User information for Leon Medado

Real Name
Leon Medado
Nickname
pancreas
Description
Bluty!
Homepage
Signed On
November 28, 2002
Supporter
-
Total Posts
264 (Amateur)
User ID
15399
Search For:
Sort Results:
Ascending
Descending
Limit Results:
 
264 Comments. 14 pages. Viewing page 10.
Newer [  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  ] Older
22.
 
Re: AN
Mar 17, 2003, 22:51
22.
Re: AN Mar 17, 2003, 22:51
Mar 17, 2003, 22:51
 
Typical....WW3 is starting, I've not got a good seat and where the f*ck is my popcorn ?

CNN has been my best friend lately.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
79.
 
Re: believe it.
Mar 17, 2003, 01:08
79.
Re: believe it. Mar 17, 2003, 01:08
Mar 17, 2003, 01:08
 
They are working on becoming World Champion Ping-Pong players.

Stupid is as stupid does.

I don't think Valve can simply rehash the book-like linearity and intense scripted events of the original without boring a lot of us jaded FPS gamers (Look at Unreal 2.) MOHAA already placed that concept on the torture bed and stretched it's limbs to the point where they've almost torn apart.

Assuming they can't truly innovate gameplay-wise however, I think they can still pull HL2 off if Valve successfully recreates the feeling of awe and bewilderment the large-scale set-piece battles in the original inspired in us.

I'm sure most of us can remember the first time we met those Marine bastards, the dam with the Apache, the cliffside battle, the rocket launchpad, the tramride, the headcrabs + elevator scene, the G-Man looking down on us, the first time we set foot on jumping-puzzle-land, etc. Diverse, imaginative, and most importantly memorable situations that are indelibly marked inside every gamer's head. Something that many FPS titles seem to lack nowadays.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
58.
 
Re: Chance
Mar 12, 2003, 23:49
58.
Re: Chance Mar 12, 2003, 23:49
Mar 12, 2003, 23:49
 
...since you're not interested in leaving anyone alive.

I would love to see the Soviet PK Machinegun (The ones you probably saw in action in Afganistan) in the expansion. It's the AK's big brother.

On a broader note, I wonder what kind of theme the weapons will have. With Cate, her superspy gadgets were appropriately disguised as feminine fashion acessories and the only large small arm she ever carried on her lithe frame was the briefcase RL. Naturally (As in beffiting the stereotypical female assasin image) her most effective weaponry were silent or silenced, and the sniper rifles.

Will there be any gadgets at all? And if not, how will they fill the gap in weaponry without making it appear to be another tactical FPS?
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
16.
 
Re: Longhorn
Mar 10, 2003, 23:32
16.
Re: Longhorn Mar 10, 2003, 23:32
Mar 10, 2003, 23:32
 
...like we're all now glad we dont' have to worry about config.sys and EMS and XMS and those sorts of (now-)obsolete headaches.

My hierachially menued AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS files used for running different versions of DOOM ownz joo!!111.


With regards to running off the CD, how will they address the potentially long load times? HDD cache maybe?

Ditto on the memory aspect as well. I'd rather have a text-based prompt than an overly fancy 3D GUI.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
41.
 
Re: NOLF2
Mar 10, 2003, 23:09
41.
Re: NOLF2 Mar 10, 2003, 23:09
Mar 10, 2003, 23:09
 
While I didn't play Hitman 1, I thought the move the diversify the gameplay in Hitman 2 was half-heartedly executed. There was little reward to either going super-stealthy or guns-blazing (At least in IGI2 the maps hinted at the appropriate playstyle.) All you get is this inconsequential rating and a few unlockable weapons of questionable usefullness. IMO, at the end of each mission they should have given you a weapon suited to your playing style.

I didn't like Thief 2 as I did 1, primarily because of the story. It lacked the certain philosophical underpinnings (Clarity of Light versus the Imaginativeness of Dark) I enjoyed reflecting about in the first and had barely any more depth than a typical save-the-world-from-a-madman-and-his-doomsday-weapon movie. The ending was also a dissapointment since it had none of the finesse, suave and the foreboding sequel tie-in part of the original. I also missed the scared-as-shit moments I had in 1 (The ghosts were utterly badass), since your mostly human opponents in 2 were generally easier to defeat.

I like many have high hopes for DX2, particularly regarding the fact that they intend to completely pull-off the simulation aspect of gameplay. I didn't like the way some of the levels in 1 could only be finished using a fixed, definite set of options. Let's see if we truly can defy typical character achetypes this time around.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
33.
 
Re: Sequels...
Mar 10, 2003, 04:04
33.
Re: Sequels... Mar 10, 2003, 04:04
Mar 10, 2003, 04:04
 
Hehe... Unreal doesn't count. The original could hardly be considered recent (Way out of touch with the present gaming situation) and the sequel is practically a unanimous dissapointment regardless of prior expectations. It would seem that the devs of U2 tried to "reinvent" the original to fit into modern FPS conventions, but simply failed in execution.

On the opposite end of the spectrum however, I could point out the Project IGI series. The original was an exercise in hair-splitting frustration and quickly forgotten into the annals of mediocre FPS titles. The sequel however is getting consistently good reviews and is an absolute gem for fans of non-linearity. They managed to keep everything good about the first, add a few new features to increase it's longevity and diversify the gameplay, give it a good dose of spit and polish, and add just enough leeway to appease the non-hardcore. I know this doesn't count either since the original was far from great, but it is a perfect example of a sequel that has clearly improved over the original.

Whatever your assesment of the NOLF series maybe, the great thing about Monolith is that they never fail in putting a fresh spin on an ancient genre. You certainly can't fault them for that.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
27.
 
Sequels...
Mar 9, 2003, 22:49
27.
Sequels... Mar 9, 2003, 22:49
Mar 9, 2003, 22:49
 
While we're on the subject of sequels, can you guys name any recent great action games that have had even greater sequels? I have this nagging feeling that sequels of this magnitude tend to attract undue amounts of criticism.

Can a lower rating to a sequel be brought about not by the actual quality of the game but by the growing and increasingly rabid fanbase forciby dissecting every organ and orifice of their favorite meal's latest incarnation? In such a case it may never be possible for sequels to be perceived as superior to the original, as each new iteration is scrutinized to increasing degrees.

Or is it possible for the devs, in the perceptions of every member of the fanbase, to truly outdo themselves the next time around?


This comment was edited on Mar 9, 22:53.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
18.
 
Re: Hmmm
Mar 8, 2003, 23:50
18.
Re: Hmmm Mar 8, 2003, 23:50
Mar 8, 2003, 23:50
 
I have no complaints over the "stylistic differences" in NOLF2 over 1, these are just facile nitpickings IMO (The "straight" japanese villainess was used to enhance the chuckload of irony in the Ohio map. Don't you get it?) My issue with NOLF2's characters is that they simply weren't given enough time to articulate themselves. I remember reading a preview of NOLF2 which stated that this time around there won't be any dilly-dally between missions, the cutscenes will be straight to the point. I was dissapointed at that since I actually liked the dilly-dally in the original. It fleshed out the characters more and gave the missions a greater sense of relevance, in addition to adding more humor.

Don't get me wrong though, I thoroughly enjoyed NOLF2 (Even to the point that the next heavily-praised game I played seemed pale in comparison.) The unusual set-piece battles and 60s-stylized architecture alone are worth whatever little deficiencies and bits of frustration I encountered along the way.

And not playing Cate in the expansion should be a good thing, for the sake of fresh perspectives.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
5.
 
Re: No subject
Mar 6, 2003, 23:45
5.
Re: No subject Mar 6, 2003, 23:45
Mar 6, 2003, 23:45
 
Nah, NOLF2 2 was an excellent looking GAME. They could have run it through the Unreal engine and it would probably look just as good if not better.

The worst technical quirk I experienced with NOLF 2 was the way it started chugging slowly during certain scenes for no apparent reason. I solved the slow loading by disabling precaching.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
12.
 
Re: Eh?
Mar 4, 2003, 23:30
12.
Re: Eh? Mar 4, 2003, 23:30
Mar 4, 2003, 23:30
 
Allow me to generalize the differences between the enemies in the Pacific Theater and the European Theater into a form that every gamer should comprehend:

Germans = Protoss
Japanese = Zerg

Relative to the Americans and even ze Germans, the Japanese had very little respect for human life. Your honor and the overarching objective of winning the war were paramount, even if it meant self-sacrifice.

The Japs thought that they could apply such principles to POWs (and everybody they conquered in general), and thus their was a huge uproar of vengeance when Americans learned of the conditions their captured soldiers were being subjected to (There was so much uproar that a good chunk of the missions behind-enemy-lines Americans undertook in my country involved saving diseased, malnourished, practically dead POWs before they could be executed by retreating Japs.) Even though the Japs would willingly subject themselves to such conditions if their honor was at stake.

If they pull this off right, there won't only be a change in scenery (My guess is that it will involve a lot of island hopping, as in more amphibious and airborne assaults) but a change in gameplay as well.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
4.
 
Re: Far Cry
Mar 4, 2003, 01:07
4.
Re: Far Cry Mar 4, 2003, 01:07
Mar 4, 2003, 01:07
 
Agreed with Quboid concerning Splinter Cell. "OMG! How I am gonna breach this heavily fortified government installation perched on a steep hill??? I know! Do various acrobatic stunts using conveniently placed overhangs and pipes! Then find that one window that you can actually slide open!"

Living in a country on the western edge of the Pacific, guns, explosions, and military vehicles are first on the list of things I would not like to see in such a setting (Right above fully-clothed women.) A truly unusual place to go killing.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
9.
 
Fisher vs. Prince
Mar 4, 2003, 00:33
9.
Fisher vs. Prince Mar 4, 2003, 00:33
Mar 4, 2003, 00:33
 
I never got far in the original game, it was way too hard for my little self back then.

If any of you need your acrobatic fix right now though, there's none better than Sam Fisher in Splinter Cell to give it.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
26.
 
Re: Am I Alone On This?
Mar 4, 2003, 00:21
26.
Re: Am I Alone On This? Mar 4, 2003, 00:21
Mar 4, 2003, 00:21
 
The only thing that let me down in MOHAA was that it's entire concept was based around a movie-like linearity. The "feel of WWII" was only achieved through the visceral and frustrating nature of combat. That sense of bewilderment and confusion entangled with the gripping need for courageous decisiveness which I've read about in books doesn't exist. The game just naively pushes you from one battle into the next, betraying the fact that individual acts of heroism and not distanced dictation were in many cases what kept the Allied soldiers fighting.

MOHAA's singleplayer didn't rise at all above RTCW's IMO. Both were good, but not exceptional. Spearhead was in the same gameplay league but had much better presentation (More setpiece battles, better cutscenes, a few unique situations, etc.) Too bad it was extremely short.

I agree that the Omaha beach map was too heavily pimped, since it could have been much much more than a drastically simplified ripoff of Saving Private Ryan. Aside from the realistically copius amounts of blood and gore, we could have seen spectacular fire support from from the Navy on the way in and while we were stranded at the shingle, a couple of tanks perhaps providing cover but eventually getting blown up, getting off the ramp in 6ft of water and watching swirling bullet trails as you frantically try to inflate your Mae West (lifevest), engineers and SeeBees simultaneously blowing up rows of obstacles, more sidecommentary by fellow soldiers on how everything went wrong, etc. Basically, more of what really happened.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
12.
 
Re: No subject
Feb 27, 2003, 23:44
12.
Re: No subject Feb 27, 2003, 23:44
Feb 27, 2003, 23:44
 
The immersiveness of the FPS perspective simply begs for realism, and unfortunately the last big game that tried to distance itself from this trend turned out to be crap.

If you want fantasy and originality now, pick up an RPG.

BTW, I wouldn't call Deus Ex 2 original. Revolutionary, but not original. I was impossible for me to play the first game without picking up on the System Shock 2 and Thief influences.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
7.
 
Re: glen dahlgren
Feb 27, 2003, 23:12
7.
Re: glen dahlgren Feb 27, 2003, 23:12
Feb 27, 2003, 23:12
 
U2 scored an average of 77% percent in Gamerankings:

http://gamerankings.com/htmlpages2/4510.asp

I'd say that's about right. There are few articles that evoke an apparent fanboyism or bribery, hinting that we have in fact learned from the Black & White fiasco.

Those with a personal vendetta against this game will want to point out the low quality ratings given to the few glowing reviews of course.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
64.
 
Enforcement...
Feb 27, 2003, 00:27
64.
Enforcement... Feb 27, 2003, 00:27
Feb 27, 2003, 00:27
 
While I can't comment on German culture and governance since I know little about it, I am certain that such laws could not possibly be enforced in the totalitarian manner implied by some of you.

I mean, aside from the ubiquitious Warez argument, it can't be too difficult to import these games from nearby countries (Germany is not geographically isolated from the rest of Europe.) And there will be no doubt some slightly seedy, backalley stores that will simply ignore this ruling. As for advertising, well the internet hasn't been banned right? Any minor who really wants either of these games will find ways of getting them.

Oh, and the comparisons I've read in here likening Germany in WWII to today's Germany are bull. Read a bit of any literature on the subject and you find that even back then, not everybody there was a Nazi.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
36.
 
Re: base defence
Feb 26, 2003, 23:57
36.
Re: base defence Feb 26, 2003, 23:57
Feb 26, 2003, 23:57
 
As training for games against human opponents, skirmish is a joke. The AI consistently displays a lack of unit tactics and realistic behavior (Something that was somewhat successfully coded into War3), particularly when massing units (If you can call what the computer does a "mass".) It never sends enough units per wave, and rarely selects the appropriate targets for each unit type.

These deficiencies are especially apparent in the latter missions of Single Player campaigns. Initially, the computer's standing units and preset defences will be difficult to overcome. However once the money starts flowing and you attain a good rate of unit production you become unstoppable, since the computer's counterattacks don't adapt to yours.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
27.
 
No subject
Feb 25, 2003, 23:21
27.
No subject Feb 25, 2003, 23:21
Feb 25, 2003, 23:21
 
The last Craven mission wasn't so bad as long as you had the patience to use and cover your artilery, plus I brought it some fighters to get rid of those pesky bombers. Using my remaining nukes to blow up the last building was a very rewarding experience. I can remember the effects in GC were very spectacular, not as dense as in Generals but impressive nonetheless considering I only had a Voodoo Rush during that time.

The lack of an in-level saving feature did discourage me from getting the expansion, since I read it was even harder than the original. Being able to save the game not only helps ease the difficulty, but in this case it could have allowed the player to experiment with different tactics.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
25.
 
Re: 20 S.T.A.L.K.E.R
Feb 23, 2003, 21:57
25.
Re: 20 S.T.A.L.K.E.R Feb 23, 2003, 21:57
Feb 23, 2003, 21:57
 
S.T.A.L.K.E.R is shaping up to be the FPS equivalent of Morrowind in terms of the implementation of non-linearity. I wonder how they'll be able to put off the whole "reputation" aspect of gameplay (Morrowind was passable in that respect.) Too bad we have to wait until the end of the year for it.

Concerning the low-poly characters models in Devastation, I read in one preview that the reason behind this was so that they could show more of them at once. In my experience with Unreal 2 a large drop in FPS is always indicative of the prescence of visible character models, so that decision can only be a good thing.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
13.
 
Re: @(*!&#(@*#&(*@@!!
Feb 20, 2003, 22:46
13.
Re: @(*!&#(@*#&(*@@!! Feb 20, 2003, 22:46
Feb 20, 2003, 22:46
 
Quake 2 did have a militaristic, semi-realistic feel to it's graphics and story. Gray, Green, Blue, and Brown were the predominant colors in a radiosity-lit world, and it's weapons and level designs were almost functional in appearance. The interface had a dog-tagged look to it, and even the manual had the worn subtleties of a militray fieldbook. No loud contrasting colors, no deeply etched vertex shadows, no sci-fi party house paraphernalia sticking out of walls for no reason (Think Unreal 2.) The intro has echos of Normandy in it, with countless infantry futilely bombarding fixed fortifications with the goal of destroying a powerful defense mechanism (The Big Gun.)

However the context (Especially in the enemy character designs) and gameplay in which all these realistic elements were placed in was completely sci-fi fantasy. and therein lies what IMO was one of it's best jabs at immersion. It feels like an action game but it's realistic look added a suspension of disbelief.
"Nothing livens up a robotic hymn of doom more than an amazing pair of jugs." - Brak
264 Comments. 14 pages. Viewing page 10.
Newer [  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  ] Older