Quoteworthy - Paradox on DRM

"No one should have to purchase a product that they’re unable to install because of the DRM. There might be other reasons, like the compatibility isn’t correct, or whatever. But people who purchase a game should have just as easy a time as those who pirate the game, otherwise it’s a negative incentive to buy a legal copy. And I just can’t see why people are using DRM still. If you take something like Sony’s DRM, SecuROM -- it’s a waste of money," says Paradox CEO Fred Wester. "It will keep you protected for three days, it will create a lot of technical support, and it will not increase sales. And I know this for a fact, because we tried it eight years ago, and it never worked for us. Two major reasons: it costs money and it makes you lose money, and the other is that it’s so inconvenient to customers."
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Re: Quoteworthy - Paradox on DRM
Jan 25, 2012, 14:43
25.
Re: Quoteworthy - Paradox on DRM Jan 25, 2012, 14:43
Jan 25, 2012, 14:43
 
Wolfox wrote on Jan 25, 2012, 11:49:
baltar wrote on Jan 25, 2012, 11:02:
He's talking about how they never use DRM in the link and yet all their games have Steam DRM on it with region blocking. I call foul.

You should check your facts before crying foul.

All the games developed in-house (Europa Universalis, Hearts of Iron, Victoria, EU: Rome, Sengoku, etc) have been DRM-free since, well, ever. If they're sold on Steam, of course they'll use Steam - but if you buy it on retail or on Gamersgate, they have no DRM at all.

Most of the games published (but not developed) by Paradox were also released DRM-free. The AGEOD games have no DRM, Achtung Panzer had no DRM, and neither did Cities in Motion, Elven Legacy, Fort Zombie, Sword of the Stars, King Arthur, etc, etc, etc.

Now, some of their third-party (published) games do have DRM. Sword of the Stars 2, Magicka and Lead & Gold are Steam only (though the former seems to have no DRM, just using Steam as a distribution platform), the Mount & Blade series uses the developer DRM, Majesty 2 and East India Company used Impulse Goo. But that's pretty much it. I can't think of any other Paradox title that uses DRM in any form. Can you?

So, when you compare the list of DRM-free titles with that of DRM titles, what do you see? You see that Paradox doesn't use DRM, except when the developers require it. That's it.

So please, next time, check your facts.

Still calling foul.

First, The box has Paradox's logo on it, and I see it before I see the title when I launch the game. If this was being argued in a court of law, they would say "any reasonable person would assume Paradox had their hands in it." Regardless of the internal politics inside the company as to who's running what.

Secondly, If I was CEO of that company, I would say "DRM free or GTFO." none of this stupidity where they dev a game and some other publisher dictates a DRM on it especially when Paradox is easily capable of self publishing their own developed games.

Third, and this goes for everyone on the thread, these companies pull garbage such as run a bunch of their businesses overseas, hire developers in India, take advantage of tax laws outside of the USA. They are using globalization to their maximum effect, and yet they would put in artificial barriers to block customers that try to import their games so the rest of us can't do it? Does that sound right?

To be somewhat fair, I can understand them trying to block someone from the USA trying to buy the Russian version of said game for $10 instead of paying $50. What I don't understand is why block it for someone going to a more expensive country to buy the same game? Magicka sells for $10 ever since it was released in the USA. I bought it from the EU for $15 when I was there because I really REALLY hate DL games and the USA has it DL only.

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