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16.
 
Re: Into the Black
Dec 12, 2013, 14:39
16.
Re: Into the Black Dec 12, 2013, 14:39
Dec 12, 2013, 14:39
 
Julio wrote on Dec 12, 2013, 04:57:

Couldn't agree more, I would love for the CBC to lose all public funding. Then they could be supported by the left who they represent. The CBC plays no viable purpose except for lousy programing and a waste of tax payer dollars.
Well they're going to have to do something in the waste and cutting section now that they don't have hockey as a money making fallback. Who knows? Maybe it'll get back to it's original mandate of providing news and information for canadians, instead of giving opinions as news, and trying to shape public policy.
--
"For every human problem,
there is a neat, simple solution;
and it is always wrong."
--H.L. Mencken
15.
 
Re: Into the Black
Dec 12, 2013, 04:57
15.
Re: Into the Black Dec 12, 2013, 04:57
Dec 12, 2013, 04:57
 
Mashiki Amiketo wrote on Dec 12, 2013, 02:55:
And calling the CBC "barely left of centre" is joke. It's not as far left of rable, but it's sure not 'barely left of centre' and that's right from their own mouths.

Couldn't agree more, I would love for the CBC to lose all public funding. Then they could be supported by the left who they represent. The CBC plays no viable purpose except for lousy programing and a waste of tax payer dollars.
14.
 
Re: Into the Black
Dec 12, 2013, 02:55
14.
Re: Into the Black Dec 12, 2013, 02:55
Dec 12, 2013, 02:55
 
NegaDeath wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 21:41:

The G20 spying happened during the current gov. The domestic warrantless "anti-child predators" spying bill that enraged the population was during the current gov. The same bill that has now been repackaged as as the "anti-cyber bullying" bill is during the current gov. As always it's a matter of degrees.

At worst the CBC is barely left of center. To someone far to the right even the center is too far to the left.
Hate to be a wet blanket, but you can go back through every government and find "spying" is pretty much a national past time in Canada. In fact it got so bad at one point that the mandate was ripped away from the RCMP, CSIS was created, and an entire civilian oversight board was created to make sure it didn't happen again.

And you can stop with the FUD anytime you want, there was no "warrentless spying" rather it was exigent circumstances, which was earlier struck down by the SCC regarding phone and emails anyway. As a fun thing, even if that bill did pass--I highly doubt it will, it'll be struck down by the SCC for the same reason. The courts determined that exigent circumstances is no longer a valid reason for an invasion of rights.

And calling the CBC "barely left of centre" is joke. It's not as far left of rable, but it's sure not 'barely left of centre' and that's right from their own mouths.
--
"For every human problem,
there is a neat, simple solution;
and it is always wrong."
--H.L. Mencken
13.
 
Re: Into the Black
Dec 11, 2013, 21:41
13.
Re: Into the Black Dec 11, 2013, 21:41
Dec 11, 2013, 21:41
 
Julio wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 17:19:
He's pointing out that the article says that the cooperative spying has been happening for 60 years now. So it's not the current government who set this up. And who was prime minister 60 years ago ish...Louis St Laurent, a Liberal.

Of course the CBC is not exactly a reputable source of information given it's leftwards bias.

The G20 spying happened during the current gov. The domestic warrantless "anti-child predators" spying bill that enraged the population was during the current gov. The same bill that has now been repackaged as as the "anti-cyber bullying" bill is during the current gov. As always it's a matter of degrees.

At worst the CBC is barely left of center. To someone far to the right even the center is too far to the left.
Avatar 57352
12.
 
Re: Changing your passwords
Dec 11, 2013, 20:34
12.
Re: Changing your passwords Dec 11, 2013, 20:34
Dec 11, 2013, 20:34
 
Creston wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 15:48:
LesCaster wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 14:06:
Creston wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 13:40:
With the advent of programs that use a graphics card to brute force millions upon millions of passwords in an hour (thanks for writing those btw, assclowns!), passwords have become completely and utterly useless.

it's time to switch over to biometric-based security. Sure, it can still get hacked/stolen, but it's better than trying to come up with more and more ridiculous password complexities, all of which do nothing to stop that password from being 100% vulnerable.

Don't most properly implemented security systems lock a user out after some set number of failed login attempts? For example, if a site prevents a user from attempting to login for 3 minutes for every 5 failed tries, then the rate of blind tries gets reduced to 100/hr. Seems like that would be enough to thwart most brute force attempts.

Nobody tries to hack by just stumbling against the front door of a network anymore (if, in fact, anyone EVER did that.) They get to a poorly protected server and just crash download a massive amount of login info, then they do the brute force on their dedicated systems back home, and go back with the actual login info to get into the network proper. (or your credit card, or whatever.)

The whole "3 logins locks out your account" is like the password version of DRM. The only people it inconveniences are legitimate users.

Right so making really complex one's doesn't matter. People are just getting the answer, there is no guessing. Because if you don't have that, then you are at a point where you get so many attempts and then your locked out (If the system doesn't have that, then it's woeful). Since we know that isn't happening unless you are using the top 5 worst passwords to use. The whole issue is people are hacking DB's and stealing them outright.

So lets go with what you suggested Creston. It will still be the same issue know? It would be a bunch of data in a blob field that represents eye's for example. So you just hack the DB steal that and somehow hack that data into the camera fooling it and gaining access. Ehh...
Avatar 17232
11.
 
Re: Morning Safety Dance
Dec 11, 2013, 20:31
11.
Re: Morning Safety Dance Dec 11, 2013, 20:31
Dec 11, 2013, 20:31
 
Glad one person caught it. And the CBC is about as reputable as Pravda.
--
"For every human problem,
there is a neat, simple solution;
and it is always wrong."
--H.L. Mencken
10.
 
Re: Morning Safety Dance
Dec 11, 2013, 17:19
10.
Re: Morning Safety Dance Dec 11, 2013, 17:19
Dec 11, 2013, 17:19
 
Cutter wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 14:47:
It's not like Harper and co. wouldn't love that. And what the hell does Laurent have to do with the NSA? Uh nothing. This is the Harper Junta doing this so don't try to deflect.

He's pointing out that the article says that the cooperative spying has been happening for 60 years now. So it's not the current government who set this up. And who was prime minister 60 years ago ish...Louis St Laurent, a Liberal.

Of course the CBC is not exactly a reputable source of information given it's leftwards bias.
9.
 
Re: Morning Safety Dance
Dec 11, 2013, 17:16
9.
Re: Morning Safety Dance Dec 11, 2013, 17:16
Dec 11, 2013, 17:16
 
jdreyer wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 15:00:
NSA leaks blamed for Cisco’s falling sales overseas.

Don't blame the NSA. Blame yourself for not insisting on a warrant. Blame yourself for not pushing back to protect your customers' privacy.

Activists push back in AmeriKa are either imprisoned (like political prisoners Herman Wallace and Marilyn Buck, that were imprisoned for years, and released so ill they died days after their release) or labeled as potential terrorists.

Or you are blacklisted as a potential terrorist in AmeriKa for opposing surveillance, journalism, protesting anything, questioning war, etc.
Avatar 37119
8.
 
Re: Changing your passwords
Dec 11, 2013, 15:48
8.
Re: Changing your passwords Dec 11, 2013, 15:48
Dec 11, 2013, 15:48
 
LesCaster wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 14:06:
Creston wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 13:40:
With the advent of programs that use a graphics card to brute force millions upon millions of passwords in an hour (thanks for writing those btw, assclowns!), passwords have become completely and utterly useless.

it's time to switch over to biometric-based security. Sure, it can still get hacked/stolen, but it's better than trying to come up with more and more ridiculous password complexities, all of which do nothing to stop that password from being 100% vulnerable.

Don't most properly implemented security systems lock a user out after some set number of failed login attempts? For example, if a site prevents a user from attempting to login for 3 minutes for every 5 failed tries, then the rate of blind tries gets reduced to 100/hr. Seems like that would be enough to thwart most brute force attempts.

Nobody tries to hack by just stumbling against the front door of a network anymore (if, in fact, anyone EVER did that.) They get to a poorly protected server and just crash download a massive amount of login info, then they do the brute force on their dedicated systems back home, and go back with the actual login info to get into the network proper. (or your credit card, or whatever.)

The whole "3 logins locks out your account" is like the password version of DRM. The only people it inconveniences are legitimate users.
Avatar 15604
7.
 
Re: Morning Safety Dance
Dec 11, 2013, 15:00
7.
Re: Morning Safety Dance Dec 11, 2013, 15:00
Dec 11, 2013, 15:00
 
NSA leaks blamed for Cisco’s falling sales overseas.

Don't blame the NSA. Blame yourself for not insisting on a warrant. Blame yourself for not pushing back to protect your customers' privacy.
"Blizzard fucked up what should have been the easiest pile of free money ever." - NKD
Avatar 22024
6.
 
Re: Morning Safety Dance
Dec 11, 2013, 14:47
Cutter
 
6.
Re: Morning Safety Dance Dec 11, 2013, 14:47
Dec 11, 2013, 14:47
 Cutter
 
Mashiki Amiketo wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 10:44:
Cutter wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 09:31:
And the disdain for Canada by the Harper Junta just continues to mount.

Love the "current government of the day" bashing. Useful fact, this was started under Louis St. Laurent, and has continued to this day. Besides, if this was a Junta, you'd be shot in the streets already, and so would anyone else who disagrees.

It's not like Harper and co. wouldn't love that. And what the hell does Laurent have to do with the NSA? Uh nothing. This is the Harper Junta doing this so don't try to deflect.
"Whatever you say Stone Cold Steve Austin…I don't know why I just said that. Doesn't make a lot of sense, but gonna stand by it. Whatever you say Stone Cold Steve Austin! I'm owning it." - Rick Sanchez
Avatar 25394
5.
 
Re: Changing your passwords
Dec 11, 2013, 14:06
5.
Re: Changing your passwords Dec 11, 2013, 14:06
Dec 11, 2013, 14:06
 
Creston wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 13:40:
With the advent of programs that use a graphics card to brute force millions upon millions of passwords in an hour (thanks for writing those btw, assclowns!), passwords have become completely and utterly useless.

it's time to switch over to biometric-based security. Sure, it can still get hacked/stolen, but it's better than trying to come up with more and more ridiculous password complexities, all of which do nothing to stop that password from being 100% vulnerable.

Don't most properly implemented security systems lock a user out after some set number of failed login attempts? For example, if a site prevents a user from attempting to login for 3 minutes for every 5 failed tries, then the rate of blind tries gets reduced to 100/hr. Seems like that would be enough to thwart most brute force attempts.
I once prayed to god for a bike, but quickly found out he didnt work that way...so I stole a bike and prayed for his forgiveness.
4.
 
Changing your passwords
Dec 11, 2013, 13:40
4.
Changing your passwords Dec 11, 2013, 13:40
Dec 11, 2013, 13:40
 
With the advent of programs that use a graphics card to brute force millions upon millions of passwords in an hour (thanks for writing those btw, assclowns!), passwords have become completely and utterly useless.

it's time to switch over to biometric-based security. Sure, it can still get hacked/stolen, but it's better than trying to come up with more and more ridiculous password complexities, all of which do nothing to stop that password from being 100% vulnerable.
Avatar 15604
3.
 
Re: Morning Safety Dance
Dec 11, 2013, 12:54
3.
Re: Morning Safety Dance Dec 11, 2013, 12:54
Dec 11, 2013, 12:54
2.
 
Re: Morning Safety Dance
Dec 11, 2013, 10:44
2.
Re: Morning Safety Dance Dec 11, 2013, 10:44
Dec 11, 2013, 10:44
 
Cutter wrote on Dec 11, 2013, 09:31:
And the disdain for Canada by the Harper Junta just continues to mount.
Love the "current government of the day" bashing. Useful fact, this was started under Louis St. Laurent, and has continued to this day. Besides, if this was a Junta, you'd be shot in the streets already, and so would anyone else who disagrees.
--
"For every human problem,
there is a neat, simple solution;
and it is always wrong."
--H.L. Mencken
1.
 
Re: Morning Safety Dance
Dec 11, 2013, 09:31
Cutter
 
1.
Re: Morning Safety Dance Dec 11, 2013, 09:31
Dec 11, 2013, 09:31
 Cutter
 
And the disdain for Canada by the Harper Junta just continues to mount.
"Whatever you say Stone Cold Steve Austin…I don't know why I just said that. Doesn't make a lot of sense, but gonna stand by it. Whatever you say Stone Cold Steve Austin! I'm owning it." - Rick Sanchez
Avatar 25394
16 Replies. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
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