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Morning Safety Dance

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14 Replies. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
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14. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 19, 2017, 15:14 Creston
 
HorrorScope wrote on May 19, 2017, 13:20:
Yeah Burrito sounds reasonable you test a sample of the overall. But Creston's 2005, I didn't know companies do mass auto-bios updates without testing and if with a passing grade would do a slow roll out. That is living life. Company wise, I'd only consider a bios upgrade if it was a security reason or something specific to a system(s) and an issue with it that it would specifically fix.

You'd be amazed how many companies, even today, test 'in production.' (Ie, just release everything and "we'll deal with any issues that occur." )

Hey, it saves like a few thousand bucks on test PCs!
 
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13. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 19, 2017, 13:20 HorrorScope
 
Yeah Burrito sounds reasonable you test a sample of the overall. But Creston's 2005, I didn't know companies do mass auto-bios updates without testing and if with a passing grade would do a slow roll out. That is living life. Company wise, I'd only consider a bios upgrade if it was a security reason or something specific to a system(s) and an issue with it that it would specifically fix.  
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12. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 19, 2017, 09:38 RedEye9
 
Mr. Tact wrote on May 19, 2017, 09:20:
RedEye9 wrote on May 19, 2017, 07:31:
My HP laptop does the same thing on popping up with new software bios updates and recommends that they be installed.
And do you install them?

Corporate environment is a different story. I can do a CYA via email to the boss on any update I don't really think is needed, plus I can have a test pool of machines prior to updating large numbers of them.

However, for personal equipment, as far as BIOS updates go, I'll stick with my only "to fix a known problem you were experiencing and with a patch known to work".
If it's for adding support for new cpu's I won't install it because my lappy ain't getting a new cpu.
But if it's for rando stability fixes, cooling fan curve adjustment etc, then yes I install them.
I even had to roll back one that disappeared from the hp site when 10 came out. The older bios helped with 10 but 10 ain't meant for my laptop, and that's another story.

As for my gaming desktop since the chipset/mb/cpu were newly released it definitely went through several bios updates.
 
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11. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 19, 2017, 09:20 Mr. Tact
 
RedEye9 wrote on May 19, 2017, 07:31:
My HP laptop does the same thing on popping up with new software bios updates and recommends that they be installed.
And do you install them?

Corporate environment is a different story. I can do a CYA via email to the boss on any update I don't really think is needed, plus I can have a test pool of machines prior to updating large numbers of them.

However, for personal equipment, as far as BIOS updates go, I'll stick with my only "to fix a known problem you were experiencing and with a patch known to work".
 
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10. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 19, 2017, 07:31 RedEye9
 
Mr. Tact wrote on May 18, 2017, 21:30:
Okay, tell me what am I missing here?

I've owned at least one PC since 1989, probably a solid dozen in all. I think I've done one BIOS update in all that time to correct a specific problem. Why would you ever do this except to fix a known problem you were experiencing and with a patch known to work?
Because 99% of the time firmware updates don't cause issues.
Same goes for 98% of windows updates.
If I'm not mistaken, Dell bios updates fall in the "recommended" category, it's part of doing maintenance in a big organization.
Do you want to be the one who tells your boss that a recommended update you did not install could have fixed a problem on 20 of 1000 laptops you maintain.
My Asrock mb even talks to the internet and says "THERE IS S NEW BIOS AVAILABLE" or at least it's windows software does.
And the release notes for these updates is laughable at best so when the only thing it says is "Stability Fixes", it's getting installed.

My HP laptop does the same thing on popping up with new software bios updates and recommends that they be installed.

That being said it never hurts to let the early adopters beta test the new bios, windows updates and "free" operating systems for you. Sure saves a lot of hassle in the long run.
 
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9. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 18, 2017, 21:30 Mr. Tact
 
Okay, tell me what am I missing here?

I've owned at least one PC since 1989, probably a solid dozen in all. I think I've done one BIOS update in all that time to correct a specific problem. Why would you ever do this except to fix a known problem you were experiencing and with a patch known to work?
 
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8. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 18, 2017, 20:21 Phasenoise
 
I feel this is a good time for a "You had ONE job..." meme picture.  
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7. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 18, 2017, 16:04 Wallshadows
 
It's kind of stupid how Gigabyte and Biostar are the only two consumer-grade companies which use a dual BIOS setup in mainstream boards. I almost got a B350 Gaming 3 because of this but figured since I never bricked a board before with the BIOS I could save being soaked $30 because of OMG ARR GEE BEEE and Biostar is, well, Biostar.  
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6. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 18, 2017, 12:43 El Pit
 
An ASUS board I had ages ago was one of the first featuring live updates via the internet. And ASUS released one BIOS update that killed the board. They took it down just minutes after it had killed my board (and that of other people, too). A friend of mine re-flashed the BIOS chip at work which saved me. I have never used a live update for a mainboard again. Lesson learned!  
They're waiting for you, Gabe, in the test chamber!
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5. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 18, 2017, 11:38 Creston
 
Burrito of Peace wrote on May 18, 2017, 09:50:
It's not just the Inspiron model that is having a problem. At work, we have a couple thousand Optiplex 7040s deployed on a campus I supervise. Tuesday, we picked 100 as a test lot. 48% of them experienced a no post/no boot scenario after updating to the latest BIOS to fix the AMT vulnerability.

A little more than three hours on the phone with Dell, an actual engineer finally got in contact with me and we had to short a particular pin on a jumper (not the "Magic Blue Jumper" that is usually reserved for clearing BIOS passwords and CMOS values) to get in to recovery mode so we could then hand load those 48 machines with USB sticks.

Normally, we use SCCM to deploy the BIOS update package through Windows and there's not a problem. The mouth breathing phone monkeys kept trying to point the finger at SCCM as the problem when the engineer I spoke to just laughed wryly. Dell's support is terrible, even at Premier and Gold levels. These BIOS updates scream "rush job" with little to no eval and QA being done.

Yeah, I've had multiple BIOS fuck-ups from Dell. The most amazing one was admittedly a long time ago (2005), when their BIOS update literally bricked every desktop in my company. All of them would just boot to a black screen, and then the fan would go absolutely berserk. It was quite amazing listening to 250 jet motors on a single floor.

Dell support just went "duuurrrr wedinthaveanyproblemshere duuurrrr"

At my wits end, I decided to literally short the CMOS, and lo and behold, it cleared the error. We wound up shorting about 700 CMOSes in the next few days. When we informed Dell of this "fix", they just went "Wowthatsweird duuurrrrrr"


Dell's initial reaction was to tell customers they needed to buy new motherboards.

That's quality customer service there. Just quality.
 
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4. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 18, 2017, 11:13 RedEye9
 
Burrito of Peace wrote on May 18, 2017, 09:50:
It's not just the Inspiron model that is having a problem. At work, we have a couple thousand Optiplex 7040s deployed on a campus I supervise. Tuesday, we picked 100 as a test lot. 48% of them experienced a no post/no boot scenario after updating to the latest BIOS to fix the AMT vulnerability.

A little more than three hours on the phone with Dell, an actual engineer finally got in contact with me and we had to short a particular pin on a jumper (not the "Magic Blue Jumper" that is usually reserved for clearing BIOS passwords and CMOS values) to get in to recovery mode so we could then hand load those 48 machines with USB sticks.

Normally, we use SCCM to deploy the BIOS update package through Windows and there's not a problem. The mouth breathing phone monkeys kept trying to point the finger at SCCM as the problem when the engineer I spoke to just laughed wryly. Dell's support is terrible, even at Premier and Gold levels. These BIOS updates scream "rush job" with little to no eval and QA being done.
Wow, Dell had better not "United Airlines" this.
 
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3. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 18, 2017, 09:50 Burrito of Peace
 
It's not just the Inspiron model that is having a problem. At work, we have a couple thousand Optiplex 7040s deployed on a campus I supervise. Tuesday, we picked 100 as a test lot. 48% of them experienced a no post/no boot scenario after updating to the latest BIOS to fix the AMT vulnerability.

A little more than three hours on the phone with Dell, an actual engineer finally got in contact with me and we had to short a particular pin on a jumper (not the "Magic Blue Jumper" that is usually reserved for clearing BIOS passwords and CMOS values) to get in to recovery mode so we could then hand load those 48 machines with USB sticks.

Normally, we use SCCM to deploy the BIOS update package through Windows and there's not a problem. The mouth breathing phone monkeys kept trying to point the finger at SCCM as the problem when the engineer I spoke to just laughed wryly. Dell's support is terrible, even at Premier and Gold levels. These BIOS updates scream "rush job" with little to no eval and QA being done.
 
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2. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 18, 2017, 09:27 Dev
 
RedEye9 wrote on May 18, 2017, 09:11:
My sphincter tightens every time I update a bios even though I have only ever cooked one motherboard.
This is why my last mobo I got, I made sure it had a backup bios. If the main one borks, I have a backup. Also I try to do them while I'm on UPS, if a power outage happens while updating that will bork it too.

Modern mobos typically have an emergency recovery mode as well. So there's a few different failsafes.

 
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1. Re: Morning Safety Dance May 18, 2017, 09:11 RedEye9
 

My sphincter tightens every time I update a bios even though I have only ever cooked one motherboard.
 
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