy )


I just made another post with a couple of videos of the dogs. Are you able to see them? They should give an idea of what we are considering. Opinions are appreciated.

This comment was edited on Aug 24, 2017, 11:32.
 
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31. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 24, 2017, 09:57 BobBob
 
Creston wrote on Aug 24, 2017, 09:35:
BobBob wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 10:45:
I don't trust other discussion sites - literally - I participate in the discussions here but avoid other places for the most part I simply lurk.

So I'm thinking of adopting a rescue dog and she's 9 months. Does that mean she's a puppy? What am I looking at when adopting a 9 month year old dog? I'm just wanting to gather as much knowledge, ideas, and opinions as I can.

I've never owned a dog - though I've had numerous other kinds of pets. I had a relative who had Boxers, which are pretty high energy dogs, I used to play with them a lot and they were fun.

9 months old is still a puppy, but she'll have done most of her growing by that point (she may gain another 5-10% or so) and her behavior should be reasonably established. Ideally she'll be potty trained and at least be over her initial instinct to chew on literally everything.

Be careful about adopting a breed that is high energy. We got a Border collie (which is about the highest energy breed you can get), and he literally needs to be kept entertained for most hours of the day or he gets bored. We love it, but if you want a dog that you only need to pay attention to for an hour a day or so, go with a low energy breed.

All that said, a dog is a wonderful companion, and I can never encourage people enough to adopt them. Just please don't do it lightly. If you adopt a dog, make sure you are willing and capable (especially financially) of taking care of it. Your dog WILL get sick. it WILL get injured. It WILL require significant cash in vet bills from time to time. If you are unable or unwilling to invest the time and energy, please do not adopt one.

I have a colleague whose <1 year old doggie has had a limp for a few weeks, and the fucker is talking about putting it down, because the vet bills to fix it would be too high...

Yep, we want to get pet insurance and plan to create a bank for the dog's health, food, etc.

On the subject of energy level. Very well stated and all good points to consider. I'll take that strongly into consideration.

Here's a video posted of her.

It seems like in the video the person is agitating the dog, but it could be the personality of the dog too.

I was told by her foster parent that she believes the dog will mellow out after she's over the puppy phase.

Another rescue group wants to introduce us to a similar type of dog. Here's a video of him.

He's wearing the green collar and he's 4 years old.

All opinions and advice are welcome.

 
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30. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 24, 2017, 09:54 Creston
 
BobBob wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 16:42:
Is it a good idea to put your full name, address, and phone # on the dog's tag?

Yes, absolutely. A better idea might be to chip your dog. It costs like $15, and that way it's not visible to everyone who looks at the tag. But I've had several dogs that showed up on my doorstep where I was able to bring them back home because they were tagged.
 
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29. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 24, 2017, 09:48 Creston
 
BobBob wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 15:32:
You bring up an interesting point. Where I live is minutes from the beach and many walking / hiking trails. We hope to walk the dog morning, noon, and night 30 minutes to an hour each time, and we like to walk/hike for hours on weekends.

Can a little dog handle so much walking or does it depend on the breed? Is the one I showed going to be too small for such adventures, even when fully grown?

I also saw something like this, which might help if the dog gets tired?

How little is little? I didn't see a link to the doggie anywhere? If you're talking about a tiny little dog (Think chihuahua size), an hour's worth of walking at slow human pace is probably okay, but several hours would be too much. Also, be careful on hiking trails, as there can be sharp rocks. You might want to invest in some doggie booties at that point.

A carrying backpack can definitely help when a tiny dog gets tired, as by and large they don't mind being picked up/carried. Typically though, the larger the dog gets, the less it likes being picked up/carried. (Unless it's just lazy )

 
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28. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 24, 2017, 09:35 Creston
 
BobBob wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 10:45:
I don't trust other discussion sites - literally - I participate in the discussions here but avoid other places for the most part I simply lurk.

So I'm thinking of adopting a rescue dog and she's 9 months. Does that mean she's a puppy? What am I looking at when adopting a 9 month year old dog? I'm just wanting to gather as much knowledge, ideas, and opinions as I can.

I've never owned a dog - though I've had numerous other kinds of pets. I had a relative who had Boxers, which are pretty high energy dogs, I used to play with them a lot and they were fun.

9 months old is still a puppy, but she'll have done most of her growing by that point (she may gain another 5-10% or so) and her behavior should be reasonably established. Ideally she'll be potty trained and at least be over her initial instinct to chew on literally everything.

Be careful about adopting a breed that is high energy. We got a Border collie (which is about the highest energy breed you can get), and he literally needs to be kept entertained for most hours of the day or he gets bored. We love it, but if you want a dog that you only need to pay attention to for an hour a day or so, go with a low energy breed.

All that said, a dog is a wonderful companion, and I can never encourage people enough to adopt them. Just please don't do it lightly. If you adopt a dog, make sure you are willing and capable (especially financially) of taking care of it. Your dog WILL get sick. it WILL get injured. It WILL require significant cash in vet bills from time to time. If you are unable or unwilling to invest the time and energy, please do not adopt one.

I have a colleague whose <1 year old doggie has had a limp for a few weeks, and the fucker is talking about putting it down, because the vet bills to fix it would be too high...
 
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27. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 24, 2017, 09:21 Creston
 
100 greatest comedies. I would have been fine with anything except for the Academy's list, which for the longest time had effing TOOTSIE as the funniest movie of all time.

Instead, now it's "Some like it hot."

Apparently, men dressing up as women automatically puts a movie in the top 50 of funniest movies of all time.
 
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26. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 23, 2017, 20:39 RedEye9
 

Thanks Rhialto
Smarter Every Day rocks and that vidja was not any different.
 
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https://www.newyorker.com/humor/borowitz-report
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25. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 23, 2017, 20:08 RedEye9
 
BobBob wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 16:42:
Is it a good idea to put your full name, address, and phone # on the dog's tag?
I had a dog follow me home one New Years eve, fireworks had scared it and it jumped the fence.

Tags had the dogs name and a phone number. One of the most beautiful girls in the world came and picked up her dog (god I miss that dog ). (a new college kid in town and was unaware of the propensity for fireworks and fence height)

TLDR Ask the local pet store and your vet. I think a phone number is enough.
 
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https://www.newyorker.com/humor/borowitz-report
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24. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 23, 2017, 20:01 RedEye9
 
Beamer wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 19:42:
jdreyer wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 19:20:
That hermit story is crazy, but I remember reading about a similar case a few years ago also in Maine. Must be something in the water. I wonder how that guy survived all the black flies living outdoor like that.

The article is 4 years old, hence your Deja vu, haha
They made a movie about it. Buster's Mal Heart http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5173032/

/sarc
 
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23. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 23, 2017, 19:42 Beamer
 
jdreyer wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 19:20:
That hermit story is crazy, but I remember reading about a similar case a few years ago also in Maine. Must be something in the water. I wonder how that guy survived all the black flies living outdoor like that.

The article is 4 years old, hence your Deja vu, haha
 
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http://www.deathwishinc.com
http://www.hydrahead.com
http://www.painkillerrecords.com
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22. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 23, 2017, 19:20 jdreyer
 
That hermit story is crazy, but I remember reading about a similar case a few years ago also in Maine. Must be something in the water. I wonder how that guy survived all the black flies living outdoor like that.  
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Stay a while, and listen.
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21. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 23, 2017, 18:09 afka Rossini
 
PHJF wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 12:34:
Here's my boy we adopted from a foster back in May this year. He was about a year at the time.

Who's a good dog?
 
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20. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 23, 2017, 18:08 afka Rossini
 
jdreyer wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 16:10:
RedEye9 wrote on Aug 23, 2017, 15:10:
State Dept. science envoy resigns with letter that spells out 'Impeach'

Keith Olbermann Predicts How It Will All End For Trump
Spoiler: oranges resignation will come about at the end of Mueller’s investigation.


If you could reason with a tRUMP supporter there wouldn't be any tRUMP supporters.
He'll never resign. That would involve admitting he was wrong which he's incapable of admitting.

If he ever does resign, I'd bet he would cite 'health reasons' whether true or not. I hope he doesn't at least until next years mid-term elections. Otherwise that would leave Pence in charge with Republican majorities in both houses.
 
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