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User information for Bob Bob

Real Name Bob Bob   
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Nickname BobBob
Email Concealed by request
ICQ None given.
Description Bob Smith
Homepage http://
Signed On Jul 30, 2009, 05:12
Total Comments 2823 (Senior)
User ID 55121
 
User comment history
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
15. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 21, 2016, 19:48 BobBob
 
Kind of sort of but maybe not really relevant -- I highly recommend reading this story.  
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
9. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 21, 2016, 14:16 BobBob
 
I envy that you can bbq and grill. The smoke gives me an asthma attack. I can't even be around a fireplace or campfire.  
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
3. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 21, 2016, 11:25 BobBob
 
Damn hot yesterday .. back to beach office mode. Thumbsup  
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
44. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 20, 2016, 10:21 BobBob
 
descender wrote on Jun 15, 2016, 10:52:
Some people are just not crazy until they are. Blaming it all on mental health is a good way to hide from the other things that could be changed to limit exposure and accessibility to cause such chaos.

Limit exposure how? Censorship? Removing the person's right to use the library? If a person is psychotic, watching Saturday morning cartoons can lead to delusions and paranoia.

People don't just drink a cup of insta-crazy. Psychological problems manifest and typically start at an early age unless there is a brain trauma. My issue is with the creation of LPS and the repeal of the Mental Health Systems Act. The combination of both left us with an entirely inadequate infrastructure to take care of people with mental illness - including outpatient therapy - lack of long term treatment (hence rampant homelessness) and lack of early intervention for psychosis (ex: UCSB, Orlando, Connecticut, Colorado, and others). Of course, not all of those with a mental illness are an imminent danger to society, but it just so happens those involved in mass shootings all had an inclination toward or history of mental illness. If the perpetrators had been under mandatory therapy it's likely the tragedies could have been averted via regular counseling and treatment to redirect or prevent paranoid ideations and delusional thoughts, etc.

This comment was edited on Jun 20, 2016, 10:30.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
43. Re: Crazy! Jun 20, 2016, 10:01 BobBob
 
*Merged...*

This comment was edited on Jun 20, 2016, 10:29.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
19. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 17, 2016, 20:55 BobBob
 
Was it an iPhone? There possibly goes the warranty .. unless you bought that extra non-Apple damage protection insurance.  
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
32. Re: This would be awesome! Jun 16, 2016, 14:08 BobBob
 
RedEye9 wrote on Jun 16, 2016, 11:50:
Hillary Clinton is considering Sen. Elizabeth Warren for her running mate for the Democratic presidential ticket.

I wonder what would happen if she chose Sanders and he said yes.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
9. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 16, 2016, 14:01 BobBob
 
Creston wrote on Jun 16, 2016, 13:21:
It causes cancer. It causes no cancer! Eggs are good for you! Eggs are bad for you! No, they're good!, No, now they're bad again! No, good again. No, bad! Beer is bad. No, a glass of beer is good! Wine is good! No, it's bad! No, it's good!


Health "science" at work.


Speaking of which, I just discovered the postings of this guy. My new favorite 'comedian'. If you like that, he also has good videos on atheism and conspiracy theories.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
29. Re: Windows Update Jun 16, 2016, 10:45 BobBob
 
If Hillary can propose reasonable and rational alternatives to Trump's fear mongering and sweeping 'hate based' solutions, she can pull some of his centrist crowd into her camp. Albeit, it will be difficult because typical Trump supporters seem to have a narrow focus on one or two subject matters and can't see the big picture. They often permit everything else he says without criticism in hope that he'll get one or two results completely accomplished. (Does this remind you of something in history?) His hate-filled, black & white style, solutions directly address schematic fears to the point of conjuring up an imaginary and euphoric ambitions while imbuing a social strength through a delusional sense of group righteousness. (Does this also remind you of something in history?)

However, Hillary won't be able to convince the homophobic, racist, or fanatical Trump supporter to change his/her beliefs - those can only be countered by an advanced education or real life experiences. Despite all the rants on the Internet, I don't think the extremes reflect a majority. Most people simply want to earn a decent income, live in secure surroundings, and enjoy a peaceful life - and would rather ignore the petty details of what others are doing.

This comment was edited on Jun 16, 2016, 11:19.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
17. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 15, 2016, 16:30 BobBob
 
I have 3 degrees.  
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
12. Re: Prey Announced Jun 15, 2016, 13:11 BobBob
 
nvm  
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
39. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 15, 2016, 09:57 BobBob
 
VaranDragon wrote on Jun 15, 2016, 03:32:
BobBob wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 13:34:
As I suspected he was clearly a psychopath

Wow you must be some kind of like, super smart guy or something.

Make fun all you want, but all these topics - religion, gun control, politics - distract from the underlying cause (mental health issues) and will not prevent future tragedies. If he was bipolar, on steroids, and a psychopath, it was only a matter of "when" not "if" due to lack of psychiatric intervention. I don't anything funny about this.

This comment was edited on Jun 15, 2016, 10:18.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
34. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 14, 2016, 20:33 BobBob
 
Cutter wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 20:31:
BobBob wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 20:27:
Cutter wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 20:12:
If life can appear randomly here, it can - and has - elsewhere in the universe.

Why do you use the word 'randomly' and yet provide a specific criteria?

Because it appeared randomly here predicated on the circumstances I just mentioned. Seriously man, are you trolling here or just obtuse? This isn't rocket surgery.

If it were random we would have no way to methodically discover the origin of ourselves or nature of the universe. It's the very fact it wasn't random -- explainable and plausible -- is why we believe to able to understand the past and speculate the future. It's also possibly the same reason we shouldn't make a jump into thinking that life in the universe suddenly exists elsewhere simply because we can imagine it so.

Empirical evidence has so far demonstrated that the universe (and life) expanded and evolved from a single origin. It's equally possible (with the only supporting evidence) that we are the first epoch in a series of cosmic life evolution, similar to the first single cell organisms on Earth.

This comment was edited on Jun 14, 2016, 21:18.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
31. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 14, 2016, 20:27 BobBob
 
Cutter wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 20:12:
If life can appear randomly here, it can - and has - elsewhere in the universe.

Why do you use the word 'randomly'? One might as well postulate the existence of alien unicorns with telekinetic powers for that matter.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
28. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 14, 2016, 19:52 BobBob
 
Mr. Tact wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 19:46:
BobBob wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 19:41:
Why assume 'modern man' is the final species when evolution historically demonstrates a pattern otherwise?
Why assume otherwise? Sure, we might get wiped out by a virus or an asteroid, but I don't see any reason to assume that will happen either.

Look how young we are and how short of a period our kind has existed. In a period of 7 million years we have only been around for about 30K to 250K. There is more reason to think we are merely a link in an evolutionary chain than the final outcome.

http://humanorigins.si.edu/sites/default/files/Dating_JC_full_1.jpg

We could evolve to, or be overtaken by, another version of 'humans'.

Consider:

"More than 99 percent of all species that ever lived on Earth are estimated to be extinct. Estimates of Earth's current species range from 10 to 14 million, of which about 1.2 million have been documented."

"Genetic drift may therefore eliminate some alleles from a population due to chance alone. Even in the absence of selective forces, genetic drift can cause two separate populations that began with the same genetic structure to drift apart into two divergent populations with different sets of alleles."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution

"In August 2014, a team reported on a new analysis of 40 sites in Western Europe, concluding that Neanderthals died out about 40,000 years ago. This date, much earlier than previous estimates, was established through improved radio carbon dating methods. Researchers want to expand their survey of sites to Eastern Europe and Siberia, as Neanderthals may have survived longer there.

Hypotheses on the fate of the Neanderthals include a failure or inability to adapt to climate change, competitive exclusion, or extinction by encroaching anatomically modern humans, who arrived in Europe long after Neanderthals had settled there.

Neanderthal hybridization with early modern human populations is also considered a viable hypothesis. Some interbreeding took place in western Asia about 50,000 to 60,000 years ago, as evidenced by 1 to 4 percent of the material of genomes carried by non-African people living today."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neanderthal_extinction

This comment was edited on Jun 14, 2016, 20:05.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
26. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 14, 2016, 19:41 BobBob
 
Mr. Tact wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 19:32:
Cutter wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 18:01:
You can't travel at the speed of light, but there's nothing that says you can't bypass it. Everything from warp bubbles to folding space to string theory and quantum entanglement are just the beginning. I believe it's fully possible. Simply that man won't survive long enough to get there.
It might be possible, unfortunately even if it is possible it is extremely unlikely it will be discovered in our lifetimes. Which is definitely the single largest disappointment of my life. As to whether we'll survive long enough as a species to reach that point, is certainly debatable. Personally, even though I won't live to see it, I like to hope we can make it.

Why assume 'modern man' is the final species when evolution historically demonstrates a pattern otherwise?
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
24. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 14, 2016, 19:14 BobBob
 
Playing devil's advocate ...

There is more evidence to say that life evolves from a single source than spontaneously exists from multiple locations.

Let's base this on evolution -- which states:

"All life on Earth shares a common ancestor known as the last universal ancestor, which lived approximately 3.53.8 billion years ago, although a study in 2015 found "remains of biotic life" from 4.1 billion years ago in ancient rocks in Western Australia."

"Repeated formation of new species (speciation), change within species (anagenesis), and loss of species (extinction) throughout the evolutionary history of life on Earth are demonstrated by shared sets of morphological and biochemical traits, including shared DNA sequences.[10] These shared traits are more similar among species that share a more recent common ancestor, and can be used to reconstruct a biological "tree of life" based on evolutionary relationships (phylogenetics), using both existing species and fossils. The fossil record includes a progression from early biogenic graphite, to microbial mat fossils, to fossilized multicellular organisms. Existing patterns of biodiversity have been shaped both by speciation and by extinction. More than 99 percent of all species that ever lived on Earth are estimated to be extinct. Estimates of Earth's current species range from 10 to 14 million, of which about 1.2 million have been documented."

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution

Perhaps Natural Selection is also the way the universe works. What if Earth survived the natural selection process and is the 'beginning' origin of life throughout the universe? It would fit into the paradigm of a single origin of life on Earth that spread and evolved on the planet.

The universe is claimed to be 14 ~~ billions years old.

That's about 10 billion years for the universe to expand, select, and eventually give rise to Earth and its life to occur.

It took nearly 4.5 ~~ billion years for humans to arrive (approx 7 million years ago), modern man approximately 125,000.

Modern humans are speculated to originally come from Africa (notice a single source / location).

Let's assume roughly 4 billion years ago life formed on the planet. Did it start to form in several areas on Earth or just a single spot and spread? If the origin is singular (as evidence is showing) and it spread, why do we assume such spontaneous reactions occured throughout the universe? Let's assume life on Earth has a singular origin (the first amino acids) and migrated by sea currents and eventually by land via plate tectonics. If that's the case, it logically follows that humans might be the first lifeform to migrate by space and spread by such an evolutionary process to other worlds. In other words, if humans are the first lifeforms to spread (colonize) the universe it follows the pattern of the origin of various species evolving from a single source and location and spreading throughout the planet.

Other than evidence of life on our own planet, name one single piece of evidence or reason we should believe that life exists on any other planet. So far, all we've seen is that life cannot exist elsewhere. What if there is only one in a trillion possibilities for life to exist on any planet and we so happen to be that one in a trillion?

If the universe is so young, we could be the first. 4 billions of years of life existed on our own planet before the human species. It's possible when we colonize other planets that we are simply part an evolutionary chain that will populate the universe as has been the case with our own planet.

You can speculate that species of life existed before ours on other planets and that the universe had a beginning but that implies that something was probably first. Why assume that Earth isn't the first?

If you're going to use a Star Trek analogy -- well that only shows that life existed from a single species who spread their DNA across the cosmos - ST:TNG The Chase. Perhaps that species is us.

Besides fantasy and speculation, I'm waiting for some real evidence. It's quite possible we are the only ones - as part of a chain of life in the universe - and it makes logical sense if we are.

This comment was edited on Jun 14, 2016, 19:37.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
18. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 14, 2016, 15:47 BobBob
 
jdreyer wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 15:33:
BobBob wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 15:18:
jdreyer wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 15:01:
BobBob wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 13:34:
As I suspected he was clearly a psychopath but the discussions are all about everything else (gun control, fanaticism, hate, etc.) other than the lack of mental health awareness, diagnosis, proper treatment, and institutionalization.

Certain mental conditions like psychopathy, sociopathy, and NPD are only treatable if the afflicted admits the problem and seeks health. By definition, they think there's nothing wrong with them, or if they do they do their best to hide it. There isn't an easy way to otherwise diagnose and treat these people. And under the law, I don't think there's even away to have someone like that committed until they actually commit a crime. How would you stop a Mateen or a Ted Bundy?

Before the LPS Act they would have been early diagnosed, treated, and forced to be institutionalized. It's time for a revisit.

"In 1967, Gov. Ronald Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act (LPS), which went into effect in 1969 and quickly became a national model. Among other things, it prohibited forced medication or extended hospital stays without a judicial hearing."

Source.

And ...

"The Mental Health Systems Act of 1980 (MHSA) was United States legislation signed by President Jimmy Carter which provided grants to community mental health centers. During the following Ronald Reagan administration, the United States Congress repealed the law. The MHSA was considered landmark legislation in mental health care policy."

Source

Okay, but the LPS wouldn't have helped in this case. As I mentioned, these particular types of conditions are concealable, and even if LPS were in place, a functioning member of society with little or no criminal record isn't going to be institutionalized.

Quoting from the same article:

"Definitive statements are difficult to make and it is equally possible to find recent literature supporting the conclusions that the mentally ill are no more violent, they are as violent, or they are more violent than their nonmentally ill counterparts."

"Because of the significant methodological challenges faced by researchers in this field, the nature of this association remains unclear. For example, violence has been difficult to measure directly, so that researchers have often relied on official documentation or uncorroborated selfreports. The prevalence of violence has been demonstrated to differ dramatically depending on the source. Most samples have not been representative of all mentally ill individuals, but only of those with the highest risk of becoming dangerous, such as those who are hospitalized or arrested. Study designs have not always eliminated individuals with a prior history of violence (a major predictor of future violence), controlled for co-morbid substance abuse, or clearly determined the sequencing of events, thereby weakening any causal arguments that might be made."

Why? Because decades of laws have prevented forced psychiatric treatment and hospitalizations.

Just about all the shooters were diagnosed at one point in time with a mental illness or personality disorder. This particular person was constantly reviewed as a mental case by the authorities all the way back to elementary school (see my earlier post) where he was suspended. Early and forced intervention would have discovered this and put him under a regime of psychiatric supervision had proper legislation been supported.

If he was psychotic and taking steroids, without any psychiatric intervention, it may have been a tipping point.

Here's another: Example. Would have been forced to undergo a mandatory psychiatric evaluation if laws didn't prevent it.

This comment was edited on Jun 14, 2016, 16:10.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
13. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 14, 2016, 15:18 BobBob
 
jdreyer wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 15:01:
BobBob wrote on Jun 14, 2016, 13:34:
As I suspected he was clearly a psychopath but the discussions are all about everything else (gun control, fanaticism, hate, etc.) other than the lack of mental health awareness, diagnosis, proper treatment, and institutionalization.

Certain mental conditions like psychopathy, sociopathy, and NPD are only treatable if the afflicted admits the problem and seeks health. By definition, they think there's nothing wrong with them, or if they do they do their best to hide it. There isn't an easy way to otherwise diagnose and treat these people. And under the law, I don't think there's even away to have someone like that committed until they actually commit a crime. How would you stop a Mateen or a Ted Bundy?

Before the LPS Act they would have been early diagnosed, treated, and forced to be institutionalized. It's time for a revisit.

"In 1967, Gov. Ronald Reagan signed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act (LPS), which went into effect in 1969 and quickly became a national model. Among other things, it prohibited forced medication or extended hospital stays without a judicial hearing."

Source.

And ...

"The Mental Health Systems Act of 1980 (MHSA) was United States legislation signed by President Jimmy Carter which provided grants to community mental health centers. During the following Ronald Reagan administration, the United States Congress repealed the law. The MHSA was considered landmark legislation in mental health care policy."

Source

This comment was edited on Jun 14, 2016, 15:28.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
8. Re: Out of the Blue Jun 14, 2016, 13:34 BobBob
 
As I suspected he was clearly a psychopath but the discussions are all about everything else (gun control, fanaticism, hate, etc.) other than the lack of mental health awareness, diagnosis, proper treatment, and institutionalization.  
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