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18. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 23:18 Megalodon
 
He's got a shift at bestbuy early in the morning, leave him alone already Helmet

 
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17. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 22:20 Axis
 
descender wrote on Aug 14, 2015, 21:08:
/...A link to a top 10 list of advice for home users certainly doesn't warrant all of this enterprise level discussion... so can we stop now? It's friday.

Couldn't agree more, I got some Happi Bedroom time to get in and I don't wanna be thinking about Bluesnews! Allthumbsup
 
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Yours truly,

Axis
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16. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 21:08 descender
 
Where did the goalposts go? I can't see them anymore. I don't think I was disputing that companies utilize offsite physical backups? Only that they rarely physically carry them offsite anymore and that people lose tapes and leave drives on the damn subway (or pretty much anywhere because people are the worst) all the time anyway, even locked in briefcases... so these type of backups are not always more secure than simply uploading them somewhere offsite and are usually only restored from as an absolute last resort. Using split-key encryption or some other fun (not actually fun!) methods can make enterprise level cloud backup extremely secure, but I don't really want to get into all of that right now and it would still be coupled with physical onsite and offsite backups anyway.. A link to a top 10 list of advice for home users certainly doesn't warrant all of this enterprise level discussion... so can we stop now? It's friday.

#3 backup just the files you need locally onto a usb stick, never remotely.
For the exact same reasons that companies need offsite backups, that USB stick melts in a house fire very easily or gets lost or stepped on or eaten by a dog. Who the hell knows. A lot of them just stop working after a while for almost no reason. This is a horrible piece of technology to rely on to backup your personal data.

If you can't get over using "cloud anything" because of tinfoil hat concerns, that's your issue. For most people some form of cloud storage/backup is clearly a more reliable and realistic option than a personal "offsite backup" or a USB stick or the NOTHING that they are currently using. Obviously employing a combination of backup solutions is the best way to go, so the world can fail you in many ways before you actually lose your data. Knowing which of these type of options is the most reliable and secure is not "bad advice" in any way.
 
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15. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 18:57 Axis
 
descender wrote on Aug 14, 2015, 16:03:
Being wrong has never stopped you before, so I'm not surprised by your responses here at all.

those arguments are easy to discuss without devolving into the usual dick beating.

If it's so easy, why is it always your first response? /SMH]

1. Only the insecure and unsure constantly talk about being right or wrong.
2. I was the first reply, you were the first snarky response to me. You or one of the other clowns always are.
3. You should use /SMH even more, it totally doesn't give away that you only just found out about it and like to use faddish things.


Your suggestions for "security"... while admirable on paper... basically don't apply to the real world in any way. I haven't seen a backup physically carried "offsite" in nearly a decade. You couldn't possibly secure an entire company down to the levels you are talking about for the backup to be the weakest link, so someone packet sniffing the encrypted offsite backup is hardly a real world concern.

1. All small businesses I work with employ physical offsite storage.
2. All large businesses I worked with employ physical offsite storage by way of dedicated/leased line to other offices. The smart ones still do. I've been called plenty of times after people like Krowan were removed.
3. Most "real" hacks are internal (and even those tend to be some angry or curious noob who couldn't hack a PB&J). Easy to thwart with tight physical policy.

Was there anything else you'd like to claim in your land of make-believe? You're an odd one descender, sometimes I think you're a decent guy caught up with the slew of buffoons, other times...

 
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Yours truly,

Axis
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14. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 17:12 Creston
 
Burrito of Peace wrote on Aug 14, 2015, 12:43:
Is someone really going to try to make the argument that they need access to policy editing and disk management just to play The Witcher 3?

Well no, of course not. Clearly what you need is Enterprise Admin level.
 
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13. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 16:03 descender
 
Being wrong has never stopped you before, so I'm not surprised by your responses here at all.

those arguments are easy to discuss without devolving into the usual dick beating.

If it's so easy, why is it always your first response? /SMH

Your suggestions for "security"... while admirable on paper... basically don't apply to the real world in any way. I haven't seen a backup physically carried "offsite" in nearly a decade. You couldn't possibly secure an entire company down to the levels you are talking about for the backup to be the weakest link, so someone packet sniffing the encrypted offsite backup is hardly a real world concern.

This comment was edited on Aug 14, 2015, 16:14.
 
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12. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 15:29 Axis
 
descender wrote on Aug 14, 2015, 15:04:
it's called offsite storage, not online

That is an absolutely hysterical response. Obviously the purpose and concept of how online backups work has completely eluded you.


Is it hilarious? What's telling you not realizing that the only secure way to keep offsite storage is by physically moving backups to another site, and not risking exposing your information by trusting any online backup technology or network sniffers. But since we're talking home users, they pretty much just want their photos and documents so a simple 7zipped pass protected stick stuck in a drawer is more than enough.

Hilarious how you think everyone is ganging up on you all the time. You couldn't possibly be wrong. That would be too obvious. It must be "everyone else". /SMH

More things hilarious to you? It's never about right/wrong, those arguments are easy to discuss without devolving into the usual dick beating.

Its about the same few angries looking to be snarky and insulting. Rarely have I read any real substance from any of you, just chest pounding and insults. Then the occasional "look how smart I am!" by throwing out the corporate training manual lessons like king-troll krowen ...

 
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Yours truly,

Axis
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11. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 15:04 descender
 
it's called offsite storage, not online

That is an absolutely hysterical response. Obviously the purpose and concept of how most online/offsite backups work has completely eluded you.

Hilarious how you think everyone is ganging up on you all the time. You couldn't possibly be wrong. That would be too obvious. It must be "everyone else". /SMH

This comment was edited on Aug 14, 2015, 15:25.
 
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10. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 15:01 Axis
 
Scottish Martial Arts wrote on Aug 14, 2015, 14:49:
Another retarded thread on Blues News, brought to you by our recurring sponsor of retarded threads everywhere: Axis!

I noticed that trend too! I make a sensible post, then Descender, Krowen, Darks, harlock, Black, Nin and/or you, same old miserable goons come in to troll forming your usual circle jerk.

Course it's not surprising, that whole flock together thing is strong here.
 
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Yours truly,

Axis
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9. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 14:49 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Another retarded thread on Blues News, brought to you by our recurring sponsor of retarded threads everywhere: Axis!  
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8. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 13:55 Axis
 
Krowen wrote on Aug 14, 2015, 13:48:
I wouldn't deign to listen to anything you had to say, you've already proven yourself to be supremely ignorant on this subject. Nice gay joke, you're a homophobe in addition to an idiot yer pappa must be proud.

We're all done here, you are dismissed.

Someone didn't realize he was already 'done here'.

I never said double dads was good or bad, but it's certainly acceptable. Apparently not by you, my moms would not approve...
 
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Yours truly,

Axis
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7. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 13:48 Megalodon
 
I wouldn't deign to listen to anything you had to say, you've already proven yourself to be supremely ignorant on this subject. Nice gay joke, you're a homophobe in addition to an idiot yer pappa must be proud.

We're all done here, you are dismissed.
 
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6. removed Aug 14, 2015, 13:37 Axis
 
* REMOVED *
This comment was deleted on Aug 14, 2015, 14:30.
 
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Yours truly,

Axis
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5. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 13:17 Megalodon
 
Axis wrote on Aug 14, 2015, 12:21:
Offsite backup solutions are the most important, it's called offsite storage, not online. And you never keep your pc on with remote software running and accessible unless you are a total idiot. And ya, may as well make your password "password". Also there's some misc ads running that give even more information, you should read more, click it all!

I deal with inexperienced buffonery like yours all the time. Great for keeping noob techs employed until they get fired, terrible policies.

Says the bestbuy computer janitor who recommends installing Avast, doesn't know how to secure his own network for a simple VPN connection and who apparently hasn't heard of strong encryption for either purpose. For a home user online storage can be very economical and you can encrypt all of the data yourself using whatever protocol/strength you want and just retain the the private key. It should never be relied on by itself but its a very viable piece of a proper backup strategy and you can secure your data within reason. For someone backing up personal photographs it doesn't exactly have to be mission critical security either. It can be much more economical and reliable than offsite storage, particularly for home users where they often can't be trusted to do those things consistently. If a foreign government really wants your Hootie and the Blowfish MP3s and 10 year old vacation photos that badly after taking a decade to break the encryption then nothing else was going to stop them anyway. They could just as easily break down your door, grab your computer and steal your offsite backups, in fact arguably that would be easier than breaking strong encryption stored at a corporation who will have its own security.

Backups should ideally be versioned but for home users, fuck it:

- incremental backups performed with bitrot full rotations every 10 backups, assuming no ECC memory
- 1x offsite backup that should be not solely relied on due to potential media defects, bitrot and fire/theft/flood/negligence
- 1x heavily encrypted online backup, user should retain private key somewhere secure
- 1x system image for enthusiasts who want convenience in case of hardware failure
- Backups are useless without restoration tests as many home users discover to their horror later on

Problem is no real home user is going to do all that. They will just do whatever Time Machine or random shitty Windows app they're using demands which is probably fine for most users anyway who only care that they don't lose photos in a crash.

If it was up to me everyone would be using ZFS on real NAS hardware and backing up to using some form of the above but I would settle for a bunch of people using Crashplan reliably.
 
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4. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 12:43  Burrito of Peace 
 
I have to agree with Axis that some of the "advice" in the article is pretty terrible.

The one that bothers me the most is "backup your data online". Sure, you could do that and expose your data to breaches, data mining, or just straight up internal snooping and internal theft. "B...b...but their EULA totally says that they won't look at my sutff!" Yeah, and I have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell you really cheap, too. Also, if you read that EULA carefully (and you probably didn't) you'll notice about six whole sections dedicated to telling you how you indemnify them against any damages as a result of any of the above actions.

If you don't outright own the device or service that your data is stored on, you don't control it and you are willingly trading your privacy for convenience. In my book, that makes you more than stupid, that makes you an idiot.

In addition, we need to start teaching users the principle of least privilege. It blows my mind that twenty years later, we're still letting Windows users run as administrators full time. You don't need administrative rights for every second that you're using a computer. In fact, you should have as little access as possible; only that which is necessary for you to complete your task. Is someone really going to try to make the argument that they need access to policy editing and disk management just to play The Witcher 3?
 
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3. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 12:21 Axis
 
descender wrote on Aug 14, 2015, 10:53:
None of the recommended software contains any malware. They explain why a "better password" is irrelevant in today's world. They address how off-site backup solutions are pretty important unless you have a fetish for rummaging through ash and debris for melted USB sticks.

Confused

Every one your points are directly addressed in detail in the sub-articles, you should read more... your "advice" is pretty inaccurate and uninformed. Yeah, keeping everything offline and disconnected is "more secure" in the moment, but so is leaving your car in your driveway and walking to work. Sometimes you do actually need to drive the thing!

Offsite backup solutions are the most important, it's called offsite storage, not online. And you never keep your pc on with remote software running and accessible unless you are a total idiot. And ya, may as well make your password "password". Also there's some misc ads running that give even more information, you should read more, click it all!

I deal with inexperienced buffonery like yours all the time. Great for keeping noob techs employed until they get fired, terrible policies.
 
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Yours truly,

Axis
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2. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 10:53 descender
 
None of the recommended software contains any malware. They explain why a "better password" is irrelevant in today's world. They address how off-site backup solutions are pretty important unless you have a fetish for rummaging through ash and debris for melted USB sticks.

Confused

Every one your points are directly addressed in detail in the sub-articles, you should read more... your "advice" is pretty inaccurate and uninformed. Yeah, keeping everything offline and disconnected is "more secure" in the moment, but so is leaving your car in your driveway and walking to work. Sometimes you do actually need to drive the thing!

This comment was edited on Aug 14, 2015, 10:59.
 
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1. Re: Morning Tech Bits Aug 14, 2015, 10:00 Axis
 
Top 10 Simple Things Every Computer User Should Know How to Do.
What a terrible article.

#1 make a less obvious password.
#2 Run Avast.
#3 backup just the files you need locally onto a usb stick, never remotely.
#4 Ignore the above article.

No computer user should be running 24/7 and sharing files via remote apps. Also, people get viruses way more often by installing malware that proclaim they'll "clean up your pc". I could go on, but average users should ignore that article immediately.
 
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Yours truly,

Axis
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