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1.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Sep 11, 2011, 13:28
nin
 
1.
Re: Out of the Blue Sep 11, 2011, 13:28
Sep 11, 2011, 13:28
 nin
 





2.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Sep 11, 2011, 14:12
Cutter
 
2.
Re: Out of the Blue Sep 11, 2011, 14:12
Sep 11, 2011, 14:12
 Cutter
 
Humans are so strange with their penchanct for the arbitrary, particularly with dates. 5 years means something but not a whole lot. Than 10 is fairly large for some reason. Then we really just forget everything else till it hits 25, then 50. By which time that which will people will "never forget" has mostly been forgotten. That and the insane reasons, bottom to top, for why all the insanity occurs in the first place. A strange species indeed.
"I didn't know you had it in you. Sorry, poor choice of words." - David
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3.
 
TNG
Sep 11, 2011, 14:43
3.
TNG Sep 11, 2011, 14:43
Sep 11, 2011, 14:43
 
im glad they are finally remastering to HD. hope they do a good job and maybe update some of the CGI special effects. you could tell the difference from the last season how much it has improved when compared to the first season.
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24 SSD 6TB
Sep 11, 2011, 14:57
4.
24 SSD 6TB Sep 11, 2011, 14:57
Sep 11, 2011, 14:57
 
why on earth did they have to defrag an SSD drive array? windows 7 intentionally writes data in a random pattern to solid state drives preventing deterioration.
5.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Sep 11, 2011, 15:11
5.
Re: Out of the Blue Sep 11, 2011, 15:11
Sep 11, 2011, 15:11
 
Here's a great story about a pilot on 9/11. She had no weapons on her F-16, but was tasked with taking down flight 93. What a truly inspiring person. And kind of a hottie to boot.

To prevent CV-19, avoid the Serious Seven: weddings, funerals, faith-based activities, bars, gyms, house gatherings and other small events.
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6.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Sep 11, 2011, 15:18
6.
Re: Out of the Blue Sep 11, 2011, 15:18
Sep 11, 2011, 15:18
 
I can't help but think that every day we continue to behave like wounded prey is another day that terror has stolen from us. To each their own, but I refuse to remember the dead by continuing to lick the wounds.
7.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Sep 11, 2011, 15:21
PHJF
 
7.
Re: Out of the Blue Sep 11, 2011, 15:21
Sep 11, 2011, 15:21
 PHJF
 
That's because mathematically-inclined creatures learn to value nice, round numbers of a base-ten system. I know I do.
Steam + PSN: PHJF
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8.
 
Re: 24 SSD 6TB
Sep 11, 2011, 16:28
8.
Re: 24 SSD 6TB Sep 11, 2011, 16:28
Sep 11, 2011, 16:28
 
Technically, the SSD itself is what does the wear leveling (not really random, but you get the idea). To Windows (7, 95, whatever) it's just another hard drive with linear sectors going from 0 to the end - the SSD though will remap them on writes to whatever block has been written least.

And yeah, regardless, defragmenting SSDs is almost entirely pointless.. However, I note that technically the OS will take ever so slightly longer to process fragmented files than unfragmented files, even if the access time on the drive itself is 0. But, since modern CPUs are so fast, the difference is basically undetectable, by people definitely, and so this is more academic than anything.. I suspect it wouldn't even be perceptible on a classic 8088 XT. Enjoy
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9.
 
Here is to Blue also 10 years later
Sep 11, 2011, 16:30
9.
Here is to Blue also 10 years later Sep 11, 2011, 16:30
Sep 11, 2011, 16:30
 
when the WTC towers were hit, many news websites went down or were jammed with traffic. Blue was good enough to post what he was watching on the TV news, so those of use without TV at work could still get info.

Thanks again Blue...
-------------------------------------------
Where's my BB gun?
10.
 
Re: Here is to Blue also 10 years later
Sep 11, 2011, 18:49
Ant
 
10.
Re: Here is to Blue also 10 years later Sep 11, 2011, 18:49
Sep 11, 2011, 18:49
 Ant
 
Steelcamp wrote on Sep 11, 2011, 16:30:
when the WTC towers were hit, many news websites went down or were jammed with traffic. Blue was good enough to post what he was watching on the TV news, so those of use without TV at work could still get info.

Thanks again Blue...
http://www.bluesnews.com/cgi-bin/board.pl?action=viewthread&boardid=1&threadid=28518 and http://www.bluesnews.com/cgi-bin/board.pl?action=viewthread&boardid=1&threadid=28505

http://www.bluesnews.com/cgi-bin/blammo.pl?mode=archive&display=20010911&oneday=true to read the rest of the day.
Ant's Quality Foraged Links (http://aqfl.net) & The Ant Farm (http://antfarm.ma.cx / http://antfarm.home.dhs.org).
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11.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Sep 11, 2011, 19:16
mag
11.
Re: Out of the Blue Sep 11, 2011, 19:16
Sep 11, 2011, 19:16
mag
 
ExitWound wrote on Sep 11, 2011, 15:18:
I can't help but think that every day we continue to behave like wounded prey is another day that terror has stolen from us. To each their own, but I refuse to remember the dead by continuing to lick the wounds.

QFT
12.
 
Re: 24 SSD 6TB
Sep 12, 2011, 13:24
12.
Re: 24 SSD 6TB Sep 12, 2011, 13:24
Sep 12, 2011, 13:24
 
zincthallinide wrote on Sep 11, 2011, 16:28:
Technically, the SSD itself is what does the wear leveling (not really random, but you get the idea) ...the SSD though will remap them on writes to whatever block has been written least.

so remapping does not make it random as opposed to sequential? windows 7 is the first version of windows to support the trim command for SSDs. it apparently helps performance.
13.
 
Re: Out of the Blue
Sep 12, 2011, 18:57
Tom
13.
Re: Out of the Blue Sep 12, 2011, 18:57
Sep 12, 2011, 18:57
Tom
 
People are always claiming that defragging files stored on an SSD is pointless because it will make such a tiny difference in performance. These arguments appear to be based on insufficient understanding of how SSDs and operating systems work. It's ESPECIALLY bad when people confuse wear leveling with filesystem fragmentation. SSDs perform wear leveling internally - the OS knows nothing about it, even with TRIM. The OS performs fragmentation - the SSD knows nothing about it, even with TRIM.

If you dig a little deeper, maybe even do some measurements, you'll find that there IS a real performance difference and the reason for its existence is completely logical.

Perhaps you've noticed that people tend to report several measurements when evaluating SSD sequential read performance. This is because there's a BIG - sometimes HUGE - performance difference depending on I/O size. For example, 4K vs. 64K vs. 512K. I/O size is how many bytes are read or write when the OS says to the drive "hey, read/write X bytes from/to location Y".

Well guess what. When your file is split into hundreds or thousands of fragments (which DOES happen in the real world), and you want to read it all in, sequentially, as fast as possible, what sizes do you think the I/O requests going to the drive are going to be? Will all the fragments be aligned on nice BIG boundaries? No. Because of fragmentation, you can't just zoom over the whole file in big chunks. You have to read a little from here, a little from there - gather all those fragments together. Performance won't be as bad as all 4K I/Os, but it won't be as good as all large I/Os either.

For example, I just did a real-world test with two files in my downloads directory, stored on an Intel 120GB SSD with 49GB free, running Windows 7:
File 1, 12MB, 189 fragments: read at 135MB/sec
File 2, 10MB, 1 fragment: read at 175MB/sec

That's a 30% difference. Reading other non-fragmented files consistently gets me very near 175MB/sec.

Bottom line: the performance penalty is not nearly as severe as with traditional disks, but it's hardly as miniscule as people claim. Fragmentation is something that gets worse as the contents of the volume are modified, and it can get really bad if the volume is low on space for a long time. By never defragmenting, your disk activity WILL get slower and slower. People attribute this to SSD internal implementation details such as wear leveling, poor TRIM, whatever, but the truth is that in many systems fragmentation will be a factor in that degradation over time.

I've raised this point several times with SSD manufacturers as well as the team at MS responsible for optimizing Windows 7 for SSDs. They all went through the following stages: 1) deny, 2) downplay, 3) grudgingly accept.

Why did I bother writing all this? I just think it'd be nice if people thought a little more about this topic and did some measurements themselves before making inaccurate claims. Use contig from Sysinternals to measure fragmentation for individual files. I wrote my own program to measure sequential read throughput for individual files, but there's probably something else suitable out there.
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