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14.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 4, 2014, 14:42
14.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 4, 2014, 14:42
May 4, 2014, 14:42
 
DarkCntry wrote on May 3, 2014, 20:41:
Then they could easily preface their live-tweet with the same thing that COPS does at the close of their show about everyone show is innocent until proven otherwise in a court-of-law.

That said, it doesn't really matter as they've laid out the general idea of the sting. Follow the ads to the operations and the clients.

Of course, we could all get into the theories that this police department is corrupt and would intentionally setup people...but doing so in such a public manner would probably be one of the worst decisions in the history of man.


Has nothing to do with corruption. It has to do with what basically amounts to publicly shaming the guy before they have been proven guilty. Even a hint of improper behavior for MANY jobs can end up with you being unemployed.

Already put up my example of people getting busted improperly for it. It's a stigma related issue rather than anything. You can go online in most places and look up this information for people, so the information is there in the normal processing. They are going above and beyond to make an example.
13.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 4, 2014, 02:28
13.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 4, 2014, 02:28
May 4, 2014, 02:28
 
Didn't Obama order the CDC to investigate, once and for all, the whole "violent videogames cause kids to turn into rampaging killers" horseshit?

I guess the CDC runs on Valve Time? How fucking long does that take, CDC?

Or was this more Presidential "I say I'm gonna do something, but heh, I'm really not," claptrap?
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12.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 3, 2014, 20:41
12.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 3, 2014, 20:41
May 3, 2014, 20:41
 
Veterator wrote on May 3, 2014, 17:55:
I guess I'd have to say one is TV where they've set the guy up in such a way to make it clear that he knew he what he was showing up for.

And the other is posting suspect photos AND information with an unknown level of setup/confirmation. If they prosecute them all successfully it's likely it was done right, but like I said..if one gets away they can sue.

They could sue the TV show too if they didn't actually do what they were being accused of and aired. But they could have just as easily waited until after sentencing to air the episodes to cover their ass, don't really care enough to look it up.

These guys are LIVE TWEETING....so yeah.

Then they could easily preface their live-tweet with the same thing that COPS does at the close of their show about everyone show is innocent until proven otherwise in a court-of-law.

That said, it doesn't really matter as they've laid out the general idea of the sting. Follow the ads to the operations and the clients.

Of course, we could all get into the theories that this police department is corrupt and would intentionally setup people...but doing so in such a public manner would probably be one of the worst decisions in the history of man.

Kosumo wrote on May 3, 2014, 16:50:
Prostitution is totally legal in many places. (because they are consenting adults)

Just like drug use.

You know that whats legal and whats not is a man made concept that changes over time.

Do you believe you should be able to tell people what they can and cant do when they are in agreement?

Are you really going to get into a philosophical debate about laws? In the state that this takes place, prostitution is not a legal activity, pretty clear to me.
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11.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 3, 2014, 17:55
11.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 3, 2014, 17:55
May 3, 2014, 17:55
 
DarkCntry wrote on May 3, 2014, 03:08:
Veterator wrote on May 3, 2014, 03:01:
From the Prostitute article: Suspect photos and information will be tweeted.

I predict that will backfire on them quite horribly if just one fails to be prosecuted successfully.

Used to be a guy around this area that if approached by someone would record the conversation with a pocket recorder he kept in his pocket. One day an under cover cop walks up, and he starts to record it. She busts him for soliciting her, in fact she busts a significant number of dudes in a short period of time like 25-50 in a day. Gets into court, it's his turn to go up, he plays his recording and the judge asks who else was busted by that particular cop and has to let them all go due to his recording showing that he never once indicated he was interested. He just said things like "uh huh" or "I see" to keep her talking knowing something was fishy. Cop got yelled at by the judge for awhile and no idea if anything happened beyond that.

But if you put those guys pictures and info up on twitter today with something like that happening...you think none would sue for defamation/etc. Just hinting that someone could have done something nowadays could end a career, especially if they deal with elderly or children.

Again, how is this any different than what To Catch a Predator does, except the nicety of TV post-production and lead-in times?

I guess I'd have to say one is TV where they've set the guy up in such a way to make it clear that he knew he what he was showing up for.

And the other is posting suspect photos AND information with an unknown level of setup/confirmation. If they prosecute them all successfully it's likely it was done right, but like I said..if one gets away they can sue.

They could sue the TV show too if they didn't actually do what they were being accused of and aired. But they could have just as easily waited until after sentencing to air the episodes to cover their ass, don't really care enough to look it up.

These guys are LIVE TWEETING....so yeah.
10.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 3, 2014, 16:50
10.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 3, 2014, 16:50
May 3, 2014, 16:50
 
Prostitution is totally legal in many places. (because they are consenting adults)

Just like drug use.

You know that whats legal and whats not is a man made concept that changes over time.

Do you believe you should be able to tell people what they can and cant do when they are in agreement?
9.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 3, 2014, 13:39
9.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 3, 2014, 13:39
May 3, 2014, 13:39
 
Meanwhile, half the population of my shit state of Connecticut wants to leave. Anybody surprised?
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8.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 3, 2014, 13:27
8.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 3, 2014, 13:27
May 3, 2014, 13:27
 
Julio wrote on May 3, 2014, 11:00:
DarkCntry wrote on May 3, 2014, 03:08:
Again, how is this any different than what To Catch a Predator does, except the nicety of TV post-production and lead-in times?

One's catching pedos, and one is catching consenting adults.

Funny, I didn't know that consenting adults makes prostitution legal...
Avatar 24330
7.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 3, 2014, 11:00
7.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 3, 2014, 11:00
May 3, 2014, 11:00
 
DarkCntry wrote on May 3, 2014, 03:08:
Again, how is this any different than what To Catch a Predator does, except the nicety of TV post-production and lead-in times?

One's catching pedos, and one is catching consenting adults.
6.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 3, 2014, 03:08
6.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 3, 2014, 03:08
May 3, 2014, 03:08
 
Veterator wrote on May 3, 2014, 03:01:
From the Prostitute article: Suspect photos and information will be tweeted.

I predict that will backfire on them quite horribly if just one fails to be prosecuted successfully.

Used to be a guy around this area that if approached by someone would record the conversation with a pocket recorder he kept in his pocket. One day an under cover cop walks up, and he starts to record it. She busts him for soliciting her, in fact she busts a significant number of dudes in a short period of time like 25-50 in a day. Gets into court, it's his turn to go up, he plays his recording and the judge asks who else was busted by that particular cop and has to let them all go due to his recording showing that he never once indicated he was interested. He just said things like "uh huh" or "I see" to keep her talking knowing something was fishy. Cop got yelled at by the judge for awhile and no idea if anything happened beyond that.

But if you put those guys pictures and info up on twitter today with something like that happening...you think none would sue for defamation/etc. Just hinting that someone could have done something nowadays could end a career, especially if they deal with elderly or children.

Again, how is this any different than what To Catch a Predator does, except the nicety of TV post-production and lead-in times?
Avatar 24330
5.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 3, 2014, 03:01
5.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 3, 2014, 03:01
May 3, 2014, 03:01
 
From the Prostitute article: Suspect photos and information will be tweeted.

I predict that will backfire on them quite horribly if just one fails to be prosecuted successfully.

Used to be a guy around this area that if approached by someone would record the conversation with a pocket recorder he kept in his pocket. One day an under cover cop walks up, and he starts to record it. She busts him for soliciting her, in fact she busts a significant number of dudes in a short period of time like 25-50 in a day. Gets into court, it's his turn to go up, he plays his recording and the judge asks who else was busted by that particular cop and has to let them all go due to his recording showing that he never once indicated he was interested. He just said things like "uh huh" or "I see" to keep her talking knowing something was fishy. Cop got yelled at by the judge for awhile and no idea if anything happened beyond that.

But if you put those guys pictures and info up on twitter today with something like that happening...you think none would sue for defamation/etc. Just hinting that someone could have done something nowadays could end a career, especially if they deal with elderly or children.
4.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 2, 2014, 22:24
4.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 2, 2014, 22:24
May 2, 2014, 22:24
 
I'd love to know of the "countless studies" she refers to. As someone with more than a passing interest in the topic, I've yet to see a single study that proves violent media causes violent long-term behavior. Of the few that find any correlation at all (and it's tenuous), they've only found a link between short term aggression immediately after playing a game, meaning the player may be "hyped up" for a short period, much like any athlete that just participated in any sporting event.

Funny, politicians seem to want to legislate just about anything related to gun violence except the "gun" part (and I'm not advocating that, but these red herrings of rap music, video games, movies is simply nonsense).
3.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 2, 2014, 19:38
3.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 2, 2014, 19:38
May 2, 2014, 19:38
 
Connecticut Lawmaker Calls For Taxes, Warning Labels On M-Rated Games.

Okay,

A. It's the competitive aspects of video games that increases the aggression, not the violence. From the article:
Ph.D candidate Paul Adachi, who co-authored an upcoming paper in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, “Demolishing the Competition: The Longitudinal Link Between Competitive Video Games, Competitive Gambling, and Aggression,” offers more proof that aggressive behavior doesn’t stem from videogames: It stems from competition.

B. Millions of people play hundreds of hours of violent games per year. Yet the murder rate in the USA has dropped precipitously since Wolfenstein 3D was first introduced to the world in 1992. I could just as easily correlate that violent video games REDUCE homicides.

C. This is CT, so they're responding to Sandy Hook. Adam Lanza was mentally ill. Want to prevent a Sandy Hook, or a Gabrielle Giffords, or a Virginia Tech? Increase awareness and treatment of mental health issues. Right now, I can break my arm, and my treatement is 100% covered, but if I want to see a psychologist, I have to pay half, which adds up pretty quickly. I think it's the same for most insurance policies. And of course, those with mental illness are usually the least able to pay since their illness likely has reduced or eliminated their earning potential.

D. This will never happen, but if you want to reduce gun crime you reduce the guns.
"Even after you've had the COVID-19 vaccine, you still need to wash hands, watch distance and wear a mask because you can still transmit the virus even though you're not going to get sick." - NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins
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2.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 2, 2014, 19:12
2.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 2, 2014, 19:12
May 2, 2014, 19:12
 
DarkCntry wrote on May 2, 2014, 18:54:
PGPD to Live Tweet Prostitution Sting.

Everyone enjoyed the idea when Chris Hanson decided to do similar things to pedophiles...so what makes this really any different except cutting out the middleman of television?

This story definitely deserves a follow up.
"Even after you've had the COVID-19 vaccine, you still need to wash hands, watch distance and wear a mask because you can still transmit the virus even though you're not going to get sick." - NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins
Avatar 22024
1.
 
Re: Evening Legal Briefs
May 2, 2014, 18:54
1.
Re: Evening Legal Briefs May 2, 2014, 18:54
May 2, 2014, 18:54
 
PGPD to Live Tweet Prostitution Sting.

Everyone enjoyed the idea when Chris Hanson decided to do similar things to pedophiles...so what makes this really any different except cutting out the middleman of television?
Avatar 24330
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