User information for Tangerinething

Real Name
Tangerinething
Nickname
Tangerinething
Email
Concealed by request
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Signed On
September 12, 2004
Total Posts
3 (Suspect)
User ID
21804
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3 Comments. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
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66.
 
Re: No subject
Jun 8, 2005, 17:44
66.
Re: No subject Jun 8, 2005, 17:44
Jun 8, 2005, 17:44
 
Space Captain: sorry, what I meant was virtually nothing that people think is public domain really is. People think that if it's free and public, it's public domain and you can do what you like with it. In fact nothing is public domain unless the author specifically says it is when he releases - if you say nothing, it remains your IP and you have the legal right to stop anyone from hosting it and take action against them if they continue.

I like the dude who wouldn't even credit Gamespot with upping their review score for the exclusive, going all the way to the much more dastardly paying of money. I promise you neither is the case - when Gamespot gives its unfair score, it will be entirely down to incompetence.

29.
 
Re: No subject
Jun 8, 2005, 04:29
29.
Re: No subject Jun 8, 2005, 04:29
Jun 8, 2005, 04:29
 
Trog, that's ridiculous. EA, like everyone else in the world, know that Gamespot would host this demo as soon as they humanly can, even if they release a press release calling them jerks. You don't have to do a site favours to get it to host the BF2 demo, everyone and their granma will do it.

Exclusives are rarely done for advertising either, since that's small change EA could easily pay for normally.

Exclusives are done for coverage. Anyone notice that Gamespot ran a huge new preview of BF2 just yesterday? They'll have agreed to give a certain number of pages, and give that article a certain prominent position on their homepage. Coverage is the one thing money can't normally buy. Gamespot might have done one anyway, but the deal will have guaranteed EA x pages and a primary hit on Gamespot's homepage for a certain amount of time, to ensure loads of people read about it and are excited.

Demos are never public domain, by the way - virtually nothing is. They're the intellectual property of the publisher, and it's absolutely illegal for anyone to host them without permission. Of course everyone does, and if there's no exclusivity agreement the publisher won't stop them - they'd grant permission if it was asked, but it rarely is. In the case of an exclusivity agreement, it's hard for a publisher to chase down every site with a cease & desist, and it's not really in their interest to do so since they want the demo to get everywhere (they've already got their part of the deal). But if they want to keep up good relations with Gamespot, they might try it. And it's not a legally ambigious situation - they hold all the cards.

24.
 
Re: .
Sep 12, 2004, 06:19
24.
Re: . Sep 12, 2004, 06:19
Sep 12, 2004, 06:19
 
It's not an illusion of AI, it's an illusion of intelligence. Hence, artificial intelligence. The same way an artificial flower creates the illusion of a flower.

I'm not really sure why we're talking about that anyway, this video doesn't really show the AI doing anything special except throwing a grenade.

What it does show is that the game is intense, varied, incredibly slick and profoundly satisfying. That makes me excited.

As for the overlapping shadow thing, yeah, it's an uncharacteristic oversight, but don't think for a minute you're going to see that in the finished game. Come on, fifty people working on this game for six months since that video was made - you think none of them have noticed it?

3 Comments. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
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