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Nickname Scottish Martial Arts
Email Concealed by request
ICQ None given.
Description
Homepage http://
Signed On Jun 16, 2002, 23:16
Total Comments 3007 (Veteran)
User ID 13410
 
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News Comments > Evening Metaverse
13. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 30, 2016, 11:02 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Timmeh wrote on Nov 30, 2016, 10:28:
Conservative Views are not stupid. Neo Liberal views on the other hand are bat shit insane.

You might want to Google Neoliberalism before going on a rant about it. Here's some help: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neoliberalism

If you cannot correctly identify what things are even called, it's hard to take your appeals to "reading a lick of real history" seriously.

This comment was edited on Nov 30, 2016, 11:15.
 
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News Comments > Titanfall 2 Free Trial This Week
1. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 29, 2016, 21:34 Scottish Martial Arts
 
I picked this up on a whim the other day and have been very pleasantly surprised. If you ever wanted a sequel to Shogo, with some Portal and Call of Duty mixed in for good measure, then this is it.  
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
12. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 23, 2016, 15:23 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Dacote wrote on Nov 23, 2016, 15:02:
The hair-loss drug is why I'm bald.

Once I saw the WHO hand cleaning method I quit washing my hands.
http://www.who.int/gpsc/clean_hands_protection/en/

The CDC does not go into enough detail. http://www.cdc.gov/features/handwashing/


A man entered a restaurant and sat at the only open table. As he sat down, he knocked the spoon off the table with his elbow. A nearby waiter reached into his shirt pocket, pulled out a clean spoon, and set it on the table. The diner was impressed. "Do all the waiters here carry spoons in their pockets?"

The waiter replied, "Yes. Ever since an Efficiency Expert visited our restaurant... He determined that 17.8% of our diners knock the spoon off the table. By carrying clean spoons with us, we save trips to the kitchen."

The diner ate his meal. As he was paying the waiter, he commented, "Forgive the intrusion, but do you know that you have a string hanging from your fly?"

The waiter replied, "Yes, we all do. Seems that the same Efficiency Expert determined that we spend too much time washing our hands after using the men's room. So, the other end of that string is tied to my penis. When I need to go, I simply pull the string, do my thing, and then return to work. Having never touched myself, there really is no need to wash my hands. Saves a lot of time."

"Wait a minute," said the diner, "how do you get your penis back in your pants?"

"Well, I don't know about the other guys, but I use the spoon."

wtf am i reading
 
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News Comments > Morning Tech Bits
23. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 23, 2016, 15:14 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Muscular Beaver wrote on Nov 23, 2016, 12:48:
Sounds logical. Yet that doesnt mean they werent there before. They just werent as vocal, because of the cancer that is PC.
People need to grow a thicker hide again, that is obvious when you look at what they often call racism or hate crime.
If everyone is that touchy and it would go mainstream even more, we would go into a catastrophe with light speed. History has shown that more than enough times.

The thing about political correctness is that conservatives don't seem to realize that it runs both ways. Just as there are plenty of things which conservatives don't feel that they can say in polite company, there's a lot of stuff liberals and leftists don't feel that they can say either. But everyone agrees to tone it down and not be particularly hateful in their words so that society can somehow continue to shamble along without collapsing in on itself. If conservatives truly hate political correctness, then they don't get to be scandalized when a person of color says "fuck the police" because it's that same political correctness which causes minority communities with bad policing experiences to usually limit their criticism to polite terms. Similarly, if conservative Christians truly hate political correctness, then they, upon calling homosexuality barbaric, don't get to be scandalized when gay people call Christianity a barbaric religion. And so forth.

Contemporary campus politics does, in my opinion, take the idea of political correctness too far: instead of us all having a mutual obligation not to disrespect other groups, campus leftists would instead say that we have no obligation to even hear things we dislike. That's a mistake, but it's no worse a mistake than thinking political correctness is solely something enforced by the left on the right.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
85. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 22, 2016, 19:20 Scottish Martial Arts
 
I'm dubious that Sanders would have had much of a shot. You have to remember that he was a total unknown to anyone who didn't pay attention to the Democratic primary, which would constitute most of the country. That would have meant that the GOP and Trump would have able to define him and hit him hard for being a self-described socialist and for having been in Congress for ~25 years with nothing significant to show for it. For example: "He says he's an outsider, but this out of touch Vermont socialist has spent a third of his life in Congress with no major legislative accomplishments. Do you really trust a do-nothing hippie to shake up Washington?" For broad swaths of the country, hearing that someone is a "socialist" is like hearing they eat babies; Bernie would have been demonized to the same degree that Hillary was demonized. Maybe he would have pulled it off, but I have my doubts.  
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News Comments > Morning Metaverse
7. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 22, 2016, 16:28 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Cutter wrote on Nov 22, 2016, 15:09:
jdreyer wrote on Nov 22, 2016, 13:21:
'Quit Social Media. Your Career May Depend on It.'

Or you could, you know, never start.

Or maybe not obsess on it, or just use an account with a fake name so employers can't spy on you, or work for someone who understands your private life is none of their fucking business to begin with because you're an employee and not property.


Your comment has literally nothing to do with the thrust of the article author's argument. He says absolutely nothing about spying employers; he says quite a bit about concentration being a valuable skill and resource, and that social media is designed to foster compulsive breaks in your concentration.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
69. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 22, 2016, 11:58 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Verno wrote on Nov 22, 2016, 10:59:
rethinking international economic policy approaches and moving away from elitism toward populism so that they can get back in power.

See, this is where a fantasy is being sold. US manufacturing output is at record levels, but changes in technology mean that we no longer need record levels of manufacturing workers. Likewise, the coal industry is being decimated simply because there are cheaper alternatives in larger supply. The notion that we're losing out to the Chinese is simply not true: low-skill American workers are instead losing out to advancing technology.

Any politician who appeals to nostalgia for the 1960s industrial economy is lying or is in denial. Going forward we need to be thinking about how to deal with the fact that our economy will continue to produce large quantities of wealth but will not produce large quantities of low-skill middle class jobs. Putting "America First" won't bring back the good jobs that technology has erased from existence, and the problem that the new right-wing Populism will face is that won't be able to deliver on its promises because in its simplistic appeals, it has misdiagnosed the cause of the problem. Aging low-skill blue-color workers really are in a shitty position, and frankly I don't know what the answer is for them, but I can say that trying to turn back the clock is doomed to fail. It's unfortunate, for them, that their new leader can only look backwards and doesn't have any answers for the future.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
63. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 22, 2016, 10:12 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Verno wrote on Nov 22, 2016, 09:55:
People mocked Trump's reluctance about accepting the results of the election but now many of the same pundits are making noise about the "popular" vote. To me it doesn't matter, she still lost no matter what. Whether she won the popular the vote by 3 million or 100,000, she lost the election. Frankly I'm not sure I would be so quick to trumpet (no pun intended!) the popular vote results when you look at the sheer amount of media backing and money behind her, I would be embarrassed by her performance. Either way its water under the bridge, shes done and there's no going back so the hand wringing is kind of silly.

I don't think its in the Republicans favor to dismantle the EC when it just won them the election either. Refactoring voting districts on the other hand, I can see that happening.

Speaking only for myself, I don't bring up the popular vote to suggest that Clinton somehow still has a path to the White House. Instead, I bring it up to suggest that Trumpism has a very limited mandate, if any mandate at all. Most discussions of the popular vote I have read usually preface their remarks with something along the lines of "she lost fair and square, and will never become President, but...", so I suspect that few commentators are actually agitating for some sort of different election outcome.

Edit - A representative example of the sort commentary to which I'm referring:

More Americans voted for Hillary Clinton than for Donald Trump. More Americans voted for Democratic Senate candidates than for Republican Senate candidates. And while we donít have final numbers yet, it looks likely that more Americans will have voted for House Democrats than for House Republicans.

So why arenít Democrats acting like it? Why arenít they trying to force Republicans, the media, and the emergent Trump White House to act like it?

This is not an argument that the election was rigged, nor that Trumpís win is somehow illegitimate. The president is chosen by the Electoral College. The Senate is built to favor small states. Gerrymandering is legal. America does not decide national elections by simply tallying up votes.

But the will of the voters still matters, or at least it should...

Democrats have confused the reality of being out of power with the idea of being in the minority. This lets the Trump administration and the Republican Party confuse the reality of being in power with the idea of having a mandate for their agenda.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
56. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 21, 2016, 23:22 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Dev wrote on Nov 21, 2016, 22:19:
jdreyer wrote on Nov 21, 2016, 16:22:
And still lost the popular vote by millions.
millionS requires at least two. It's less than that.

There are still several million outstanding votes however, most of them in heavily Clinton leaning areas. Los Angeles County, for example, still has 1 million votes remaining to be counted (at least as of this morning). Most back of the envelope calculations anticipate that Clinton's final vote lead will be in the neighborhood of 2.5-3 million.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
44. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 21, 2016, 18:27 Scottish Martial Arts
 
BobBob wrote on Nov 21, 2016, 18:18:
I can feel the normalization coming. Or I'm tired of feeling shocked, scared, and hopeless. I guess I'll just hope the California political force field can hold protect us for 4 years ... or more.

I increasingly suspect that Trump's foreign business entanglements will quickly lead to impeachment. By refusing to divest himself of ownership of his businesses and properties, he is setting his administration up to be in a continual state of conflict of interest. While denied by both, there is reporting today in the Argentine press that Trump and the Argentine President, in a congratulatory phone call for winning the election, discussed permitting issues with a Trump building project in Buenos Aires, which if true is a clear violation of the spirit, if not the letter, of the Emoluments Clause of the US Constitution. If stuff like this keeps coming up -- and Trumps refusal to divest will ensure that it does -- then it will only be a matter of time until Trump does something so egregious that the Congressional GOP will get sick of defending him against corruption charges and invoke articles of impeachment.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
41. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 21, 2016, 18:15 Scottish Martial Arts
 
unfortunately wrote on Nov 21, 2016, 17:35:
Good thing would-be's like yourself don't have any real influence. Have you read Madison/Federalist Papers? Do you know what 'tyranny of the majority' is? What the role of the Electoral College is re:same? Or would you like to abrogate well-considered protections simply because you don't favor the result of an election? The daily wall of self-proclaimed pol expert posts on this site is laughable. You may look into some humility- if you do so constructively, perhaps we'll see less pretentious pol narrative nonsense on this gaming website.


Ironic that you would cite Madison and the Federalist Papers considering that the therein stated purpose of the Electoral College was to safeguard the republic from the people choosing a demagogue or foreign pawn as their leader. By letting Electors, themselves chosen by state legislatures, choose the President, wiser and cooler heads would be allowed to prevail over an impassioned yet misguided majority. The Framers wanted the people to have a voice, but not too much of a voice, lest too much democracy lead to a democratic government tearing itself apart, as it had in the past.

The Electoral College as it exists today is a bit of an oddity, because the system has evolved such that the Electors are no longer the wiser men selected by state legislatures, but simple partisan loyalists, performing a purely ceremonial function, selected by the outcome of 50 separate statewide contests. In effect, we no longer have the safeguards against an unfit leader assuming the Presidency -- otherwise we'd be hearing a lot more about Electors planning to deny Trump a majority so that the Presidency will go to the House for selection of a more mainstream GOP politician -- and yet we don't have a purely democratic system either, as evidenced by Clinton's 1.6 million, and growing, lead in the nationwide popular vote.

I say if we're going to have an Electoral College, go all in and return Elector selection to the state legislatures. That would keep the Presidency in GOP hands for the foreseeable future, but on the other hand it would keep an incompetent demagogue from ever assuming the highest office. We'd also likely see much shorter and less expensive campaigns, since the "campaign" would mostly occur entirely inside state legislatures.

The Framers were terrified that the people couldn't be trusted to govern themselves responsibly; 2016 and Donald Trump seem to have proven them right.

This comment was edited on Nov 21, 2016, 18:20.
 
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News Comments > Morning Mobilization
4. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 21, 2016, 11:53 Scottish Martial Arts
 
ItBurn wrote on Nov 21, 2016, 10:47:
I never use apps like the Facebook app or the Youtube app for example. Their websites work great on phones and are full featured. Why would I waste space, cpu, battery and start time with these apps?

A native app gets direct access to system services and has fewer limitations on computing resources and the like. Consequently, a well designed and well optimized native app can offer more features and better performance. However, in most cases a mobile-optimized web app will be "good enough", and likewise assuming that the native app is "well designed and well optimized" is a big jump. Really it's a case by case thing: does the native app offer advantages over the web app? In some cases the answer will be yes, in others no.
 
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News Comments > Saturday Mobilization
4. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 20, 2016, 13:39 Scottish Martial Arts
 
NetHead wrote on Nov 20, 2016, 10:57:
I never understood what people or companies expected from "wearables".

One device (interface/display size allowing) can do everything. So what exactly do they expect the second, third etc devices to be doing.

The short answer is additional sensors.

Consider the GPS on your phone: it's an input source which your desktop PC does not have, and consequently there's a whole host of things which your phone can do which your PC cannot. We're used to thinking of human computer interaction in terms of input devices such as keyboards and mice, but with sensors you get automated input that doesn't directly depend on you doing anything. Wearables at least have the potential to support computer interaction that otherwise isn't possible right now. However, in order to realize those possibilities you need to think less in terms of a screen you explicitly interact with and more in terms of having a computer seamlessly support your daily activities with minimal direct interaction on your part. So far the only genuinely useful application to emerge is fitness and activity tracking but that doesn't mean this is a dead end. It just means there's no killer app yet. Clothing with temperature regulation or augmented reality contact lenses are all possibilities over the course of our lifetimes.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
31. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 18, 2016, 21:20 Scottish Martial Arts
 
I encountered a house centipede in the bathtub for the first time about a month ago. Scared the crap out of me since they're uncommon in this part of California and the most exotic bug I'm used to seeing is a spider. From what I can gather, this variety is completely harmless to humans, but he got sprayed down the drain before I was willing to test that out.  
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
55. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 14, 2016, 20:03 Scottish Martial Arts
 
BA in Classics (Latin and Ancient Greek), and BS in Computer Science.  
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
41. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 14, 2016, 09:37 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Retired wrote on Nov 14, 2016, 07:35:
If you only knew how wrong you are.....

I haven't said one hateful thing, yet because of my political affiliation, it is assumed I hate several groups.....tell me, oh party of "tolerance" that is ripping this nation apart with hate - please educate me on my evil ways.

Look Bats, neither Beamer nor I have accused you of being a bigot. We have accused Trump of being a bigot. Given the easily accessed record of Trump's own words during the campaign the only defense for Trump against that charge is "well, maybe he didn't mean it?" To the extent that we have accused you personally of anything, it's that we think you're too credulous in assuming that Trump doesn't mean what he says or won't follow through on it. Further, we have suggested that perhaps your credulity stems in some small part from the fact that as a middle-aged straight white dude who used to be a cop, you're not on the list of people to be harmed should it turn out that Trump did in fact mean what he repeatedly said. We're not saying you're a bigot, we're saying that perhaps your identity insulates you from how real the fear of Trump genuinely is among those who would be most hurt should he execute his campaign promises.

Now perhaps you're right, perhaps Trump didn't mean anything he said and people are upset unnecessarily. I certainly hope that's the case. But the fact is that no one knows, and Trump isn't taking action to assuage that uncertainty. That's why people are upset and in the streets: it's not hate, it's genuine fear at a very scary unknown.

Finally, if you do not believe that the fear of minority groups is genuine or justified, I would again recommend reading Thucydides. Not because it explains minority fears, but because it shows how fully capable democracies are of tearing themselves apart once basic norms are disregarded and the wrong leaders are in power. I think you are wrong to trust that "the system will prevent it" when we have elected a candidate who campaigned on the promise to blow up that system. In the end, a political system depends upon people abiding by its norms and being committed to its ideals and its defense. Take that away, just like Trump took away the norms of campaigning, and history has shown that very, very bad things tend to result.

This comment was edited on Nov 14, 2016, 09:47.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
35. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 13, 2016, 21:42 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Retired wrote on Nov 13, 2016, 20:38:
At the end of the day the hateful rhetoric must stop. All that crap you guys think Trump will do wont happen. Our system doesnt allow it.

I wish I had your (probably unjustified) faith. A political system is only as good as the actors who inhabit it, and we just elected a very bad actor: a man with no self-control, no policy knowledge or aptitude for learning it, a pattern of scapegoating minorities and of avoiding responsibility, approving comments for authoritarian governments and leaders, etc. A brief survey of the history of democratic governments shows that we are not the first to have picked such a leader, and likewise that the consequences of doing so are rarely good. The founders knew their Greek and Roman history, and they designed the Constitution precisely to avoid an American Alcibiades taking power. We now have our Alcibiades, and if his comments today about immediately deporting 2-3 million people are to be believed, our Sicilian Expedition could be arriving shortly.

More Americans should read Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War in general, but it is particularly apropos after this campaign and this election. Don't see what the fuss about Trump is? Read the history that the Founders knew well and then you might.

This comment was edited on Nov 13, 2016, 21:52.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
31. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 13, 2016, 11:34 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Beamer wrote on Nov 13, 2016, 10:28:
The protestors are about sending two messages:

1) To their friends, family, and loved ones that Trump's rhetoric impacted, that they are still Americans and still have a place in this country. Trump and Pence discussed overturning Roe v Wade, overturning gay marriage, deporting immigrants, creating government lists based upon religion, etc. All the protestors have friends terrified due to these things. Terrified about the rhetoric, terrible that most voters probably overlooked it and didn't get why it was terrifying, and terrified that some were enamored with it. This is a message to those people that they're still Americans, and not all of America feels that way.

2) A message to Trump, that if he tries to do anything to take away civil rights that people spent decades fighting for, it won't go easily.

Well put. Trump's campaign rhetoric frequently wandered into explicitly authoritarian territory ("I alone can fix it"), and his overall campaign theme was one of us vs. them, where "us" frequently seemed to exclude blacks, browns, Muslims, Jews, and gays. That, combined with the fact that many voters found that rhetoric and those themes tolerable, has many ohter people wondering if they still belong in this country, and who will stand up for them if it turns out they don't. That seems like as good a reason as any to be out in the streets.

Edit: Apparently Trump's campaign manager doesn't think it's his responsibility to calm these anxieties. This is going to get worse before it gets better.

This comment was edited on Nov 13, 2016, 11:39.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
29. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 13, 2016, 10:17 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Mr. Tact wrote on Nov 13, 2016, 09:05:
I'm guessing a Trump administration will at best, have a minor decrease (say less than 15%) in deficit spending and debt will almost undoubtedly continue to rise.

His tax plan is conservatively projected to grow the debt by 4-6 trillion over ten years, with less conservative estimates suggesting more on the order of 10 trillion. Toss in the promised infrastructure and defense spending increases, and it's clear that this will be a government that does not care about deficit spending or debts. Which honestly I'm somewhat okay with, at least with regard to, for example, borrowing to spend on infrastructure, but the hypocrisy of a GOP that goes along with it will truly be something to see.
 
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News Comments > Out of the Blue
28. Re: Morning Mobilization Nov 13, 2016, 10:12 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Retired wrote on Nov 13, 2016, 07:50:
I am utterly confused as to those that are wearing the safety pins and worried about their future.

Congratulations on your white penis.

In fairness, you have a point: our system is designed to constrain any one individual's ability to fuck things up. However, most of those systemic constraints depend upon A) the other branches of government providing checks and balances and B) the individual in question actually understanding and respecting those constraints.

With regard to the former, the GOP will control both houses of Congress and soon the Supreme Court. They showed no ability to effectively stand up to Trump during the campaign when, among other things, he proposed a national Muslim registry and withdrawing from NATO; why should we hope they will do so now that Trump has much more power, and much more influence with the voters who determine whether GOP office holders stay in office?

With regard to the latter, legal and democratic institutions depend upon mutual buy-in to be binding. There is no divine mandate that gives the Constitution its authority: it's the fact that we've all agreed to treat it as the supreme law of the land and, in all but the most extreme circumstances, to abide by the law and seek redress through legal, political means. Trump, in contrast, has shown no evidence of actually having read the Constitution, of understanding the principles of limited government laid out in it, or of grasping the values which animate it. This is the guy who was rooting for the Chinese Government at Tienanmen Square after all. Do I trust him to control himself with regard to the Constitutional limits of his office? Nothing in the campaign suggested he can control himself period. Do I trust the GOP to hold him to account if and when he oversteps his bounds? See the former paragraph.

You're right that we all shouldn't overreact. The outcome of this election wasn't democratic (he'll end up with substantially fewer votes), but it was fair and Constitutional, and won under the rules we all agreed to play by. But if Trump does use the powers of his office to harm personal enemies, or if he does create an explicit religious test for entry into the country, or his words and actions do create a climate where anyone who isn't white, straight, and Christian is under a cloud of suspicion and "other"-ness, then the protests occurring now should rightfully get a lot bigger.

This comment was edited on Nov 13, 2016, 10:18.
 
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