Xbox One Controller Windows Issues

Recent developments are making it harder to use Xbox One controllers on Windows PCs, according to Ars Technica. In spite of Windows Bluetooth support, new Bluetooth-powered controllers for the Xbox One S are part of the problem. This support thread has details, and Ars says, "Some games no longer recognize when Xbox One controllers are connected via Bluetooth or through the official Xbox One wireless adapter. Other games, as well as Steam's Big Picture mode, think a single Xbox One controller is two controllers simultaneously." At the same time, the recent Windows 10 anniversary update seems to have broken homebrew workarounds for third-party controllers. Finally, they also note only a single Bluetooth controller can connect to a PC at once, and this must be running Windows 10. Here's a summary of the mess that leads them to suggest gamers uninstall the Win10 anniversary update:
Another issue is less likely to receive an update: the new Xbox One controllers' Bluetooth support is severely limited. As in, only one pad can be connected via Bluetooth at once.

Microsoft isn't advertising this limitation, but an official Xbox Support page confirms it: you can only connect one Bluetooth pad to a Windows 10 PC at a time, and those Bluetooth pads require running on Windows 10 with the Anniversary update. If you want to use more wireless Xbox One pads on a single PC, you'll need to purchase the official Xbox One wireless adapter. Otherwise, don't rush out and buy a bunch of updated Xbox One pads expecting them to sync up to any laptop for the sake of wild, on-the-go multiplayer sessions of Push Me Pull You or Towerfall: Ascension.

The situation gets worse. Your sole Bluetooth controller won't even function in Windows 10's Anniversary update until you update the controller's firmware, which users aren't told when they connect the pads. Instead, users must manually find and install the Xbox Accessories app from the Windows Store. Boot that with the Xbox One pad connected via Bluetooth, and you'll then get the prompt to update the pad's firmware. The new Xbox One controller does not include instructions to this effect, possibly because Xbox One consoles automate this process in a way that Windows 10 PCs do not.

Until Microsoft announces an update to these controller-based woes, the gaming geeks at Ars recommend that you avoid the Anniversary update. If you've already updated and want to return to the "it just works" days of XInput support on wireless controllers, toggle to the "revert to your previous install of Windows" option, which isn't hard to find in the options menus.
View : : :
57 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 1.
Newer [  1  2  3  ] Older
57.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 10, 2016, 17:01
Beamer
 
57.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 10, 2016, 17:01
Aug 10, 2016, 17:01
 Beamer
 
Actually, Combofix does support Windows 8. It does not support 8.1.
56.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 10, 2016, 16:34
56.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 10, 2016, 16:34
Aug 10, 2016, 16:34
 
HorrorScope wrote on Aug 10, 2016, 12:22:
Does ComboFix work with Win10? I'll check and run it if so. I get your point, well noted and if these weren't mostly entertainment systems yes I would run a tighter ship. But I do measure the systems crticalness and the results I do see and adjust over time. I'm not saying I'm right, I'm not telling others not to do whatever makes them sleep at night and all that.

I will say is you are very confident in what you mention and seem to shit on most AV systems in general it seems, but I have to think then almost all people using AV's are running AV's that you possibly deem as no good, so look at all of that false hope. I want real hope, if it is there for window dressing, I really have no need for it. If it can really do the job, then I wants.

As I said before, Combofix does not support Win8 and higher. Here you are stuck with booting from something like Hiren BootCD in its own mini-Windows7 (if it works), and then hoping it recognizes your Win10 partitions and network card so you can update one of the scanners on it (like MBAM), and then scan your system "from the outside". That should negate a part of the rootkit stealthing efforts, however cumbersome and inconvenient it is.

_______

AVs are not "no good". I never said that. They are a limited part of the overall solution. Using Windows Defender is almost like having no antivirus at all, so it is BETTER to have a decent one with realtime filesystem protection and web traffic monitoring enabled.

There's actually one promising AV called I think Webroot(?), which actually tracks changes made by unknown executables, and reverses them if they're proven to be harmful.

That's some real innovation. I just don't know whether it can track ALL the changes they make, or whether viruses can work around that too.

55.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 10, 2016, 12:22
55.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 10, 2016, 12:22
Aug 10, 2016, 12:22
 
shiho wrote on Aug 9, 2016, 17:57:
HorrorScope wrote on Aug 9, 2016, 16:11:
What if I scan the system periodically and it comes up clean? I don't run real time, but I do scan every so often, haven't found anything in years.

What I've been trying to get through to people for YEARS, and which doesn't seem to sink in, is that post-factum "scanning" doesn't do shit anymore.

Either the attack is stopped before it hits the vulnerable software, via a TCP/IP scanner, or it gets stopped during the execution of the injected or just user- or program- ran code.

If it doesn't, the virus becomes a rootkit. From that point on, it is undetectable by conventional antivirus solutions, which lag 10 years behind industry needs in that department.

They mask themselves using filesystem tricks, append to system files, replace system files, etc. Some detect when infected files are being scanned, and un-infect them, then re-infect them. A lot of those tricks were used in the DOS era, and later forgotten.

ComboFix has been the one program that actually "roots" them out. It is basically an automated hacker toolkit designed to destroy harmful hacker toolkits.

If you run Win7 or XP, I suggest you have System Restore enabled, and then run it.

Windows Defender is the worst of the worst.

Does ComboFix work with Win10? I'll check and run it if so. I get your point, well noted and if these weren't mostly entertainment systems yes I would run a tighter ship. But I do measure the systems crticalness and the results I do see and adjust over time. I'm not saying I'm right, I'm not telling others not to do whatever makes them sleep at night and all that.

I will say is you are very confident in what you mention and seem to shit on most AV systems in general it seems, but I have to think then almost all people using AV's are running AV's that you possibly deem as no good, so look at all of that false hope. I want real hope, if it is there for window dressing, I really have no need for it. If it can really do the job, then I wants.
Avatar 17232
54.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 9, 2016, 17:57
54.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 9, 2016, 17:57
Aug 9, 2016, 17:57
 
HorrorScope wrote on Aug 9, 2016, 16:11:
What if I scan the system periodically and it comes up clean? I don't run real time, but I do scan every so often, haven't found anything in years.

What I've been trying to get through to people for YEARS, and which doesn't seem to sink in, is that post-factum "scanning" doesn't do shit anymore.

Either the attack is stopped before it hits the vulnerable software, via a TCP/IP scanner, or it gets stopped during the execution of the injected or just user- or program- ran code.

If it doesn't, the virus becomes a rootkit. From that point on, it is undetectable by conventional antivirus solutions, which lag 10 years behind industry needs in that department.

They mask themselves using filesystem tricks, append to system files, replace system files, etc. Some detect when infected files are being scanned, and un-infect them, then re-infect them. A lot of those tricks were used in the DOS era, and later forgotten.

ComboFix has been the one program that actually "roots" them out. It is basically an automated hacker toolkit designed to destroy harmful hacker toolkits.

If you run Win7 or XP, I suggest you have System Restore enabled, and then run it.

Windows Defender is the worst of the worst.
53.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 9, 2016, 16:11
53.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 9, 2016, 16:11
Aug 9, 2016, 16:11
 
Verno wrote on Aug 9, 2016, 12:59:
HorrorScope wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 17:46:
Exactly. A protected browser, firewall etc does the trick. Since I run with image backups, I can also be loose, I'm 30 minutes away from being clean.

You don't know that your initial image is clean is the problem. If you run no protection, you don't know any better. Once you get rooted you're done and without any initial protection you won't know any better. Any backup you make after initial installation could be compromised. User practices are important but you can still get exploited through no fault of your own and that's what you fail to account for. There are many exploits that will hit you regardless of how up to date Chrome is or what firewall you're using. You're just counting on luck more than anything else.

While I agree that many have turned their sites on commercial targets which are lucrative, there is still a massive amount of user level malware out there too.

What if I scan the system periodically and it comes up clean? I don't run real time, but I do scan every so often, haven't found anything in years.
Avatar 17232
52.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 9, 2016, 12:59
Verno
 
52.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 9, 2016, 12:59
Aug 9, 2016, 12:59
 Verno
 
HorrorScope wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 17:46:
Exactly. A protected browser, firewall etc does the trick. Since I run with image backups, I can also be loose, I'm 30 minutes away from being clean.

You don't know that your initial image is clean is the problem. If you run no protection, you don't know any better. Once you get rooted you're done and without any initial protection you won't know any better. Any backup you make after initial installation could be compromised. User practices are important but you can still get exploited through no fault of your own and that's what you fail to account for. There are many exploits that will hit you regardless of how up to date Chrome is or what firewall you're using. You're just counting on luck more than anything else.

While I agree that many have turned their sites on commercial targets which are lucrative, there is still a massive amount of user level malware out there too.
Playing: Risk of Rain 2, Jedi Fallen Order, Last of Us II
Watching: Tenet, Peninsula, The Pale Door
Avatar 51617
51.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 9, 2016, 12:53
Verno
 
51.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 9, 2016, 12:53
Aug 9, 2016, 12:53
 Verno
 
shiho wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 17:07:
As for the router exploits, they're usually about gaining unauthorized access to router itself, which is a completely different story. This could happen to anyone dumb enough to use factory firmware, regardless of whether they patch their Windows or not.

Again the point was that sitting behind a router is not really protection. Also the majority of consumer routers are not running custom firmware nor is custom firmware necessarily much better in that regard.

With Win10's neverending stream of barely vetted patches, this is only going to get worse.

That's certainly one opinion but it's not the only one and it ignores the multitude of problems large service packs used to introduce as no amount of internal testing is a substitute for millions of your customers. For better or for worse accelerated patching is industry standard now anyway so you're going to have to get used to it.

I'm not sure you understand what I mean by intrusion detection. Those same vulnerabilities that Microsoft, Firefox and Chrome close in their updates, are often closed faster with Symantec Intrusion Prevention. They scan for the exploit patterns which are meant to create buffer overruns in your browser or kernel or whatever, and stop them before they reach the target.

I don't use that product and can't verify what you say to be true or not. I don't really see how its a substitute for actually patching the underlying products or operating system itself. The assumption that it will always be faster seems flawed to me. I'd also note the same AV vendors have introduced their own sets of problematic updates which have rendered systems unbootable and whose products themselves have been the target of malware numerous times. You want to fault Microsoft for these things on one hand but give other companies a pass, it seems like a contradiction to me.

Source?

I didn't see a source on your initial claim either. Any systems administrator ever. Put up an unpatched XP VM and let me know how that goes. I'm not wasting time sourcing something that is common knowledge, look up literally any famous automated worm from that era. Sitting behind a router didn't help anyone then which was the point. The small degree of protection you get from having a bunch of closed ports did not stop these things from proliferating.

I guess I should throw out my Nvidia card then, too, because there's tangible evidence of them destroying people's hardware with bad drivers.

Or, you know, I can be smart about it, and buffer the driver updates.

Apples and oranges which also fails to address the point. A video card update does not have the same urgency as a security update for what should be obvious reasons. A few problematic updates does not negate patching and I'm not sure waiting an arbitrary period of time is a better practice either, quite often issues are found very early before real mass deployment anyway. Sometimes they aren't, there are no perfect practices when it comes to software design.

I believe what you describe is a symptom of BPD, or borderline personality disorder. It's an unenviable mental state, as we otherwise operate within the real world of grays and compromises, rather than black-and-white absolutes.

Seems like a veiled insult which was uncalled for and off point. I made my compromises already and decided that I could use Windows 10. I'm just pointing out the inconsistency in logic people are using. Not trusting Microsoft to deliver updates to Windows 10 but trusting them with Windows 7 for example, its the same company (and often the same teams) behind the product. You talked about mental state but I'm not the one throwing around words like hate. The companies responsible are going to feel absence of money/users a lot more than they're going to feel strong words on an internet forum.
Playing: Risk of Rain 2, Jedi Fallen Order, Last of Us II
Watching: Tenet, Peninsula, The Pale Door
Avatar 51617
50.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 9, 2016, 11:08
50.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 9, 2016, 11:08
Aug 9, 2016, 11:08
 
shiho wrote on Aug 9, 2016, 02:11:
@HorroScope: That's the other extreme. Running without a decent antivirus (and MS shit doesn't count as such), is reckless.

It IS possible to get infected, like for instance with the recent hack of a download site which embedded a virus into the installers.

Or, through a hole of some shitty browser addon like Flash.

Or, say, you bought a Ubisoft game, realized what a hassle their "service" is, and decided to pirate it instead, because pirates get a better version of it, with the service stripped out. You run a questinonable crack made by some kid with morals looser than his mom's vagina.

Worse yet, in the past 10 years the nature of Windows viruses changed drastically. Practically every virus these days is a rootkit.

Once it is executed, you will have no traces of its activity in the system, such as CPU time expenditure. Maybe excessive bandwidth spending - MAYBE NOT.

Conventional antiviruses are as great at dealing with rootkits as an ED-209 was at going down the stairs.

There are specialized utilities like Combofix, which do a much better job. Unfortunately Combofix doesn't support Win8 and up.

I would suggest you run ComboFix (from BleepingComputer.com) for shits and giggles. Let it create the System Restore point first, of course. See if it digs something up in its deletion report, because it very well might.

You say it is reckless but I've been doing this for ages. You then go on to mention how conventional AV's can suck, well 99% of the people must have false hopes. I am totally backed up, so really anything I'd be doing isn't that reckless, unless you feel my system is unsecure to the point someone will data mine it for user/password data. But major companies doing all the right things so far have been hacked infinitely more than I have personally.

I get those that run AV's religiously that how would they know how things are without using one these days? I still reference around 2004's was the height of virus fever for me and my family, at one point I felt you really did have to have something running. I do contribute that a good browser with add-on's does help, or at least did years ago when I first started using them. Perhaps I'm in the same type of boat some are with AV, maybe things like no-scrip etc aren't doing much for me anymore. However, my hunch believes good browsing habits can make a world of difference.

I can only state I'm being honest with everyone in how I do my thing. I'm the guy that has seen a system run for over a year without a reboot and I'm talking about my main gaming system. I had over a decade in a system that started with Win95 to 98, ME etc, with tons of HW updates and survived until I went with a Win7 64 bit O/S. And never had all these slow down issues people talk about with bloated registries from upgrading O/S's vs clean install. I have a cousin that clean installs when any little thing happens, I google and take the time to fix it, so I figure he's a type of user out there, meaning you have two choices with problems, fix it and keep what you have or clean load when anything odd continues to happen, if you don't backup.

I do know Win10 is using Defender again and is back on at this time, hasn't found a thing. Will review that process today come to think of it to see what is up.

Another bonus having a SSD since they are small, as we use them for putting our O/S on and perhaps a couple big games we play at the moment. It keeps the O/S drive small and under control. Making clone backups easier to find a place to backup 250 Gigs of space on a HDD vs needing another large HD to back up a large O/S hard drive.

I will say I've always been pretty lucky working with PC's, it sorta became my thing. Knocks on wood.

This comment was edited on Aug 9, 2016, 11:19.
Avatar 17232
49.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 9, 2016, 02:11
49.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 9, 2016, 02:11
Aug 9, 2016, 02:11
 
@HorroScope: That's the other extreme. Running without a decent antivirus (and MS shit doesn't count as such), is reckless.

It IS possible to get infected, like for instance with the recent hack of a download site which embedded a virus into the installers.

Or, through a hole of some shitty browser addon like Flash.

Or, say, you bought a Ubisoft game, realized what a hassle their "service" is, and decided to pirate it instead, because pirates get a better version of it, with the service stripped out. You run a questinonable crack made by some kid with morals looser than his mom's vagina.

Worse yet, in the past 10 years the nature of Windows viruses changed drastically. Practically every virus these days is a rootkit.

Once it is executed, you will have no traces of its activity in the system, such as CPU time expenditure. Maybe excessive bandwidth spending - MAYBE NOT.

Conventional antiviruses are as great at dealing with rootkits as an ED-209 was at going down the stairs.

There are specialized utilities like Combofix, which do a much better job. Unfortunately Combofix doesn't support Win8 and up.

I would suggest you run ComboFix (from BleepingComputer.com) for shits and giggles. Let it create the System Restore point first, of course. See if it digs something up in its deletion report, because it very well might.
48.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 8, 2016, 17:46
48.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 8, 2016, 17:46
Aug 8, 2016, 17:46
 
shiho wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 15:52:
RedEye9 wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 14:53:
I am glad people recognize my superiority, it makes me feel good.
But it is ok to question me no matter what some might think.

If you turn off automatic updating, and you don't remember to be vigilant, your PC will rarely if ever get patched. You'll be one of a minority with wide-open security holes.

Most of which can't even reach your average PC behind a router. And are faster stopped by an antivirus with network intrusion detection than laggy Microsoft patches. And have new security holes or plain instability in them, which could as well be more severe than the old ones, given Microsoft's lackluster QA.


Exactly. A protected browser, firewall etc does the trick. Since I run with image backups, I can also be loose, I'm 30 minutes away from being clean.

I don't have real-time protection on, I use Firfox with a few protective addons, systems have been clean for not a couple years now, but many years, I do clean up some adware say once a month. I'd probably go as far to say if I ran with real-time protection it would be catching false positives of apps I do run and ok.

If MS thinks it has to give me a monthly release of "critical security updates" that tells me there is really no security at all if we have to get down to the minute nitty gritty. It's just a ship full of holes, but at the same time it isn't nowhere near as dangerous as some think if you play it a little smart, I also don't feel like a target.

My main Win 7 system was probably a good year out of updates, perhaps some of my off systems going on a couple years. These updates aren't all that. Perhaps I have to manually update a .net dependency if an app needs it, GPU driver etc.

We all have to do what we do, but I can attest you can have a clean system running much looser than what is considered safe, with a good browser and habits. Keep a system running for months, being smart with sleep. Win7 was a breakthrough and 10 so far is keeping up with the same, simply solid reliable performance.

Probably been 3-5 years since I've seen a hint of a virus, probably been 15 years since I've seen someone hack into my system. My systems aren't all that exciting for someone to want into.

Where I do get hacked? On commercial sites that get hacked and get my login credentials, that is really the place where I've been vulnerable and have seen it, haven't been bit badly yet there though.

This comment was edited on Aug 8, 2016, 17:57.
Avatar 17232
47.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 8, 2016, 17:07
47.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 8, 2016, 17:07
Aug 8, 2016, 17:07
 
Verno wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 16:16:
NAT is not security and given the sheer number of security issues with most consumer routers I wouldn't rely on them either.

What a strange statement. A PC with an exploitable firewall is going to be ripe for automated attacks, as opposed to one which is also behind a router. A number of which also have stateful packet inspection.

As for the router exploits, they're usually about gaining unauthorized access to router itself, which is a completely different story. This could happen to anyone dumb enough to use factory firmware, regardless of whether they patch their Windows or not.

Microsoft security patches are very fast these days by the way.

Enjoy being the early adopter then.

With Win10's neverending stream of barely vetted patches, this is only going to get worse.

I don't really know of any consumer software that does decent intrusion detection (lol at anyone who even suggest something like ZoneAlarm), pfSense or DIY is the only realistic option there.

I'm not sure you understand what I mean by intrusion detection. Those same vulnerabilities that Microsoft, Firefox and Chrome close in their updates, are often closed faster with Symantec Intrusion Prevention. They scan for the exploit patterns which are meant to create buffer overruns in your browser or kernel or whatever, and stop them before they reach the target.

Kaspersky probably has something like that, too.

If you're going to use an old operating system like Windows 7 then you should definitely have Windows Update on, just pick the updates you want at least.

That's what I do, with a generous delay, to let the early adopters take the brunt of it.

I remember when unpatched XP machines could be infected in minutes due to all of the port scanning and automated blasting of various exploits, NAT didn't save anyone then either.

Source?

Cluster updates are not at all preferable to constant updates as anyone who has been around before WSUS can attest to. Large updates tend to break a lot of things and while the new update processes have their own issues, I find them fairly minor by comparison.

On the flipside, it allows one to wait until Microsoft reissues the ones which cause system instability.

And also, wait for tech community to figure out when they're retconning Win10 "telemetry" into previous OSes.

If you trust Microsoft to build the operating system you use every day then I don't see how you fail to trust them to deliver updates for it. If I really didn't trust Microsoft I simply would not use their products.

I guess I should throw out my Nvidia card then, too, because there's tangible evidence of them destroying people's hardware with bad drivers.

Or, you know, I can be smart about it, and buffer the driver updates.

There's this odd disconnect where people seemingly hate Windows or Microsoft while they continually use the product happily every day.

I hate Windows 10, and I went through quite some lengths to replace it on my new laptop, so I don't actually use THAT product.

Microsoft has plenty of shitty policies and by all means criticize them for it but if people really distrust or dislike the company that much then speak with your wallet and use something else. Actions speak louder than words and all that.

I believe what you describe is a symptom of BPD, or borderline personality disorder. It's an unenviable mental state, as we otherwise operate within the real world of grays and compromises, rather than black-and-white absolutes.
46.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 8, 2016, 16:41
46.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 8, 2016, 16:41
Aug 8, 2016, 16:41
 
The router is almost always the weakest security link of any network. The notion that a consumer grade router would actually protect you from anything is just hilarious.

This place has become a cesspool of bad IT advice.
Avatar 56185
45.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 8, 2016, 16:16
Verno
 
45.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 8, 2016, 16:16
Aug 8, 2016, 16:16
 Verno
 
shiho wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 15:52:
Most of which can't even reach your average PC behind a router. And are faster stopped by an antivirus with network intrusion detection than laggy Microsoft patches.

NAT is not security and given the sheer number of security issues with most consumer routers I wouldn't rely on them either. Microsoft security patches are very fast these days by the way. I don't really know of any consumer software that does decent intrusion detection (lol at anyone who even suggest something like ZoneAlarm), pfSense or DIY is the only realistic option there. If you're going to use an old operating system like Windows 7 then you should definitely have Windows Update on, just pick the updates you want at least. Having it off is just silly and will lead to a compromised machine. I remember when unpatched XP machines could be infected in minutes due to all of the port scanning and automated blasting of various exploits, NAT didn't save anyone then either.

Cluster updates are not at all preferable to constant updates as anyone who has been around before WSUS can attest to. Large updates tend to break a lot of things and while the new update processes have their own issues, I find them fairly minor by comparison.

If you trust Microsoft to build the operating system you use every day then I don't see how you fail to trust them to deliver updates for it. If I really didn't trust Microsoft I simply would not use their products. There's this odd disconnect where people seemingly hate Windows or Microsoft while they continually use the product happily every day. Microsoft has plenty of shitty policies and by all means criticize them for it but if people really distrust or dislike the company that much then speak with your wallet and use something else. Actions speak louder than words and all that.
Playing: Risk of Rain 2, Jedi Fallen Order, Last of Us II
Watching: Tenet, Peninsula, The Pale Door
Avatar 51617
44.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 8, 2016, 15:52
44.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 8, 2016, 15:52
Aug 8, 2016, 15:52
 
RedEye9 wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 14:53:
I am glad people recognize my superiority, it makes me feel good.
But it is ok to question me no matter what some might think.

If you turn off automatic updating, and you don't remember to be vigilant, your PC will rarely if ever get patched. You'll be one of a minority with wide-open security holes.

Most of which can't even reach your average PC behind a router. And are faster stopped by an antivirus with network intrusion detection than laggy Microsoft patches. And have new security holes or plain instability in them, which could as well be more severe than the old ones, given Microsoft's lackluster QA.

As I said before, installing their 0-day patches is like installing NVidia drivers on release day. I prefer to do this in update packs, after all the scandals and crashes have been investigated and fixed.
43.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 8, 2016, 14:53
43.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 8, 2016, 14:53
Aug 8, 2016, 14:53
 
El Pit wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 12:27:
HorrorScope wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 00:46:
RedEye9 wrote on Aug 7, 2016, 23:13:
You should never disable Windows Update.


Why?
Thou shalt not question him! Just BELIEVE!

I am glad people recognize my superiority, it makes me feel good.
But it is ok to question me no matter what some might think.

If you turn off automatic updating, and you don't remember to be vigilant, your PC will rarely if ever get patched. You'll be one of a minority with wide-open security holes.

As has been previously stated, Windows 10 does not abide by the rules and will probably turn on WinUp no matter what you do.
A mask is not a political statement. It's an IQ test.
Avatar 58135
42.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
Aug 8, 2016, 13:07
42.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs Aug 8, 2016, 13:07
Aug 8, 2016, 13:07
 
eRe4s3r wrote on Aug 7, 2016, 20:44:
HorrorScope wrote on Aug 7, 2016, 17:14:
Creston wrote on Aug 7, 2016, 17:06:
HorrorScope wrote on Aug 7, 2016, 16:37:
For example this article shows what I think we all know, stop Update Service... and if that works, then really what in gods name is all the fuss about? This is one of the oldest tricks in the book. I assume there is something funny going on where it doesn't work, system goes in and stealth starts it any way, otherwise the "You can't stop updates" is one of the most grossly reported issues in the history of Windows feardom.

http://mspoweruser.com/turn-off-windows-update-windows-10/

The update service isn't actually RUNNING on W10 all the time. It gets turned on by something, presumably in the registry, but could just as easily be something hardcoded somewhere, checks for updates, installs them, then the service gets turned off again.

Simply disabling the service does exactly 0% against stopping those updates from being installed. (on Home Premium anyway.)

Any link to that? I'm not disagreeing though, I assumed some funny business has to be happening with what you hear. However I have links of doing this and MS confirming it works to, articles from this year. They warn you against doing it because it could stop critical security updates, but I don't fear those.

Group policy has intervals set for update checks that will restart stopped services. Not sure they will trigger them out of disabled state though. In fact that would be really weird if a service could bring another service out of disabled state. So I assume this still works as it always does, disables WU completely if set to disabled, does do nothing if set to stop/don't auto start or the likes.

I had mine disabled and it somehow turned itself back on again. So it's purely anecdotal, but in my experience, it gladly ignores what you tell it to do and just does whatever Microsoft feels like doing.
Avatar 15604
41.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
Aug 8, 2016, 12:40
41.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs Aug 8, 2016, 12:40
Aug 8, 2016, 12:40
 
NetHead wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 12:26:
LiTh wrote on Aug 7, 2016, 15:16:
Nothing more enjoyable then watching Blues posters bitch and moan about microsoft as they post from their microsoft OS's.

So people shouldn't, bitch and moan, about thing they use causing problems?

Especially when there are so many alternatives...

Infallible logic you have there.

I don't see that many alternatives if any for what I do at this time.

One thing we have to protect ourselves from in general, is taking a report on the internet and assuming it affects a lot of people.

We have to think everyone that has upgraded anything, windows, linux, that a person out there has seen a fairly unique issue from all sorts of things.

When one is on a witch hunt you look for a problem and magnify it, but reading about someone losing a linux partition, a controller not working, steam not displaying right. Well with millions of people there are going to be reports of all kinds of problems but are they widespread?

If I want to gravitate to any issue a random person reports, I can find every O/S to be a complete fail, because random people everywhere have random issues on everything.

That said, I am willing to find fault with Win10 if it deserves it. I get those that don't want to touch it due to spying if you will. As others have said, you should pretty much count on Win7 and Win8 as a spy machine as well, it's what they do. But if you are like me, measure what you are doing, recognize I do have smart phones as well that spy. I was able to overcome that obstacle.

So now I'm dealing with more general nuts and bolt of daily use, I can tell you early reports... it isn't a struggle.
Avatar 17232
40.
 
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues
Aug 8, 2016, 12:27
El Pit
 
40.
Re: Xbox One Controller Windows Issues Aug 8, 2016, 12:27
Aug 8, 2016, 12:27
 El Pit
 
HorrorScope wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 00:46:
RedEye9 wrote on Aug 7, 2016, 23:13:
You should never disable Windows Update.


Why?

Thou shalt not question him, faithless peon! Just BELIEVE! (It is actually like believing that Star Citizen is on the road to a gold master!)
"There is no right life in the wrong one." (Theodor W. Adorno, philosopher)
"Only a Sith deals in absolutes." (Obi-Wan Kenobi, Jedi)
39.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
Aug 8, 2016, 12:26
39.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs Aug 8, 2016, 12:26
Aug 8, 2016, 12:26
 
LiTh wrote on Aug 7, 2016, 15:16:
Nothing more enjoyable then watching Blues posters bitch and moan about microsoft as they post from their microsoft OS's.

So people shouldn't, bitch and moan, about thing they use causing problems?

Especially when there are so many alternatives...

Infallible logic you have there.
38.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
Aug 8, 2016, 12:25
El Pit
 
38.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs Aug 8, 2016, 12:25
Aug 8, 2016, 12:25
 El Pit
 
shiho wrote on Aug 8, 2016, 04:43:
El Pit wrote on Aug 7, 2016, 17:00:
HorrorScope, this is about emotions, not about facts! ;)

... as you demonstrate with remarkable clarity.

Yes, I can be angered if some people proudly present their bigotry and lack of knowledge. But it's alright. That is what the Ignore-button is for. One click, and Blue's News becomes a much better place.
"There is no right life in the wrong one." (Theodor W. Adorno, philosopher)
"Only a Sith deals in absolutes." (Obi-Wan Kenobi, Jedi)
57 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 1.
Newer [  1  2  3  ] Older