Op Ed

guardian.co.uk - Clone Wars- is plagiarism killing creativity in the games industry? Thanks Ant via Boing Boing.
While finding out that a rival company has plagiarised your hard work may sting, there is little legal recourse for developers who believe their game idea has been appropriated. The issue is that video games are creative in both visual and aural terms, but also in purely functional terms, and the laws that govern these elements are fundamentally different.

Alex Chapman, a lawyer at Sheridan's specialising in games, says: "Generally speaking there is no copyright in a game mechanic or the functionality of a game (or indeed any other type of software). Copyright will protect the visual appearance of the game to the extent that it is original – such as by protecting the graphics, screen layouts and art assets. It will also protect the underlying software code. However, it will not protect the functionality.

View : : :
22.
 
Re: Op Ed
Dec 28, 2011, 08:50
22.
Re: Op Ed Dec 28, 2011, 08:50
Dec 28, 2011, 08:50
 
Overall, the "originality" meme that keeps popping up in game journalism is a bit of a red herring. There will never be another 100% original game made, just as there will never be a completely original song written. It's not that originality is dead; it's just that the limitaions of the art form and the human senses prevent further innovation, unless someone discovers another note in the octave or a 6th sense that everyone has access to. Someone looking for originality needs to look closer at the minutia and details.

I agree that people need to pay attention to the details when deciding whether or not a game is original. That said, some games are so blatantly unoriginal that it can be difficult to read between the lines. The Call of Duty games, for example. Or military shooters in general. When it comes to gameplay, there are definitely differences between Call of Duty and Battlefield, for example. However, it doesn't change the fact that the games have similar (or in many cases, exactly the same) weapons, enemies, settings, storylines, factions, themes, vehicles, etc. Part of the issue is that these games are inspired by reality and as such, draw from the same pool of reference. The other issue is that military shooters (CoD in particular) sell so well that most of them just stick to the same exact formula. There's a lot of unique gameplay that can be done in the military shooter genre, whether it be the open-world, simulation-based gameplay of the ArmA series or the potentially interesting moral choices of the upcoming SpecOps game. However, most publishers will just continue to copy CoD because it's a proven seller.

The market is dominated by first-person shooters and the first-person shooter market is dominated by CoD-alikes. If I see another completely linear, completely scripted, pseudo-realistic military shooter with regenerating health and completely linear and scripted sniping, rail and stealth segments, it'll be too soon. Unfortunately, we're guaranteed to see at least one more in 2012 and most likely again each year after that.

(see what I did there?)
Avatar 24934
Date
Subject
Author
1.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
2.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
3.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
4.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
5.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
6.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
7.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
11.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
12.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
8.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
9.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
10.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
20.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
24.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
   Re: Op Ed
25.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
    Re: Op Ed
27.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
     Re: Op Ed
26.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
    Re: Op Ed
13.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
14.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
15.
Dec 27, 2011Dec 27 2011
16.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
17.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
18.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
   Re: Op Ed
19.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
    Re: Op Ed
21.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
     Re: Op Ed
 22.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
      Re: Op Ed
23.
Dec 28, 2011Dec 28 2011
      Re: Op Ed