NVIDIA's Cloud Rendering

NVIDIA announces CloudLight, a cloud-based "system for amortizing indirect lighting in real-time rendering." They say this new framework "explores tradeoffs in different partitions of the global illumination workload between Cloud and local devices, with an eye to how available network and computational power influence design decisions and image quality." This video offers a look at what this means in case the following explanation isn't crystal clear:
We introduce CloudLight, a system for computing indirect lighting in the Cloud to support real-time rendering for interactive 3D applications on a user's local device. CloudLight maps the traditional graphics pipeline onto a distributed system. That differs from a single-machine renderer in three fundamental ways. First, the mapping introduces potential asymmetry between computational resources available at the Cloud and local device sides of the pipeline. Second, compared to a hardware memory bus, the network introduces relatively large latency and low bandwidth between certain pipeline stages. Third, for multi-user virtual environments, a Cloud solution can amortize expensive global illumination costs across users. Our new CloudLight framework explores tradeoffs in different partitions of the global illumination workload between Cloud and local devices, with an eye to how available network and computational power influence design decisions and image quality. We describe the tradeoffs and characteristics of mapping three known lighting algorithms to our system and demonstrate scaling for up to 50 simultaneous CloudLight users.

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Re: NVIDIA's Cloud Rendering
Jul 29, 2013, 14:14
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Re: NVIDIA's Cloud Rendering Jul 29, 2013, 14:14
Jul 29, 2013, 14:14
 
PHJF wrote on Jul 29, 2013, 12:12:
Great, when every asshole on the internet is sporting a $1000 graphics card like in this demo, this will be awesome.

LOL. Well, you know, distributed processing has been around a long time. We have Bitcoins now which is based on a similar concept (and was predicted by the NSA over 20 years ago). Obviously I don't want my SLI running 24-7 for other people because it costs a lot of money in terms of energy. Yet if you've ever downloaded P2P for a MMO or something, you see your connection is being used in kind. What you see here with Nvidia is more of them balancing your local devices, and devices you are interacting with (local/multi-user) with their more powerful cloud servers. What that might mean for people who want to put their computers to such use remains to be seen, but as I suggested the use of a home machine as a center/hub/server/owncloud could enter into that mix. It's more likely your mobile devices would be used that way during actual usage, though. As far as my grid suggestions go, that's different: ISP's already have issues with bandwidth usage, and sooner or later they will push for it as a solution. As I also stated, Google fiber has provisions in the TOS that already make me think that's 10, 20 years down the road...but yeah, I didn't necessarily mean PC's so much as tablets, phones, microcontrollers in smart devices, Chromecast/Roku/TV, etc.

This comment was edited on Jul 29, 2013, 14:21.
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