Out of the Blue

Mentioning my goal yesterday of having my next PC be near-silent set me off to see if I could quiet this one down in the meantime. What was getting to me was a little higher pitched than typical fan noise, so my initial thought that this might be coil whine that I was not going to be able to do anything about. Looking at some diagnostics and monitors, however, showed me these two little "assistant fans" on my ASUS Sabertooth motherboard were working their little asses off, and sure enough, reducing their speed made all the difference in the world. The funny thing is these hardly make a difference in temperatures, so slowing them down seems harmless, and I compensated by cranking all three of my case's 120 MM fans to 100%, which increased their noise not at all, so now all I hear is the gentle whoosh of the larger fans. I did have a funny moment when I grew concerned that my USB 3.0 chipset was running 10 degrees hotter than my CPU, but then I realized that 46ºC is only around 115ºF, which is obviously nothing to worry about. I just checked and it's currently at all of 40ºC while the mildly overclocked CPU is at 30ºC, so this PC is just one cool cat. I should probably just switch these things to the more American-friendly Fahrenheit, but Celsius seems so much more cool and sciencey that it would feel like a downgrade.

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Why Flying is So Expensive.
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32.
 
Re: Why Flying Is So Expensive
May 15, 2016, 22:02
Ant
 
32.
Re: Why Flying Is So Expensive May 15, 2016, 22:02
May 15, 2016, 22:02
 Ant
 
jdreyer wrote on May 12, 2016, 14:06:
VaranDragon wrote on May 12, 2016, 10:39:
Thanks for using the Celsius scale Blue

I demand you downgrade to the inferior AMERICAN system immediately! Because America is always right!
F**K yeah!
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31.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 13, 2016, 22:22
31.
Re: Out of the Blue May 13, 2016, 22:22
May 13, 2016, 22:22
 
Quboid wrote on May 13, 2016, 17:33:
During a heatwave of about 27 °C a few years back, a nearby hospital sent a warning to parents of newborns to take the child to the local supermarket's chilled food section during the warmest part of the day. I'd be getting worried about my elderly neighbour at that point. Few people have air conditioning as we rarely get much over 20 degrees.
Interesting. A lot of people around here wear sweaters at 20C. Not uncommon to have 30C+ with 90%+ humidity for most of August -- heat indexes of over 35C are common.
"Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedies." -- Groucho Marx
30.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 13, 2016, 18:22
30.
Re: Out of the Blue May 13, 2016, 18:22
May 13, 2016, 18:22
 
descender wrote on May 13, 2016, 10:14:
In metric, one milliliter of water occupies one cubic centimeter, weighs one gram, and requires one calorie of energy to heat up by one degree celsius... which is 1 percent of the difference between its freezing point and its boiling point. An volume of hydrogen weighing one gram has exactly one mole of atoms in it. Whereas... in the American system, the answer to ‘How much energy does it take to boil a room-temperature gallon of water?’ is ‘Go fuck yourself,’ because you can’t directly relate any of those quantities.” -- Wild Thing by Josh Bazell.

Haha, that's awesome.
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29.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 13, 2016, 17:44
29.
Re: Out of the Blue May 13, 2016, 17:44
May 13, 2016, 17:44
 
I don't know why, but I've never really seen anyone (including Americans) use Fahrenheit for PC temperatures. I don't really even know offhand what appropriate temps are for CPU/MB on that scale, even though I use it for everything else.
28.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 13, 2016, 17:33
Quboid
 
28.
Re: Out of the Blue May 13, 2016, 17:33
May 13, 2016, 17:33
 Quboid
 
Mr. Tact wrote on May 13, 2016, 13:48:
Quboid wrote on May 13, 2016, 09:31:
Blue talked about this in OotB a while back. Since then I've found Fahrenheit to be a bit easier to understand but all the same, 0 F and 100 F aren't that much use. That corresponds to -17C and 38C, either of which would be about 10 degrees Celsius past triggering a national emergency.
Where would 38C would be a national emergency, Greenland?

I don't actually know if there is a threshold for a national emergency but I'm in Northern Ireland, the highest temperature ever recorded here is 30.8 °C.

During a heatwave of about 27 °C a few years back, a nearby hospital sent a warning to parents of newborns to take the child to the local supermarket's chilled food section during the warmest part of the day. I'd be getting worried about my elderly neighbour at that point. Few people have air conditioning as we rarely get much over 20 degrees.
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27.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 13, 2016, 13:48
27.
Re: Out of the Blue May 13, 2016, 13:48
May 13, 2016, 13:48
 
Quboid wrote on May 13, 2016, 09:31:
Blue talked about this in OotB a while back. Since then I've found Fahrenheit to be a bit easier to understand but all the same, 0 F and 100 F aren't that much use. That corresponds to -17C and 38C, either of which would be about 10 degrees Celsius past triggering a national emergency.
Where would 38C would be a national emergency, Greenland?
"Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedies." -- Groucho Marx
26.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 13, 2016, 10:14
26.
Re: Out of the Blue May 13, 2016, 10:14
May 13, 2016, 10:14
 
In metric, one milliliter of water occupies one cubic centimeter, weighs one gram, and requires one calorie of energy to heat up by one degree celsius... which is 1 percent of the difference between its freezing point and its boiling point. An volume of hydrogen weighing one gram has exactly one mole of atoms in it. Whereas... in the American system, the answer to ‘How much energy does it take to boil a room-temperature gallon of water?’ is ‘Go fuck yourself,’ because you can’t directly relate any of those quantities.” -- Wild Thing by Josh Bazell.
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25.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 13, 2016, 09:31
Quboid
 
25.
Re: Out of the Blue May 13, 2016, 09:31
May 13, 2016, 09:31
 Quboid
 
SunnyD wrote on May 12, 2016, 19:46:
Pigeon wrote on May 12, 2016, 17:01:
I remember hearing or reading somewhere that Fahrenheit is generally better for relating temperature in increments that align more with human comfort levels.

I remember reading the same thing http://cdn.webfail.com/upl/img/d3e1289c2ee/post2.jpg

Fahrenheit just seems warm and fuzzier.

~Finis~

Blue talked about this in OotB a while back. Since then I've found Fahrenheit to be a bit easier to understand but all the same, 0 F and 100 F aren't that much use. That corresponds to -17C and 38C, either of which would be about 10 degrees Celsius past triggering a national emergency.
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24.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 12, 2016, 23:00
24.
Re: Out of the Blue May 12, 2016, 23:00
May 12, 2016, 23:00
 
bigspender wrote on May 12, 2016, 21:51:
SunnyD wrote on May 12, 2016, 19:46:
Pigeon wrote on May 12, 2016, 17:01:
I remember hearing or reading somewhere that Fahrenheit is generally better for relating temperature in increments that align more with human comfort levels.

I remember reading the same thing http://cdn.webfail.com/upl/img/d3e1289c2ee/post2.jpg

Fahrenheit just seems warm and fuzzier.


~Finis~

I've grown up with celsius so I might be biased, but seems easy to remember that at 0 degrees water freezes solid, and 100 degrees water boils into a gas.

which is why metric is better for science, but imp. is better for common human uses, which is why we stuck with it. a hot day being 100 degrees makes more sense to me than 35C. to me there's no discernible difference between 25C and 35C. also i'd rather be 5'9" than 170cm. inches and feet are more practical to me than centimeters and meters - it's easier to estimate what percentage of a foot something is than what percent of a meter.
23.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 12, 2016, 21:51
23.
Re: Out of the Blue May 12, 2016, 21:51
May 12, 2016, 21:51
 
SunnyD wrote on May 12, 2016, 19:46:
Pigeon wrote on May 12, 2016, 17:01:
I remember hearing or reading somewhere that Fahrenheit is generally better for relating temperature in increments that align more with human comfort levels.

I remember reading the same thing http://cdn.webfail.com/upl/img/d3e1289c2ee/post2.jpg

Fahrenheit just seems warm and fuzzier.


~Finis~

I've grown up with celsius so I might be biased, but seems easy to remember that at 0 degrees water freezes solid, and 100 degrees water boils into a gas.
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22.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 12, 2016, 19:46
22.
Re: Out of the Blue May 12, 2016, 19:46
May 12, 2016, 19:46
 
Pigeon wrote on May 12, 2016, 17:01:
I remember hearing or reading somewhere that Fahrenheit is generally better for relating temperature in increments that align more with human comfort levels.

I remember reading the same thing http://cdn.webfail.com/upl/img/d3e1289c2ee/post2.jpg

Fahrenheit just seems warm and fuzzier.


~Finis~
21.
 
Re: Why Flying Is So Expensive
May 12, 2016, 18:01
21.
Re: Why Flying Is So Expensive May 12, 2016, 18:01
May 12, 2016, 18:01
 
BobBob wrote on May 12, 2016, 12:14:
Metric making so much more sense, the continued use of antiquated standard feels embarrassing.

Agreed, except for temperature. Since Fahrenheit is based on human body temperature, and it has finer whole number values, it more relate-able and usable than Celsius. Unlike a lot of other imperial measurements, it's also base10.
20.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 12, 2016, 17:49
20.
Re: Out of the Blue May 12, 2016, 17:49
May 12, 2016, 17:49
 
Quboid wrote on May 12, 2016, 15:17:
jimnms wrote on May 12, 2016, 14:12:
Cutter wrote on May 12, 2016, 11:32:
America: The last holdout from the metric system.

Doesn't England still use miles and gallons?

All of the UK officially uses metric, although long distances uses miles so our speed limits are in MPH with signs along the Irish border warning drivers of the change from/to KPH limits. In practise we use a bit of both depending on our generation. My parents tend to use imperial but are pretty fluent in metric, I use metric but am pretty fluent in ye olde imperial. I'd guess previous and future generations are less bi-lingual in this regard.

Liberia and Myanmar are still holding out.

Then the US and England have more in common in regards to our use of the metric system. I was taught both systems in elementary school. I've always had tools in both metric and imperial. I work on my own vehicles and they've always had a mix of imperial and metric sized nuts and bolts depending on where the part was made, but I think most new cars now are all metric. Every scientific industry moved to metric years ago.

It's mostly the general population that still uses imperial, and it's still mixed. You buy a gallon of milk, but the nutrition label on the back is in metric measurements. Soda has always come in 2-liter bottles since I can remember. It was the smaller "single serving" bottles that were in ounces, but you don't even see those anymore with 500ml bottles replacing the 16oz. bottles.

Creston wrote on May 12, 2016, 16:09:
Yes, but surprisingly enough their miles and gallons are different from the US miles and gallons. Because... well, why the fuck not?!

I knew their gallon was different (bigger?), but I thought their mile was the same.
"The only way anyone can live in peace is if they're prepared to forgive." - The Doctor
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19.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 12, 2016, 17:01
19.
Re: Out of the Blue May 12, 2016, 17:01
May 12, 2016, 17:01
 
Most of my understanding of how long, heavy or hot something is, is based on imperial measurement; however oddly enough anything relating to computer hardware temperature and my brain prefers Celsius. CPU chugging along at 42ºC everything is fine, but if I see 65ºC it's time for some concern.

I remember hearing or reading somewhere that Fahrenheit is generally better for relating temperature in increments that align more with human comfort levels. Even if it is true, I'd assume familiarity with the system weighs much more heavily on how meaningful we find the measurement to be.
18.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 12, 2016, 16:22
Cutter
 
18.
Re: Out of the Blue May 12, 2016, 16:22
May 12, 2016, 16:22
 Cutter
 
Well it's all still a mess here too really. It's not like imperial has ever gone fully away. My dad was a carpenter and most of the guys in my family are tradesmen and they all use imperial. Most everyone I know still uses a mix. Most Canucks - that I know at any rate - still measure their height and weight in feet/inches and pounds. General measurements in feet/inches too though we try and avoid fractions - wth is 5/16th? Volume is metric for sure. Everyone knows what a litre is but would be hard pressed to tell you what a gallon is. I think, however, for the kids coming up today everything will be pure metric from here on in.
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17.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 12, 2016, 16:09
17.
Re: Out of the Blue May 12, 2016, 16:09
May 12, 2016, 16:09
 
jimnms wrote on May 12, 2016, 14:12:
Cutter wrote on May 12, 2016, 11:32:
America: The last holdout from the metric system.

Doesn't England still use miles and gallons?

Yes, but surprisingly enough their miles and gallons are different from the US miles and gallons. Because... well, why the fuck not?!

Sigh
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16.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 12, 2016, 15:17
Quboid
 
16.
Re: Out of the Blue May 12, 2016, 15:17
May 12, 2016, 15:17
 Quboid
 
jimnms wrote on May 12, 2016, 14:12:
Cutter wrote on May 12, 2016, 11:32:
America: The last holdout from the metric system.

Doesn't England still use miles and gallons?

All of the UK officially uses metric, although long distances uses miles so our speed limits are in MPH with signs along the Irish border warning drivers of the change from/to KPH limits. In practise we use a bit of both depending on our generation. My parents tend to use imperial but are pretty fluent in metric, I use metric but am pretty fluent in ye olde imperial. I'd guess previous and future generations are less bi-lingual in this regard.

Liberia and Myanmar are still holding out.

This comment was edited on May 12, 2016, 15:22.
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15.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 12, 2016, 14:27
15.
Re: Out of the Blue May 12, 2016, 14:27
May 12, 2016, 14:27
 
HorrorScope wrote on May 12, 2016, 14:06:
Yes monitoring heat, fan speed, watts used you can really hone it in. I have my bios's set to turn my cpu mhz way down like a 1/3 of max when it doesn't need it and it makes a nice watt savings. Anytime it needs the full speed and that could be just opening a new web page it goes up to max and right back down. While reading a page it's like 1200 mhz... every little bit. Same for fans speeds across the board, have them near off when at certain temps, but scale right up to 100% when gaming. Make sure idle temps are good, over time those can slip. I also run stress tests to make sure when all cores are maxed, that my system all kicks in and works. It's a pretty good feeling when you have that all honed in.

That's how I have my system set up. I'm still using a first generation i5 750, but I've overclocked it to 3.8GHz. At idle it runs at 1.8GHz and the fans spin down to 800-1000 RPM. My GPU doesn't even turn on its fans until it's under load. Outside of gaming, I can barely hear it at all and it's on the desk to my right. It's also a good little audible alarm when something starts to use the CPU, you hear a little whoosh as the fans spin up.

I want to build a new system, but this one keeps up with everything I throw at it. GTA V is the most demanding game I have and it runs with a few things like grass turned down.
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14.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
May 12, 2016, 14:12
14.
Re: Out of the Blue May 12, 2016, 14:12
May 12, 2016, 14:12
 
Cutter wrote on May 12, 2016, 11:32:
America: The last holdout from the metric system.

Doesn't England still use miles and gallons?
"The only way anyone can live in peace is if they're prepared to forgive." - The Doctor
Avatar 17277
13.
 
Re: Why Flying Is So Expensive
May 12, 2016, 14:07
13.
Re: Why Flying Is So Expensive May 12, 2016, 14:07
May 12, 2016, 14:07
 
BobBob wrote on May 12, 2016, 12:14:
Metric making so much more sense, the continued use of antiquated standard feels embarrassing.

Why do you hate America?

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