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User information for Orogogus

Real Name Orogogus   
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Signed On Feb 22, 2003, 03:15
Total Comments 1406 (Pro)
User ID 16241
 
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News Comments > VR Rifle and Haptic Vest Revealed
5. Re: VR Rifle and Haptic Vest Revealed Jan 5, 2017, 12:59 Orogogus
 
UttiniDaKilrJawa wrote on Jan 5, 2017, 11:12:
One thing I wonder is: how long before someone walks by a window at a house / apt and sees someone pointing this around in their home and then freaks out and calls the cops.

Probably quite a while? I think people with VR headsets try not to put them next to unobstructed windows. The lenses on the Vive and Rift are sensitive to sunlight, and it's just asking to be burglarized.
 
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News Comments > Sunday Mobilization
12. Re: Sunday Mobilization Jan 2, 2017, 04:41 Orogogus
 
jamiedj99 wrote on Jan 2, 2017, 00:25:
the accpetable margin for products failing is like 3-4% the battery epxloding was like .1% so no it was not a real issue

There are levels of failure. 3-4% might be acceptable for minor defects out of the box. But every 25th or 30th product catching fire would be somewhat catastrophic.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
61. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 30, 2016, 02:04 Orogogus
 
bigspender wrote on Dec 29, 2016, 17:33:
This isn't the course which my friend went on, but it's was similar: http://www.auspen.org.au/events/auspen-advanced-clinical-nutrition-course-2016/
Look at the sponsors: Nestle...... and a Pharma company specializing in chronically ill patients (why are the patients chronically ill, if the diet is so healthy?).

That's a clinical nutrition course, for feeding hospitalized patients. Note the focus points regarding acute phase response, albumin kinetics, and enteral/parenteral nutrition. That's not a course for telling people what to eat at home. And when I go to the US home page of that pharma company, Fresenius Kabi, they have several clinical nutrition products -- that is to say, IVs.

Can you find another one that's more representative of what you're talking about?
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
58. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 29, 2016, 13:08 Orogogus
 
jdreyer wrote on Dec 29, 2016, 03:23:
Orogogus wrote on Dec 29, 2016, 02:21:
I believe they don't have to do any encouraging, and if they did it would backfire almost immediately. How many times do they have to suggest to (real) doctors to encourage patients to eat more bacon before one of them outs it on the Internet?
You may have heard of this doctor before that encouraged people to eat as much bacon as they liked: Doctor Robert Atkins.

He wasn't the voice of the medical establishment, at all. Your family practitioner isn't going to tell you to go on the Atkins diet; that's by and large something people bring up on their own. And I don't think you're going to find any evidence that he was motivated by payouts from the drug industry.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
55. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 29, 2016, 02:21 Orogogus
 
bigspender wrote on Dec 28, 2016, 18:42:
I'm not sure if you have ever seen that show called Doctors? But they are constantly telling people to eat bacon and eggs for breakfast, they push ketogenic diets, paleo diets and other cholesterol heavy foods.(and shunning healthy staples like potatoes).
Other celebrity doctors like Dr. Axe doing a similar thing.

I haven't seen it, but I don't think celebrity doctors count. People giving advice primarily through TV are probably entertainers first and medical practitioners second. They're shysters promising people what they want, \a way to lose weight without eating less and exercising more.

Like I mentioned, the conferences and training programs that doctors are sent to are funded by drug companies - why else would a drug company sponsor it if they weren't getting something back? EDIT: my local doctors office is full of pamphlets that look very similar to official dietary guidelines, except in the fine print they are industry created, and of course they tell you to eat more eggs, red meat etc These pamphlets wouldn't fool you or me, but the general public will take read them in waiting room and assume the information is correct, since it's at the doctors office.

Drug companies do have a history of getting cozy with doctors, I just don't believe that they're behind the dietary aspect. There are problems that would exist even without nefarious intent -- we can have firemen without them also being arsonists, we can have SAT prep classes without them secretly encouraging kids to text in shorthand so they'll be bad at formal writing.

Yes exactly, obesity itself causes problems, which is why there is a big incentive to encourage more people to be obese, and keep them that way. Obesity related diseases do not kill people quickly, so they will be able to keep taking the drugs for a long time. Drugs that treat (not cure) chronic diseases are where they make all of their money.

I believe they don't have to do any encouraging, and if they did it would backfire almost immediately. How many times do they have to suggest to (real) doctors to encourage patients to eat more bacon before one of them outs it on the Internet?

On the other hand I do believe the food industry is doing a ton of consumer-unfriendly lobbying and advertising. The sugar lobby was in the news recently for making a bogeyman out of cholesterol fat for decades so they could sell more soft drinks and sweets, shouting down research that disagreed with their goal of selling more product. The corn industry's lobbying for subsidies and use of HFC in everything is well documented. This kind of thing does make people fat, and they totally are in bed with government. Industry is just not subtle enough to go for a long game of getting people sick to sell more pharmaceuticals.

I work for a company that makes glucose meters and cholesterol tests, and while we would sell more products if there were more people at risk, I'm 99% certain that we don't belong to any organization that actually encourages people to get fat and we definitely aren't doing anything like that on our own. It's unnecessary and counterproductive.

I believe the drug establishment is in the same position. They don't have to do anything to get more fat customers, that will happen on its own. That's how society goes, and to a large extent it's how we, as animals, are wired; we're designed for scarcity and not for plenty.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
52. Re: Out of the Blue Dec 28, 2016, 18:00 Orogogus
 
bigspender wrote on Dec 28, 2016, 16:48:
The big money are these chronic diseases, they never go away as long as the patients keep following the doctors dietary advice. (And it's easy advice to follow, when the doctor tells you to eat more bacon)

I don't expect big pharma to be telling people that heart disease is completely optional, avoidable and reversible. That's the doctors job - but when the doctors (who are viewed as trusted sources) have been primed to pass on false information, then that is pretty awful.

So while Big Pharma isn't causing the diseases directly, it's certainly enabling other industries and companies to create the market for them.

It's not just the doctors either, it's the USDA and so on. They're all in bed together, and if it wasn't for organisations like PCRM.org putting in lawsuits against the USDA then we'd probably be eating pork with pre-injected statins and thinking that our genes are the cause of our chronic diseases.

I don't see a ton of evidence that the medical establishment has been primed to dispense bad dietary advice. I've never heard of doctors telling people to eat more bacon. Americans, and developed nations in general, lean towards self-destructive gluttony. It's a very, very hard thing to reverse, stop or slow down. Whenever and wherever there's widespread economic growth obesity and diabetes follow.

The health problems that come out of obesity happen pretty much by themselves, there's very little need or incentive for Big Pharma to try to make it any worse.

And if there were any kind of miracle pill or diet that cures these things that kill everyone, I'm sure we'd have seen it on our pets. There are people who would feed their cats or dogs anything, some of whom who can kill their own game or grow their own vegetables, if it would let them live 10 or 20 years longer. Instead, pets who eat good food and bad food all last about just as long (not counting the same problems with obesity and diabetes that people have). No one's cat or dog gets to be 50 or 60 years old no matter what they do or don't eat, and there's no magic treatment that cures their maladies.
 
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News Comments > Vaporware Awards
26. Re: Vaporware Awards Dec 27, 2016, 16:09 Orogogus
 
Kxmode wrote on Dec 27, 2016, 15:52:
Orogogus wrote:
After that basic bit, you wrote, "that's precisely what a Ponzi scheme is." And Cutter called it a classic ponzi scheme.

Like I said, even if you believe they're just stringing people along with virtual ships with no intention of releasing an actual game, that would still just be a regular old con.

Okay, now you're getting into semantics. You do realize "that's precisely what a Ponzi scheme is" is a child of the parent thought "In its basic form". In other words, they are inclusive to one another, also known as context. That being said I do agree it has the characteristics of a con; specifically, a long con. I wrote a comment about that last year.

This was getting grindy over semantics and I was going to let it go, but eh, screw it, it's a slow work day and the Internet can handle it.

In no way does "In its basic form" imply that you mean "kind of similar to" or "sharing some of the characteristics of." No one would read "in its basic form" to modify or mitigate "precisely", the logical reading is that you're reducing Star Citizen to its fundamental components which are, whoa, textbook Ponzi scheme.

In its basic form, heat pump is precisely what a refrigerator is. In its basic form, the genetic code is precisely a language for data storage and transfer. But in its most basic form, there's no way in which Star Citizen is precisely a Ponzi scheme.

Literally a million times worse than Hitler.
 
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News Comments > Vaporware Awards
24. Re: Vaporware Awards Dec 27, 2016, 15:42 Orogogus
 
Kxmode wrote on Dec 27, 2016, 15:19:
I specifically wrote "In its basic form" not "In its literal form." I am not advocating for or against the idea; I am only saying it has the characteristics of being a Ponzi without actually being one if that makes sense.

After that basic bit, you wrote, "that's precisely what a Ponzi scheme is." And Cutter called it a classic ponzi scheme.

Like I said, even if you believe they're just stringing people along with virtual ships with no intention of releasing an actual game, that would still just be a regular old con.
 
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News Comments > Vaporware Awards
21. Re: Vaporware Awards Dec 27, 2016, 15:12 Orogogus
 
Kxmode wrote on Dec 27, 2016, 14:49:
Orogogus wrote on Dec 27, 2016, 14:06:
Cutter wrote on Dec 27, 2016, 13:53:
The whole model is about keeping the money flowing in without nothing to show for it except the illusion that things are really happening. The alpha's they keep releasing is the same shit for several years now. That's a classic ponzi scheme.

That's not what the term Ponzi scheme refers to :/. That would just be a regular con.

He's referring to the idea that new concept ship sales basically provide the funds to finish already pitched concept ships that people bought. In its basic form, that's precisely what a Ponzi scheme is. Just like Social Security in America is a legal Ponzi scheme. There's nothing inherently wrong with a Ponzi scheme as long as the money continues to flow. It's when the money stops... that's when there's a problem.

No. The thing with new concept ships is just how cash flow works, and is also not a Ponzi scheme. A Ponzi scheme would specifically be when you're using funds from new investors to pay off the old ones. I don't see any evidence that the new ships are being sold to or bought by new backers rather than the existing whales. Also, this isn't being pitched as an investment that's meant to grow your money.

I dunno, find a definition somewhere and explain how this fits.
 
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News Comments > Vaporware Awards
13. Re: Vaporware Awards Dec 27, 2016, 14:06 Orogogus
 
Cutter wrote on Dec 27, 2016, 13:53:
The whole model is about keeping the money flowing in without nothing to show for it except the illusion that things are really happening. The alpha's they keep releasing is the same shit for several years now. That's a classic ponzi scheme.

That's not what the term Ponzi scheme refers to :/. That would just be a regular con.
 
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News Comments > Christmas Eve Tech Bits
4. Re: Morning Tech Bits Dec 24, 2016, 13:02 Orogogus
 
These things are never such good news as rah-rah-PC sites want to make them out to be. F2P is over half of the PC revenue, and of that more money comes out of Asia than the rest of the world combined, twice over. Mobile beat PC, because Pokemon Go happened.  
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News Comments > AU Fines Valve $3M
21. Re: AU Fines Valve $3M Dec 23, 2016, 14:33 Orogogus
 
Everything came back up about half an hour ago.  
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News Comments > AU Fines Valve $3M
16. Re: AU Fines Valve $3M Dec 23, 2016, 13:45 Orogogus
 
Dev wrote on Dec 23, 2016, 13:40:
Yeah steam is down hard, site, client, server status page, etc. Good ole valve, they ALWAYS ALWAYS have issues during a sale. You'd think they'd look at traffic growth patterns and plan for it. Wait, that's too boring, no one wants to wheel their desks over.
This time though, instead of glitches the whole thing is gone. Must all be asleep in Christmas vacation, must be no one monitoring at the office, must be no one setup for alerting on phones when network problems happen, steam twitter has no posts for 24 hours.

Their sale-related network issues don't usually torpedo everything, and usually it happens right when it starts (which it did for a half hour or so yesterday), not on the second day.
 
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News Comments > AU Fines Valve $3M
13. Re: AU Fines Valve $3M Dec 23, 2016, 13:39 Orogogus
 
Dacote wrote on Dec 23, 2016, 13:15:
BIGtrouble77 wrote on Dec 23, 2016, 12:31:
So Australian Steam users don't have the same refund policy that we have in North America?
HoSpanky wrote on Dec 23, 2016, 13:03:
Ok, but how long are the refunds supposed to be allowed for? Did Australia not get the 2 hour/2 weeks thing that US has with Steam?
It's not about the current refund policy, it's about the laws in Australia.

I don't think that's really the answer to what they're asking. It's kind of hard to tell, but the article implies the Australian government was looking at incidents from 2011-2014, and (not mentioned in the article) Steam's refund policy was instituted in mid-2015. So I think this fine applies to what they were doing up to that point.

I think what Valve got dinged on was not having a policy stating that users were absolutely entitled to a refund if they encountered a "major problem," and/or not giving such users refunds.

I have no reason to believe this summary of Australian consumer protection regulations isn't accurate: Link
 
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News Comments > Op Ed
41. Re: Op Ed Dec 16, 2016, 01:37 Orogogus
 
Mr. Tact wrote on Dec 15, 2016, 23:32:
I remember Lode Runner just being running around picking up boxes while bad guys chased you...

Well, yes, the boxes being gold. And like I said, you could melt the bricks next to you, either to access blocked areas or trap the bad guys.
 
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News Comments > Op Ed
38. Re: Op Ed Dec 15, 2016, 20:00 Orogogus
 
jdreyer wrote on Dec 12, 2016, 16:03:
Jumpman waz c64 Lode Runner.

Jumpman and Lode Runner were different games. In Jumpman you run and jump around to collect the circley things, with a variety of different opponents and obstacles. Lode Runner had you running around and melting bricks to get gold bars while being chased by bad guys.
 
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News Comments > etc.
15. Re: etc. Dec 15, 2016, 19:42 Orogogus
 
Agent-Zero wrote on Dec 15, 2016, 18:50:
nin wrote on Dec 15, 2016, 14:34:
IMO 3dfx is what drove those other companies to try and compete, and pushed d3d forward. W/o 3dfx and glide, I think software rendering would have stuck around for a lot longer...


you can also say Trump is good because he makes everyone realize that politics is bullshit... but I dont tend to rationalize things like that

I don't think nin is wrong. 3D cards before 3dfx, and most of the competition in the early years, was really lackluster. And there's no doubting that 3dfx was in it to make games better, selling an add-on board that did nothing else. Nvidia, Matrox, PowerVR and (most importantly) Microsoft would have been happy plodding along slowly for a few more years, maybe a lot of years.

I didn't even have a 3dfx card until the Banshee, but I don't doubt 3dfx and GLQuake gave 3D gaming a big push. You have 3dfx and market fragmentation on one hand, and on the other you're counting on Microsoft and their evergreen commitment to games. Without someone out there making them look bad, Microsoft generally gravitates towards ventures like GfWL, the Microsoft Store and the Microsoft Solitaire Collection. I don't bag on Microsoft nearly as much as most of the people here, but with the best will in the world it's hard to say that their motivation has generally been to benefit consumers by making something good. The Riva 128 was right about when Microsoft was in the thick of marketing using false comparisons and outright bullshit to knock down OpenGL. If there's any rationalization, I think that's where it is.
 
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News Comments > Morning Tech Bits
2. Re: Morning Tech Bits Dec 12, 2016, 13:04 Orogogus
 
Well, that's why teleportation is such a hotly argued issue. A lot of games go with teleporting to move around, and you immediately get people who will refuse to play them and demand walking. But walking makes a lot of people really sick really fast. So developers are still experimenting.  
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News Comments > Global Virtual Reality Association Formed
9. Re: Global Virtual Reality Association Formed Dec 8, 2016, 21:09 Orogogus
 
Kxmode wrote on Dec 8, 2016, 19:02:
This is why I think Hololens is going to be a VR killer. It's augmented reality. Projecting holograms into your environment can have wide application for builder apps, medical, gaming, social; you name it. Imagine a doctor performing surgery and he has all the patient's medical records off-sight. Or imagine a digital LARP event with real dragons and goblins. Or think about turning your home into a haunted mansion with spooky things around every corner. Lastly, the tech only projects holograms so I don't anticipate it requiring a lot of processing power.

Well, I dunno about that, since AR constrains your workspace to what you have in real life, and I feel like AR will have the same problem finding a killer app that makes tons of people want to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars.

But in any case I don't think that has much to do with the environment builder. It could work in AR, it could work in VR, each in different ways. I've run into several experiences on the Rift where they have a classroom, a bedroom, or an office -- just nice, simple rooms that feel surprisingly real.

I think the killer app will be something that runs with that. The Oculus Touch installation demo, First Contact, is one of those experiences, and I really hope they're planning to focus on what makes that more widely accessible than, say, wave shooters. I haven't tried Quill, Tilt Brush or Medium yet (and I think I've heard they're all very good) but I feel like Valve or Oculus would see surprising success from something as simple as putting you in a room with a bottomless stack of paper and some virtual markers and other art supplies.
 
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News Comments > Global Virtual Reality Association Formed
7. Re: Global Virtual Reality Association Formed Dec 8, 2016, 16:12 Orogogus
 
HoSpanky wrote on Dec 8, 2016, 14:53:
Nah. Can't imagine either of them being the killer app. It'll likely be something that literally cannot be done without VR, instead of something that's just been modified to work with it. I'd put my money on Valve figuring out what that is first.

For my money, the killer app should be an environment builder. Start out with a small room that you can furnish with beds, chairs, a TV and computer, decorate with flooring, posters, etc. Follow up with more rooms, a house, the outdoors. Keep releasing things to put in those rooms -- action figures, computer accessories, kitchenware, books, all kinds of things that people like to have but might not be able to afford or have room for in real life.

Follow up accessories with functionality. Achievements that show up as 3D trophies. Let people replace the game launchers with customizable menus and virtual shortcuts -- fiddling with a toy Sidewinder launches Elite Dangerous, stuff like that. A control panel that lets you change the day/night and weather outside. Writing and drawing tools, pets, virtual music players.

I'm really surprised that neither Valve nor Oculus had anything like this at launch. To me it seems obvious that people are going to be much more engaged in VR if it starts up into their own virtual home, the same way people get more invested into their computer desktops than in their console setups, but it doesn't seem to be happening.
 
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1406 Comments. 71 pages. Viewing page 4.
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