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25.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Jan 4, 2015, 13:01
Ant
 
25.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Jan 4, 2015, 13:01
Jan 4, 2015, 13:01
 Ant
 
I can't even fix stuff due to my disabilities. God won't let me RMA my defected body.
Ant's Quality Foraged Links (http://aqfl.net) & The Ant Farm (http://antfarm.ma.cx / http://antfarm.home.dhs.org).
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24.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Dec 30, 2014, 17:06
24.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Dec 30, 2014, 17:06
Dec 30, 2014, 17:06
 
HorrorScope wrote on Dec 30, 2014, 11:48:
The parental generation of this professor said the same things about the professors generation. You'd think a teacher would see the revolving use of words like "kids these days", they've said it since the dawn of time. Lets get it together people. And if it is "kids today" who is leading and teaching them... yes... "Adults these days".

Kids these days can't even make their own soap out of the rendered fat from the pig they slaughtered earlier in the morning.
23.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Dec 30, 2014, 11:48
23.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Dec 30, 2014, 11:48
Dec 30, 2014, 11:48
 
The parental generation of this professor said the same things about the professors generation. You'd think a teacher would see the revolving use of words like "kids these days", they've said it since the dawn of time. Lets get it together people. And if it is "kids today" who is leading and teaching them... yes... "Adults these days".
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22.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Dec 30, 2014, 11:24
22.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Dec 30, 2014, 11:24
Dec 30, 2014, 11:24
 
I disagree that cars aren't as well built. They're built to survive crashes. The issues they usually end up having now are electronic/computer ones on systems older cars didn't even have.

Other things? You can either pay much more and get metal parts, or pay less and get plastic parts. People opt to pay less. People get plastic parts. It is somewhat self fulfilling. We all hate airlines that cram us in and charge for everything, but when people go to book flights they usually sort by price then pick the ones with the time they want. If an airline started being "all inclusive," it would cost more and no one would fly it.
21.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Dec 30, 2014, 05:34
21.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Dec 30, 2014, 05:34
Dec 30, 2014, 05:34
 
PropheT wrote on Dec 30, 2014, 01:12:
I wonder how much of it is that a younger generation isn't able to fix things, or just can't because shit's not designed for it anymore
It's mostly the latter, I feel. This generation has more engineers and scientists than ever before (to the point where we have too many at times), so it's not a lack of skill or interest.

However we have made a conscientious trade-off between repairability and size, with an emphasis on the latter. And for good reason: we now have powerful computers that fit into our pockets, laptops less than an inch thick with high-DPI displays that run all day, and heaps of other gadgets that a generation ago would have been works of fiction. All of this progress comes from integration and building methods such as surface mounting components and gluing together parts milled to incredibly tight tolerances.

To have repairability like "the good old days" would require building devices like those days - (relatively) large boxes that use discrete components spaced in such a manner to allow easy access. And even then that doesn't get around the labor costs. When the material and assembly costs are so cheap, the labor to repair devices is much less attractive.
20.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Dec 30, 2014, 05:10
20.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Dec 30, 2014, 05:10
Dec 30, 2014, 05:10
 
D_K_night wrote on Dec 30, 2014, 04:23:
uh huh, so you redid a portion of the G11 circuit board with nothing but wires and duct tape. And you were able to simply eyeball the PCB and see all the traces. Right, sounds like a board from the early 1990's if you can just oh, look at it and see all traces.

"piss easy" so we should be able to hand this to a 10-year girl and order her to figure it out and fix it. Right man. Assuming your story is even true, just reading what you did is just total amateur hour, the way you approached it. Don't quit your day job.


The G11 has LED lights not on the main PCB, but on LED+micro-res only pcb's (3 with 3 LED's, and 1 with 2 LED's) that slide out easily and the cable (which goes around the entire rim of the G11) is a standard 2 or 3 pin power connector like for fans any other pc equipment, and I redid nothing. I threw the old led's, resistors and the entire LED pcb assembly in the trash. 2 LED's or their transistors were broken and there was no way to remove them and replace all others because there is no way to remove micro resistors with normal soldering equipment (not to mention I need other resistors anyway).

I dunno what you think I did, but I literally did the idiot proof "how to solder together a long string of LED lights with cable" which even a 10 year old girl could do. And then I put them where the LED pcb was and ducttaped it to the fiberglass pane that serves as light diffuser and called it a day. Result: White glow G11 for less than 3$

And whatever you may think, that fixed my flickering blue LED's and it was easy and cheap The old PCB assembly where the LED's were on was impossible to salvage with the soldering equipment I have. And I don't spend 200$ on hardware to replace LED's and resistors that barely cost 2$.
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19.
 
No subject
Dec 30, 2014, 04:23
19.
No subject Dec 30, 2014, 04:23
Dec 30, 2014, 04:23
 
uh huh, so you redid a portion of the G11 circuit board with nothing but wires and duct tape. And you were able to simply eyeball the PCB and see all the traces. Right, sounds like a board from the early 1990's if you can just oh, look at it and see all traces.

"piss easy" so we should be able to hand this to a 10-year girl and order her to figure it out and fix it. Right man. Assuming your story is even true, just reading what you did is just total amateur hour, the way you approached it. Don't quit your day job.

eRe4s3r wrote on Dec 30, 2014, 03:30:
Well, I replaced my Logitech G11 LED circuit board and put my own LED build in (white led's with stronger resistors so it isn't nuclear doom bright) had to recreate the entire fucking thing because the 4 circuit boards with LEDs they used had copper layers that instantly vaporized when I tried to remove the old LED welds. So had to create my own "grunge" LED rig with you know.. cables and duct-tape.

I think anyone who knows how to use google could do that though. This kind of stuff is piss easy and you need zero education for it, just calculator, the various electrical conversions and a LED calculator (since with 11 LED's on a 5V usb circuit things can become a bit difficult resistor wise ,p).

So I don't think what the article says is true. But one thing is true, I didn't learn how to weld in school, one of my (older than me) friends showed me how it works.

Ps.: not sure that is called "welding" I dunno the correct English word for it.
18.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Dec 30, 2014, 04:18
18.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Dec 30, 2014, 04:18
Dec 30, 2014, 04:18
 
eRe4s3r wrote on Dec 30, 2014, 03:30:
Ps.: not sure that is called "welding" I dunno the correct English word for it.

"Soldering" would be the correct word to use here. (I too, like soldering)
And I agree with a lot that's been written so far.

It's actually an interesting topic, since I think a lot of the younger people get quite good about fixing larger mechanical components or doing plastering around the house, but as soon as something electronic goes wrong they dump it and buy a new one.

At the same time I think it's partially related to the need to tinker and the problem is that the "older" generation didn't have all the fun stuff so easily available and had to create a lot of thinks themselves.
All the "younger" gen would need is a smartphone and Google play or apple store to find something to do, so they are more likely to skip the part where you go around the house/great outdoors and actually have the create your own entertainment.

I'm generalizing a lot here of course for the sake of argument since I'm sure there are plenty of exceptions and it's one of those topics which each previous generation can talk about the new one.)

Personally, I had to start with fixing and creating my "fun", because I couldn't just get a new one so I think it gave a good starting platform. Almost everything is self taught due to whatever needs I had at the time and I suppose the "due it yourself" mentality is a great way to also challenge yourself.
I really like building stuff or having some kind of a project at hand, even if it's just about fixing the leaky toilet, changing brake pads on the car or soldering some broken contacts. Eventually it carries over to making a custom built focus rail (photo stuff) out of a stepper motor you found from a broken DVD-Rom other random parts.

So I think it's probably best if the "older" generation just tries to show or inspire the "younger" generation to tinker around a bit more and not get lost between all of those pre-built gadgets that are so easy to purchase these days.
17.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Dec 30, 2014, 03:30
17.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Dec 30, 2014, 03:30
Dec 30, 2014, 03:30
 
Well, I replaced my Logitech G11 LED circuit board and put my own LED build in (white led's with stronger resistors so it isn't nuclear doom bright) had to recreate the entire fucking thing because the 4 circuit boards with LEDs they used had copper layers that instantly vaporized when I tried to remove the old LED welds. So had to create my own "grunge" LED rig with you know.. cables and duct-tape.

I think anyone who knows how to use google could do that though. This kind of stuff is piss easy and you need zero education for it, just calculator, the various electrical conversions and a LED calculator (since with 11 LED's on a 5V usb circuit things can become a bit difficult resistor wise ,p).

So I don't think what the article says is true. But one thing is true, I didn't learn how to weld in school, one of my (older than me) friends showed me how it works.

Ps.: not sure that is called "welding" I dunno the correct English word for it.
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16.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Dec 30, 2014, 03:16
16.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Dec 30, 2014, 03:16
Dec 30, 2014, 03:16
 
I demand that you call me by my pronoun

If you don't I will get REALLY MAD AND OFFENDED
15.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Dec 30, 2014, 02:59
15.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Dec 30, 2014, 02:59
Dec 30, 2014, 02:59
 
PropheT wrote on Dec 30, 2014, 01:12:
Veterator wrote on Dec 30, 2014, 00:01:
A lot of things are simply too expensive to fix.

That's sadly the truth. I can fix practically anything I get my hands on provided I have the parts, but more often than not it's either not worth it or the parts aren't available.

The dishwasher was a good example, since I have a dead one right now that I could probably fix but can't get parts for (it's not that old, either). My furnace needed work at the beginning of winter, but I couldn't fix that because if I did the power company wouldn't service it anymore... I wound up fixing that one anyway since it was an electrical issue, and they would have just replaced everything.

I wonder how much of it is that a younger generation isn't able to fix things, or just can't because shit's not designed for it anymore or has so many warranty/legal hoops that you can't get parts or service done even if you did crack it open.

People also forget how our consumer society is built. Things are not built to last or get repaired anymore. Look at cars. Cars are nowhere as solidly or well built as they used to be. That is on purpose. Our economy is built on spending cash on useless shit that is supposed to break down and die, so we can buy new useless shit.

Most kids these days cant think without turning on their cell phone or PC, so its no wonder that they cant spell let alone fix shit. But thats ok, they are not supposed to.
I have a nifty blue line!
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14.
 
Re: Gender Assumptions
Dec 30, 2014, 02:57
14.
Re: Gender Assumptions Dec 30, 2014, 02:57
Dec 30, 2014, 02:57
 
cento wrote on Dec 29, 2014, 22:33:
Cutter wrote on Dec 29, 2014, 22:10:
It's a fair assumption because most of them are. Just like most chefs are men. There's noting sexist in it as it's a safe assumption and no one is saying women are incapable of being professors so stick that SJW BS up your ass or go be offended with the rest of the clowns on a site like Polygon.


And it is still clear you comment on articles without actually reading them.

Not that that is surprising.

Hahahha. Busted!
I have a nifty blue line!
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13.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Dec 30, 2014, 01:12
13.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Dec 30, 2014, 01:12
Dec 30, 2014, 01:12
 
Veterator wrote on Dec 30, 2014, 00:01:
A lot of things are simply too expensive to fix.

That's sadly the truth. I can fix practically anything I get my hands on provided I have the parts, but more often than not it's either not worth it or the parts aren't available.

The dishwasher was a good example, since I have a dead one right now that I could probably fix but can't get parts for (it's not that old, either). My furnace needed work at the beginning of winter, but I couldn't fix that because if I did the power company wouldn't service it anymore... I wound up fixing that one anyway since it was an electrical issue, and they would have just replaced everything.

I wonder how much of it is that a younger generation isn't able to fix things, or just can't because shit's not designed for it anymore or has so many warranty/legal hoops that you can't get parts or service done even if you did crack it open.
12.
 
Re: Evening Tech Bits
Dec 30, 2014, 00:01
12.
Re: Evening Tech Bits Dec 30, 2014, 00:01
Dec 30, 2014, 00:01
 
A lot of things are simply too expensive to fix. Dish Washer was acting up, GUESSING at what was wrong with it...you could put 100-200 bucks into it and MAYBE fix it. But it will probably break another part or have another issue in another year or two and cost more to fix.

Even a lot of the "professionals" guess and go for the most likely repairs........even on cars.

Phones/tablets/etc....assuming you can get the device open without breaking the little plastic clips. A lot of MFGs glue stuff down and make it a real pain to attempt repairs, and require soldering in the case of batteries often times.

My parents have a almost 30 YO fridge of my grandmothers......that works fine. Doesn't have any bells and whistles like most fridges they sell now, but it still works. In the meantime, they've had one fridge die after 10-12 years and the replacement had poor design issues within months of purchase that last to this day. You could keep fixing it, but it'll just keep breaking because it's a dumb design. The ice making pushes the ice up hill, and the ice binds and causes the pieces in the mechanisms to strip and break. To give the freezer an extra little bit of room. You'd think companies making fridges and appliances for going on 40-50 years might have a little inkling of what might be a design issue by now.


Oh and microwaves, those bastards seem to be a crap shoot at this point. Got the grandmothers ancient microwave, new ones might last 2-5 years before something important in em dies....and they can be rather dangerous to futz with to save 100-200 bucks.
11.
 
Re: Gender Assumptions
Dec 29, 2014, 23:54
11.
Re: Gender Assumptions Dec 29, 2014, 23:54
Dec 29, 2014, 23:54
 
Cutter wrote on Dec 29, 2014, 22:10:
It's a fair assumption because most of them are. Just like most chefs are men.

Relevant graph

The gender disparity for professors (subject instructors) is actually almost nil. Cooks are 59% male, though.
10.
 
Re: Gender Assumptions
Dec 29, 2014, 23:44
10.
Re: Gender Assumptions Dec 29, 2014, 23:44
Dec 29, 2014, 23:44
 
Cutter wrote on Dec 29, 2014, 22:10:
cento wrote on Dec 29, 2014, 21:53:
SHE/HER

The professor is a woman. It strikes me as interesting that the automatic assumption I have seen here and on other pages linking to the story, commenters appeared to be commenting without having read more than the headline and make an automatic assumption that someone with the title of "professor" would by default be male...

It's a fair assumption because most of them are. Just like most chefs are men. There's noting sexist in it as it's a safe assumption and no one is saying women are incapable of being professors so stick that SJW BS up your ass or go be offended with the rest of the clowns on a site like Polygon.


Way to miss the point Cutter. No surprise really. Maybe start reading articles before you post your usual bullshit.
9.
 
Re: Gender Assumptions
Dec 29, 2014, 23:44
9.
Re: Gender Assumptions Dec 29, 2014, 23:44
Dec 29, 2014, 23:44
 
cento wrote on Dec 29, 2014, 21:53:
SHE/HER

The professor is a woman. It strikes me as interesting that the automatic assumption I have seen here and on other pages linking to the story, commenters appeared to be commenting without having read more than the headline and make an automatic assumption that someone with the title of "professor" would by default be male...

Hrm, I even read the article and flew right over "Danielle" and a couple "she"'s... of course I have been up for like 30 hours.
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8.
 
Re: Gender Assumptions
Dec 29, 2014, 23:44
8.
Re: Gender Assumptions Dec 29, 2014, 23:44
Dec 29, 2014, 23:44
 
It's also fair to assume the professor is male because typically it's old men who complain about things like this.
Huh? I'm sorry, I was thinking about cake.
7.
 
Re: Gender Assumptions
Dec 29, 2014, 22:33
7.
Re: Gender Assumptions Dec 29, 2014, 22:33
Dec 29, 2014, 22:33
 
Cutter wrote on Dec 29, 2014, 22:10:
It's a fair assumption because most of them are. Just like most chefs are men. There's noting sexist in it as it's a safe assumption and no one is saying women are incapable of being professors so stick that SJW BS up your ass or go be offended with the rest of the clowns on a site like Polygon.


And it is still clear you comment on articles without actually reading them.

Not that that is surprising.
6.
 
Re: Gender Assumptions
Dec 29, 2014, 22:10
6.
Re: Gender Assumptions Dec 29, 2014, 22:10
Dec 29, 2014, 22:10
 
cento wrote on Dec 29, 2014, 21:53:
SHE/HER

The professor is a woman. It strikes me as interesting that the automatic assumption I have seen here and on other pages linking to the story, commenters appeared to be commenting without having read more than the headline and make an automatic assumption that someone with the title of "professor" would by default be male...

It's a fair assumption because most of them are. Just like most chefs are men. There's noting sexist in it as it's a safe assumption and no one is saying women are incapable of being professors so stick that SJW BS up your ass or go be offended with the rest of the clowns on a site like Polygon.

"You have enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life."
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25 Replies. 2 pages. Viewing page 1.
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