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Re: etc.
Jul 10, 2016, 19:34
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Re: etc. Jul 10, 2016, 19:34
Jul 10, 2016, 19:34
 
One of the things I liked about the original Gothic was the scale.

Most CRPGs fudge with the scale of the world; Skyrim, for instance, is supposedly the northern half of a huge continent but you can still walk across it in a few hours. I'm not complaining (much); by compressing everything the player is assured of having an exciting adventure every time he boots the game and it reduces the expense of world-building. Daggerfall, often used as a counter-example, has a much larger world but it suffers in pacing and detail. Between the two, I prefer the compressed version (of course, given the option I'd love a game the size of Daggerfall but with the detail of Skyrim... but that's not going to happen anytime soon; it would take decades to fill in all the nooks and crannies).

Gothic though (this was a post about Gothic, remember?) was set in a small valley, just a few miles across. It was /purposefully/ small and it helped the fiction dramatically. It explained why there were three villages just a mile or so apart and why each village had only a few dozen people living there. You didn't have to turn a blind eye to the limitations forced on the developers by the underlying mechanics of the simulation; instead, they used those limitations to build up the setting. It was clever world-building that went a long way to enhancing the feeling of immersion.

Unfortunately, the later Gothic games forwent this tactic and tried to simulate whole continents. As a player, you had to purposefully ignore how tiny the world was, and - while Gothic 2 and 3 were both good games - they also suffered a little bit from their expansiveness.

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