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Op Ed

Ars Technica - 4 rules for creating mainstream media gaming controversies.
CNN has been running a series of articles about a title called RapeLay that uses sexual assault as a game mechanic, but that particular title is an odd choice for controversy. It's not available in the United States, it's years old, and there are many other games with similar content still available. So why pick this game, and why return to the same subject over and over?

bit-tech.net - Why Everything Is Trying To Be An RPG Now.
While gamers often lament a lack of innovation in games, game mechanics change as rapidly as styles do in other forms of media - so while levelling has gone mainstream, the health bar appears to be on the way out and very few games these days features lives or continues. The question then, is why is levelling up so popular?

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26. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 18:59 Domgrief
 
Sepharo wrote on Apr 12, 2010, 18:15:
That's why my favorite "leveling" in an FPS was Wolf:ET

Although some probably disliked it as it only really rewarded the already good players thus making them even better.

I'm embarrassed that I forgot to mention ET - I have probably logged more hours in that than any other game.

It was brilliantly balanced, though* - even when I'm the least skilled player on a team, having high-level FOs and Medics on my team benefits me directly (and they level up by helping me out, even though I'm playing badly).

(*) FO airstrikes aside, perhaps.
 
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25. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 18:15 Sepharo
 
... because most of the time the RPG elements come into play within the scope of a single game ...

That's why my favorite "leveling" in an FPS was Wolf:ET

Although some probably disliked it as it only really rewarded the already good players thus making them even better.
 
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24. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 17:40 Steele Johnson
 
What's ironic is that the only genre that's becoming less of an rpg _is_ the rpg (e.g. Fable III).  
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23. for the donkeys Apr 12, 2010, 16:00 space captain
 
kallisti  
Go forth, and kill!
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22. why everything is trying to be awesome now Apr 12, 2010, 15:59 space captain
 
the question then, is why is a carrot on a stick so popular?

because people are donkey-like? or perhaps they are just donkeys?

why is WoW so popular? why do people want to make money?

arggggh!! such mind-bending and mysterious questions!
 
Go forth, and kill!
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21. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 15:33 Jerykk
 
I think it's better than thrusting so many weapons at the player. Instead of having to grapple right off the bat with "which gun is better" and "should I be using claymores or frag grenades" the player instead is incrementally given the options to adjust their equipment over an expanse of time. It's less overwhelming to new people.

That's why I think it's better for shooters to have a small set of unique, balanced weapons as opposed to 50 slightly different weapons. Quake and Tribes come to mind.

As for unlockables, multiplayer shooters simply shouldn't have them. It's inherently unbalanced. Even if each unlockable is theoretically balanced with the other weapons, the increased amount of choice gives higher-level players an advantage. All weapons and items should be immediately available to all players. The only distinction between players should be skill.
 
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20. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 15:03 PHJF
 
Leveling in a shooter isn't a job, it's just something that happens as you play normally. At least that's how CoD4 was. I just played with the m15m16 for like a week and suddenly I was lvl 50.

I think it's better than thrusting so many weapons at the player. Instead of having to grapple right off the bat with "which gun is better" and "should I be using claymores or frag grenades" the player instead is incrementally given the options to adjust their equipment over an expanse of time. It's less overwhelming to new people.

Granted that only works when the unlockable items don't pose serious balance issues. At least in CoD4 everything was pretty well balanced (except maybe the P90).

This comment was edited on Apr 12, 2010, 15:30.
 
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19. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 14:19 Domgrief
 
Maybe I'm just a pessimist, but I was surprised by DICE's claims that they developed levelling as a core mechanic to give gamers continuity in their multiplayer experience.

I had been under the assumption that levelling systems are making their way into FPS games so that I get addicted to unlocking the next item, and continue to play even after I buy my next FPS.

This increases the chance that my friends will buy the game even a year after its release (so they can play along with me), and increases the chance that I'll still be playing when the next paid DLC comes along.

In either case, I'm a bit disappointed that I need to log X hours/kills/tricks before I'm allowed to use half of the weapons that are coded into a modern FPS.

I find the use of RPG elements in RTS and strategy games (e.g. WC3, DoW, or HoMM) much more enjoyable, because most of the time the RPG elements come into play within the scope of a single game, and they add an extra dimension of gameplay for those of us not so good at micromanagement. Counter-Strike, or Science and Industry, probably best represent those mechanics in FPS games.
 
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18. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 12:59 BobBob
 
Cool, I will check out Risen.  
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17. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 12:35 Jerykk
 
Whereas an RPG intentionally dumbs you down in the beginning in order to make you grind your way to success by unlocking abilities that are not inherit to your direct experience as a gamer.

I don't have a problem with RPGs doing this. The whole point of an RPG is roleplaying and if only the player's skill matters, there's not going to be a whole lot of roleplaying because the player can do pretty much whatever they want. For example, in Risen, I defeated the strongest fighters in the bandit camp without investing a single point into my Strength or combat skills. I was able to do this because my personal skill was more important than my character's skill.
 
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16. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 11:34 BobBob
 
http://preview.tinyurl.com/y54lkgc

This comment was edited on Apr 12, 2010, 11:43.
 
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15. Re: RPGs Apr 12, 2010, 11:27 nin
 
Thanks for the "ignore" function reminder though.

Yep. See ya Boobboob, er ta ta...
 
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14. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 11:11 BobBob
 
Yes, true. I'm finding myself relying on indie games for that intensity skill based intensity.

I really like this guy's work:

http://www.charliesgames.com/wordpress/?page_id=203

As you say, the old Quake style is what I'm probably referring too. I'm finding RFG (sorry for the repetition) is very much like that. I would like to find others as well. Any recommendations?
 
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13. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 11:07 Verno
 
Well I agree with you but I'd also like to play videogames and not many people are making the old Quake style of FPS for example. I could sit around not playing games and yearning for the older days or I can put up with the stupid leveling systems in order to have some fun.  
Playing: Ni No Kuni 2, Persona 5, Vermintide 2
Watching: Annihilation, The Quiet Place, A Dark Song
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12. Re: RPGs Apr 12, 2010, 11:06 BobBob
 
I see what you mean. I'd rather have the game become more difficult (increasingly superior AI, better equipped AI, etc), and the leveling up is my own skill level increasing as I learn to master the game, instead of being spoon fed abilities. Just a different taste in gaming I guess.  
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11. Re: RPGs Apr 12, 2010, 11:03 BobBob
 
InBlack wrote on Apr 12, 2010, 10:54:
Unfortunately being an asshat is hardly a unique quality to you or any other troll for that matter. Thanks for the "ignore" function reminder though.

Verno brings out the intellectual in me. You just bring out diarrhea.
 
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10. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 11:03 Verno
 
I think you missed the point though Bob, they were referring to RPG mechanics being used in other titles. The leveling system in most modern FPS games as an example. The answer is that people love little goals they can accomplish in games because real life goals are often quite difficult by comparison. It's the whole instant gratification thing over and over again.

edit: nevermind, you added a whole paragraph.
 
Playing: Ni No Kuni 2, Persona 5, Vermintide 2
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9. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 10:56 BobBob
 
Thanks Verno. I just wish there were more titles like RFG, Just Cause 2, etc. I really like action based games. Story-lines with lots of dialogue are great for movies and books, but for video-games they get too linear and reduce much of the potential open-endedness that could exist. Granted, sand-box games can get repetitive, but as long as there is enough variety, you almost create your own story during each mission. The other problem with RPG style games are leveling up. I'll take RFG or Half Life 2, for example, you don't level up, you simply get better stuff. The skill increase is 100% you and what you can do with the increased availability of weapons and vehicles. Whereas an RPG intentionally dumbs you down in the beginning in order to make you grind your way to success by unlocking abilities that are not inherit to your direct experience as a gamer.

Do I make sense?

This comment was edited on Apr 12, 2010, 11:02.
 
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8. Re: RPGs Apr 12, 2010, 10:54 InBlack
 
Unfortunately being an asshat is hardly a unique quality to you or any other troll for that matter. Thanks for the "ignore" function reminder though.  
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I have a nifty blue line!
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7. Re: Op Ed Apr 12, 2010, 10:49 Frijoles
 
How long has there been an ignore button?? I've never noticed it.  
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