Out of the Blue

Well, when it rains it pours. I mentioned my recent trip to the doctor to test for Lyme or whatever was causing some symptoms I was showing. The results were negative, but a couple of weeks later I still don't feel 100%, and I am at the point where I'm trying to decide if this is a concern, or just a bug that's lingering longer than expected. Now to pile on, I also now have a mysterious elbow issue, which started out as a minor irritation and has grown to be a genuine pain that actually woke me up a couple of times overnight. This is a soreness in the small area between the bottom of the triceps and the top of the elbow that's most sensitive to trying to extend it versus resistance, which my Googling around suggests is most likely elbow tendinitis. That's all well and good, but since I spend a lot of effort avoiding physical labor, I simply have no idea what might have provoked such a thing. I don't think the two issues are related, though achy joints early on was the reason I got tested for Lyme. Anyway, the elbow I can take a wait and see attitude with, but if I am still feeling sickly after the weekend I think I will go back to the doctor and escalate things.

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50 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 1.
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50.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 17:47
50.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 17:47
Jun 25, 2016, 17:47
 
jdreyer wrote on Jun 25, 2016, 02:33:
@Shihonage, nice site, I agree. And I see that you've been active in the comments and have a lot of experience to share. Well done.

Also, may I complement you on your English.

Thank you jdreyer
49.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 11:27
49.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 11:27
Jun 25, 2016, 11:27
 
El Pit wrote on Jun 25, 2016, 09:09:
jdreyer wrote on Jun 25, 2016, 01:49:
El Pit wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 13:27:
Get well soon, Blue. Most likely it is nothing serious, so do not let it drag you down. In the end it might be more harmful to think too much about what it could be and waste time and energy on googling possible solutions. Go and see the doc and do not burden yourself with too many worries.

I disagree, educating yourself so you can discuss your symptoms intelligently with your doctor can produce superior outcomes.

And I disagree with you - it gives people wrong ideas and makes them often think of cancer when it is usually something completely different. Too often they walk into a doctor's room and do not want to hear a different diagnosis than the one they googled.

And my story on this one... Switched providers, got a new doctor and well he was one chill dude. I felt from the first time I met him until the last moments him being my Dr, that this is one of those Doc's who gets into the med cabinets for themselves. Just really laid back, smooth and groovy talker, chilled to the nines.

But hey I don't want to make a rash judgment, maybe this is simply one cool cat and is smart as fuck. I can dig it. But then we started going down the path of "what's going on Doc?" he had first crack at my breathing issue. I noticed over a period of visits and emails, he wasn't really giving me anything, he'd prescribe me a med to mask some parts of it, which none of that was even close to being good the affect or result, but beyond that I knew a med wasn't going to lead to a fix. I ended up going to a specialist and when they asked what I was taking the very first thing was "get off that med" that is for psychotic behavior and has nothing to do with the issue at hand.

Back to Dr. Chill, so after a bit I'd suggest maybe we try this after playing Google MD myself since it was going nowhere. His reply to like 2 or 3 times I did that each time was "yeah that sounds like a good next step to try". This dude was mailing it in, me and the wife really just laughed it off in a sense once he started repeating this effort back to me.

After a couple times, I knew this wasn't the guy to lead me anywhere. Switched providers again back to my other Dr, he tries but damn any specialist he sends me to cost dearly and they are shooting in the dark too much for me to just pay all these "good tries".

I still can't get over a $1200 charge for a Nose/Ears Dr. looking up my nostrils all of 15 seconds to tell me I have a deviated septum up the right side and that surgery is an option if I want. I only know of this $1200 charge month's after as the bills come in.

Did I mention the American health care system and how it works is shit yet? With growing deductibles and unlisted costs and bill after bill, to think we had a revolution over taxing tea and not this...
Avatar 17232
48.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 11:11
48.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 11:11
Jun 25, 2016, 11:11
 
jdreyer wrote on Jun 25, 2016, 02:20:
HorrorScope wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 20:04:
Also put your monitor up as high as you can tolerate, it is much better for the neck looking upwards at your screen vs looking downward per a chiropractor I use from time to time. He did some xrays and attributes some of my current structure to using a lower pc monitor too often. It could be one of the reasons my apnea became a problem for me.

I'm not sure what you mean exactly about "put your monitor up as high as possible" but every article I've read on the subject has said to have your eyes level with the top of the monitor or perhaps a couple inches lower. Then you can keep your posture straight and simply let your eyeballs fall to read lower text (their resting state is 30 degrees or so below horizon). Craning your neck up can be just as bad as slumping it forward.

BLUE, it sounds like an RSI from all the PC work you do. I'm sure you've already done a lot of reading on your workstation ergonomics, but if not here's a decent starter article.

It does also depend on chair and posture, but what you don't want to do is have your head lean downward, chin towards chest. You perhaps are explaining a perfect scenario, but for those that don't sit up all perky all the time....

For example stand up and look forward, now look downward, your chin becomes closer to your chest and it compresses your neck/air-path, it also if done for extended periods of time moves your neck forward vs a neutral position, where it should be.

Now when you sit and look at your monitor are you doing that with your head, bending it down closer to your chest? If you are, you have poor posture. Now you can sit up, do not use a high back chair etc to correct it that way or another way is you can raise the monitor higher to bring your chin up level in that manner.

Via xrays, I have a forward positioned neck now and my esophagus has one set of cartilage (probably not using the right term here) that are pinched together vs being separated like they should, they contributed that to using a lowered monitor often and having my chin down for too long a time. Told me it is very common with people who use computers and without saying having poor posture doing so.

So chin up everyone!
Avatar 17232
47.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 10:29
47.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 10:29
Jun 25, 2016, 10:29
 
I suspect it is totally dependent on your personality.

As I mentioned before, I have a sister who is a bit of a health nut. She also has more medical problems than most people -- including acid reflux. She has on more than one occasion questioned her doctor saying effectively, "should we consider xyz." Only to have the doctor say, "Hmm, could be. We can test for it." and turn out to be right.

On the other hand, I can believe many people would worry themselves into more serious issues than they had to begin with. Or worse, convince themselves they have some ailment and do some kind of self treatment which at best, delays proper treatment.
"Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedies." -- Groucho Marx
46.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 09:09
El Pit
 
46.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 09:09
Jun 25, 2016, 09:09
 El Pit
 
jdreyer wrote on Jun 25, 2016, 01:49:
El Pit wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 13:27:
Get well soon, Blue. Most likely it is nothing serious, so do not let it drag you down. In the end it might be more harmful to think too much about what it could be and waste time and energy on googling possible solutions. Go and see the doc and do not burden yourself with too many worries.

I disagree, educating yourself so you can discuss your symptoms intelligently with your doctor can produce superior outcomes.

And I disagree with you - it gives people wrong ideas and makes them often think of cancer when it is usually something completely different. Too often they walk into a doctor's room and do not want to hear a different diagnosis than the one they googled.
"There is no right life in the wrong one." (Theodor W. Adorno, philosopher)
"Only a Sith deals in absolutes." (Obi-Wan Kenobi, Jedi)
45.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 02:33
45.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 02:33
Jun 25, 2016, 02:33
 
@Shihonage, nice site, I agree. And I see that you've been active in the comments and have a lot of experience to share. Well done.

Also, may I complement you on your English.
To prevent CV-19, avoid the Serious Seven: weddings, funerals, faith-based activities, bars, gyms, house gatherings and other small events.
Avatar 22024
44.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 02:20
44.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 02:20
Jun 25, 2016, 02:20
 
HorrorScope wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 20:04:
Also put your monitor up as high as you can tolerate, it is much better for the neck looking upwards at your screen vs looking downward per a chiropractor I use from time to time. He did some xrays and attributes some of my current structure to using a lower pc monitor too often. It could be one of the reasons my apnea became a problem for me.

I'm not sure what you mean exactly about "put your monitor up as high as possible" but every article I've read on the subject has said to have your eyes level with the top of the monitor or perhaps a couple inches lower. Then you can keep your posture straight and simply let your eyeballs fall to read lower text (their resting state is 30 degrees or so below horizon). Craning your neck up can be just as bad as slumping it forward.

BLUE, it sounds like an RSI from all the PC work you do. I'm sure you've already done a lot of reading on your workstation ergonomics, but if not here's a decent starter article.
To prevent CV-19, avoid the Serious Seven: weddings, funerals, faith-based activities, bars, gyms, house gatherings and other small events.
Avatar 22024
43.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 02:04
43.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 02:04
Jun 25, 2016, 02:04
 
Cutter wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 18:09:
Good site you have there. Acid reflux is common in our family and I know I get it quite easily when my diet isn't alkaline enough. It's always the first indicator I'm not eating right and need to do a course adjustment.

Yeah, getting old sux ballz. I started getting acid reflux 10 years ago right around the time I got cancer (I got better). I avoid flare-ups by 1) never drinking Coke or other soda, 2) avoiding large meals, especially at night, 3) avoiding greasy food, and 4) sleeping on my left side to keep the stomach contents away from the lower esophageal sphincter. Some also say not to drink alcohol, as it loosens the sphincter allowing the acid back up the esophagus, but I've never found that to be the case.

If I sense a attack coming on, I take 2 max strength Tums and a famotidine pill and sleep sitting up. If I don't, I'll be up most of the night with someone twisting a knife in my back. Not fun.
To prevent CV-19, avoid the Serious Seven: weddings, funerals, faith-based activities, bars, gyms, house gatherings and other small events.
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42.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 01:49
42.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 01:49
Jun 25, 2016, 01:49
 
El Pit wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 13:27:
Get well soon, Blue. Most likely it is nothing serious, so do not let it drag you down. In the end it might be more harmful to think too much about what it could be and waste time and energy on googling possible solutions. Go and see the doc and do not burden yourself with too many worries.

I disagree, educating yourself so you can discuss your symptoms intelligently with your doctor can produce superior outcomes.
To prevent CV-19, avoid the Serious Seven: weddings, funerals, faith-based activities, bars, gyms, house gatherings and other small events.
Avatar 22024
41.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 01:34
41.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 01:34
Jun 25, 2016, 01:34
 
Necrophob wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 12:00:
Apparently there's something known as "Computer Elbow" (similar to Tennis Elbow). Might be that. I know I've had elbow pain on occasion, and my job has me typing all day.

But Blue doesn't type. He had a USB port installed in his skull a few years back and just downloads directly from brain to site.
To prevent CV-19, avoid the Serious Seven: weddings, funerals, faith-based activities, bars, gyms, house gatherings and other small events.
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40.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 01:32
40.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 01:32
Jun 25, 2016, 01:32
 
Killer Kane wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 11:02:
So it hurts when you extend your elbow???



...don't do that

You sound like my Dr.
To prevent CV-19, avoid the Serious Seven: weddings, funerals, faith-based activities, bars, gyms, house gatherings and other small events.
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39.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 01:03
39.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 01:03
Jun 25, 2016, 01:03
 
nin wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 21:21:
Oh, I know. I'd either wake up with no air in my lungs, gasping for breath (like an asthma attack) or have dreams where I was underwater, drowning and couldn't make it to the surface (again, no air)...

The thing that finally brought me to the table was a stat that said something like 70% of stroke patients had previous sleep apnea symptoms. I pretty much went straight to the doctor after reading that...

Huh, that IS interesting. I never knew that statistic and my wife said that she heard me frequently stop breathing while I slept. She said she would just punch or kick me and i'd start breathing again...And then I had a stroke hmmmmm.
Avatar 57335
38.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 25, 2016, 00:44
38.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 25, 2016, 00:44
Jun 25, 2016, 00:44
 
Blue, you already got checked for Mono?
Avatar 22376
37.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 24, 2016, 21:37
37.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 24, 2016, 21:37
Jun 24, 2016, 21:37
 
nin wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 21:21:
HorrorScope wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 19:14:
Yep and it happens with age. I've had it for a good while, but it came to a point it was causing real issues. I didn't know about any of it, but then you start to realize, shit I was living with that for years remembering signs.

You ever sleep and then something snaps in your dream and you wake up immediately? I've been able with me to figure out that is a part of holding your breath and your brain saying, breath or wake the f up! The dream plays along with this pressing need.

Oh, I know. I'd either wake up with no air in my lungs, gasping for breath (like an asthma attack) or have dreams where I was underwater, drowning and couldn't make it to the surface (again, no air)...

The thing that finally brought me to the table was a stat that said something like 70% of stroke patients had previous sleep apnea symptoms. I pretty much went straight to the doctor after reading that...


In my case it took two episodes.

Sleeping in the middle of the night a loud gong went off in my head. Woke up and was dizzy beyond belief. Go to rest room, back to bed, felt like I was up all night hammering alcohol.

A couple nights later I was dreaming that this was going to happen again. And this is where dreams and the mind get very strange, a best bud and myself were building a massive shield like comic book levels as we knew a light beam was going to shoot up from below and hit my brain and we were going to stop this NOW! Well the beam came up and wiped out this shield no sweat at all, total fail and I woke up again, this time with a bang and dizziness not quite as bad as the first time. Looking back on that one, I assume if the shield was strong enough I would have passed away.

So yep, start going to docs, sleep studies etc. Another part of the equation I have a cat that likes to move up during the middle of the night and it laying close to me while sleeping seemed to amplify the situation.

So I was tested, I stop breathing around 25 or so times per minute, which isn't good, but several have it worse, it's a crazy number to think about, per minute that many times. I've now come to see I hold my breath when I'm deep thinking or putting a lot of attention towards something while awake. I notice sometimes if I nap, that again my breathing just wants to slow to a point of stopping. Mild headaches ensue.

So yeah it's messed up, but using standard solutions those are helping out. I do feel it could be shaving off a solid 10 years, sort of the inner feeling I have about it all, life policies strengthened up a bit more. I'm sure I've taken some membrane damage as well over the years, but not that anyone else notices, I think it has also mellowed me out a lot.

Then I find out I have a deviated septum at 95% up the right nose barrel. That I've had my whole life. By this time I sound like a broken wreck right? But I'm 175, 6', little bit o belly, don't really get sick, just a couple oxygen to the brain issues and some random aches and pains from time to time.
Avatar 17232
36.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 24, 2016, 21:21
nin
 
36.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 24, 2016, 21:21
Jun 24, 2016, 21:21
 nin
 
HorrorScope wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 19:14:
Yep and it happens with age. I've had it for a good while, but it came to a point it was causing real issues. I didn't know about any of it, but then you start to realize, shit I was living with that for years remembering signs.

You ever sleep and then something snaps in your dream and you wake up immediately? I've been able with me to figure out that is a part of holding your breath and your brain saying, breath or wake the f up! The dream plays along with this pressing need.

Oh, I know. I'd either wake up with no air in my lungs, gasping for breath (like an asthma attack) or have dreams where I was underwater, drowning and couldn't make it to the surface (again, no air)...

The thing that finally brought me to the table was a stat that said something like 70% of stroke patients had previous sleep apnea symptoms. I pretty much went straight to the doctor after reading that...

35.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 24, 2016, 20:08
35.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 24, 2016, 20:08
Jun 24, 2016, 20:08
 
Necrophob wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 12:00:
Apparently there's something known as "Computer Elbow" (similar to Tennis Elbow). Might be that. I know I've had elbow pain on occasion, and my job has me typing all day.

I get that when I get a few days off and decide to do a couple marathon gaming sessions. I can press on the outside of my elbow joint to get a bit of pain. For me, it's probably just a pinched nerve because one Valium before a night of sleep takes care of it. Before you ask, I have a back and neck injury from letting a noob get me in a choke so he could practice. He absolutely wrenched on me. Anyway, I take one pill like every 3 or 4 months when I get an aggravating pain that wont go away after a few days.

One other thing Blue. Seeing as this site has been around for so long, ya know you could be suffering from old age
34.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 24, 2016, 20:04
34.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 24, 2016, 20:04
Jun 24, 2016, 20:04
 
edgar wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 19:29:
Necrophob wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 12:00:
Apparently there's something known as "Computer Elbow" (similar to Tennis Elbow). Might be that. I know I've had elbow pain on occasion, and my job has me typing all day.

I was going to mention this one as well. I was at a physical therapist for unrelated pain, mentioned my elbow, he poked and prodded as he asked questions about my job, then said, "You lean on that elbow while at your desk, don't you?"

"Um, yah." And that was it. Whenever it hurts again, I pay attention, and sure enough, I'm leaning on my left elbow again while pondering my next line of code.

Feel better!

Yes PC related ache's and pains. I think it is somewhat common for people to put their mouse elbow on a table to control the mouse. As you age that most likely will become an issue for your upper back or elbow. I've changed to a side table and my arm is free floating below with with my wrist on the tables edge controlling the mouse. This has worked for me, I would assume someone may have a wrist issue, but it cleared up a high back pain I was now getting, I don't have any ache's now do to mousing around.

Also put your monitor up as high as you can tolerate, it is much better for the neck looking upwards at your screen vs looking downward per a chiropractor I use from time to time. He did some xrays and attributes some of my current structure to using a lower pc monitor too often. It could be one of the reasons my apnea became a problem for me.
Avatar 17232
33.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 24, 2016, 19:43
33.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 24, 2016, 19:43
Jun 24, 2016, 19:43
 
Cutter wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 18:14:
Creston wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 17:29:
That said, I do agree it's likely just "getting old." Random shit hurts for me just about every single day. You just get used to it like every other person that gets old.

No, getting old and things like Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, MS, Lyme, etc. aren't remotely the same. It's not like being tired after a hard day's work, it's feeling exhausted, constantly, like you've been going days without any sort of rest. You can feel that things are off in your body and it's not at all the normal part of the aging process. You don't just wake up one day in your 40s and you're exhausted for the rest of your days. It's deffo biochemical in nature.


I was referring to Blue's elbow hurting, but admittedly that wasn't clear in my actual post. Btw, a far easier explanation for being fatigued all the time (and also something that far, far more people suffer from) is sleep apnea.

Avatar 15604
32.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 24, 2016, 19:29
32.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 24, 2016, 19:29
Jun 24, 2016, 19:29
 
Necrophob wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 12:00:
Apparently there's something known as "Computer Elbow" (similar to Tennis Elbow). Might be that. I know I've had elbow pain on occasion, and my job has me typing all day.

I was going to mention this one as well. I was at a physical therapist for unrelated pain, mentioned my elbow, he poked and prodded as he asked questions about my job, then said, "You lean on that elbow while at your desk, don't you?"

"Um, yah." And that was it. Whenever it hurts again, I pay attention, and sure enough, I'm leaning on my left elbow again while pondering my next line of code.

Feel better!
31.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Jun 24, 2016, 19:26
31.
Re: Out of the Blue Jun 24, 2016, 19:26
Jun 24, 2016, 19:26
 
Cutter wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 18:14:
Creston wrote on Jun 24, 2016, 17:29:
That said, I do agree it's likely just "getting old." Random shit hurts for me just about every single day. You just get used to it like every other person that gets old.

No, getting old and things like Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, MS, Lyme, etc. aren't remotely the same. It's not like being tired after a hard day's work, it's feeling exhausted, constantly, like you've been going days without any sort of rest. You can feel that things are off in your body and it's not at all the normal part of the aging process. You don't just wake up one day in your 40s and you're exhausted for the rest of your days. It's deffo biochemical in nature.


Yeah I can't argue against that, but again the cost and finding a Dr willing to work with you figuring it all out... Good luck. So I think a lot of us, just take it as getting older. My wife has a thyroid issue, at least that was able to be diagnosed and now she's on a med the rest of her life to keep her balanced. Otherwise hot flashes and chronic fatigue kick in.
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