User information for Iain Howe

Real Name
Iain Howe
Nickname
Eon
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August 1, 2001
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251 (Amateur)
User ID
10522
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251 Comments. 13 pages. Viewing page 8.
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26.
 
Innovation...
Dec 20, 2001, 07:11
Eon
26.
Innovation... Dec 20, 2001, 07:11
Dec 20, 2001, 07:11
Eon
 
Innovation is not something that gamers of any stripe are reqarding at the moment IMHO.

People want a game like the one they played last time, only better. They're happy to take a little innovation in terms of interface and gameplay, but really they just want a bigger, brighter, better version of Halflife every 6 months.

Eon

31.
 
Looks to me...
Dec 20, 2001, 05:24
Eon
31.
Looks to me... Dec 20, 2001, 05:24
Dec 20, 2001, 05:24
Eon
 
Like you've got a game where one persons driving, and the others shooting, for part of it. Personally I thought that kicked ass in Operation Flashpoint, so why would it suck now?

Not sure about the gameplay though - like most smart people I'll wait 'till I've PLAYED it before I judge it on that!

Eon

86.
 
In response to the response from Macros
Dec 19, 2001, 12:07
Eon
86.
In response to the response from Macros Dec 19, 2001, 12:07
Dec 19, 2001, 12:07
Eon
 
That a lot of people use the same sophistry in their reasoning doesn't make that reasoning any the more valid. Last time I looked a lot of people took hard drugs - life being hard in the Inner Cities isn't valid justification for that. Neither is poverty an excuse for the theft of luxuries (if a mans family is starving I consider anything short of actual murder to be justifiable from his point of view - but that's a different argument).

As to supporting or not supporting certain Publishers - evaluate it on a game by game basis. Publisher B's ishy reputation for support might make me question their new Generic FPS, but it won't make me avoid something I'd wanted for awhile, like Wolfenstein, Morrowind or Civ III for example. But that's MY decision. Having bought it, I say do what the hell you want with it. Crack it, hack it, trainer it - whatever you want. Just don't give it to other people, and DO actually buy it in the first place.

Comparing a game to a car is a ridiculous proposition. You pay tens of thousands for a new car, and you trust your life to it. You pay tens of dollars for a new game, and if it corrupted your DX drivers you'd be counted unlucky.

Better to compare a game to a book, movie or a piece of art. Is that painting of sunflowers worth $14,000,000? Not to me! But someone wanted it at that price! Copying the original would, also, lessen the worth of that original. If he'd painted two, do you think they'd be worth 7,000,000 each? I doubt it. If a Publisher releases 500,000 units of a game, each one of those represents half a millionth of the labour of development, and financial risk of publishing. If L33t H4x0rrs create 450,000 units more, then aren't the originals diluted? "HEY! I didn't have to pay for this - I could just have picked it up for free!"

I actually BOUGHT Ultima Acension - so I know what you're talking about when you bemoan the buggy state of PC releases. Guess what? It didn't work and I took it back. Bought something else in the store. From then on I stuck to Baldur's gate style games for RPG's - outstanding value for money at 200+ hours gameplay.

If you pirated Max Payne, completed it, and bought a legit copy - you're either making a mod or a paragon of the virtues. I congratulate you in either case, but point out that in the Warez scene you stand out like Mother Theresa at a Hitler Youth garden party.

The Government spends its money where it thinks it'll do the most good. Right now Computer Crime is a vast field of untapped opportunity, plenty of big companies are willing to help out, and criminals still don't know how to run through not being chased yet. It won't end piracy, but if you've been making money off software you didn't develop or publish frankly you deserve to go to hell, not jail!

Sorry - you're stealing money off people who worked hard for their bonuses, and the impact on "Returns On Investment" figures means that many more niche titles won't see the light of day. And I don't mean crap games, but games aimed at more specialist markets. Sims for example (Simulations, not The Sims). It shouldn't be about whether it's "an issue" - pop pundits, politicians, pollsters and Spin Merchants talk about issues. I thought we were talking about Right and Wrong, and which side of that line Piracy came? Right and Wrong has damn all to do with politics - that's about the protection of interests. Seems those interests are now being protected more effectively - but Intellectual Property theft hasn't become "more wrong" because of it, it was always wrong.

Get a life? Because I don't like thieves? KEEP a life - don't sell warez to people down the market or mail order and don't run a warez server. Those are the people they're hopefully after - not the people who DL warez. Just be aware of the drugs metaphor that applies here, they may be after the Dealers, but the users are still fair game if they get caught.

(And no, that doesn't make the real bad guys the people making the drugs. To keep the metaphor going, the Industry is producing Prescription drugs through licensed outlets. It's the people stealing those drugs and selling them to addicts who are breaking the law).

By the way, sorry if this makes me somehow "small minded" because I won't change my opinion to support someone elses theft. I guess I DO have a problem seeing the other perspective here.


Eon

81.
 
Re: Piracy
Dec 19, 2001, 07:31
Eon
81.
Re: Piracy Dec 19, 2001, 07:31
Dec 19, 2001, 07:31
Eon
 
It's interesting, because the same arguments are trotted out whenever Piracy is discussed. I'll boil 'em down, I know I'll be over generalising, but I'll trust that those of you on this thread actually worth reasoning with will get the thrust of my point and understand why I've done so.

1. Games are shite.
This is the catchall phrase for concerns such as bugginess and content issues in games. Luckily this is not hard to refute, on the grounds that nobody holds a gun to your head and marches you down to the store. Don't like it? Suspect the Developers will create buggy code that the Publishers won't let/make them fix? Suspect the Publisher is a cheap ass organisation that won't support the game until you conside it to be "fit for the purpose"? Fine. Vote with your wallet and DON'T BUY IT. Just don't steal it, play it for a couple of hundred hours and then whinge about how crap it was, in retrospect.

2. Games are too expensive.
If games were truly too expensive, then Publishers would go out of business and budgets for production would have been slashed. Instead games are targetted at more lucrative audiences and production costs have been raised - price point, on the other hand, really hasn't changed for years. In real terms games have actually got fucking CHEAPER over the last 5 years. Why? Why is $50 the "Magic Number"? Because that's what people are willing to pay for Entertainment Software. Why are most people who aren't whining, snivelling, theiving jackals willing to pay that much? Because on a per hour basis, games are good value for your entertainment money. Get the right game and you'll easily get an hours intensive and reactive entertainment for about 50 cents.

In addition, so long as money is hard to come by, there will be assclowns who want more stuff than they're entitled to. That's why there are anti-theft laws - to prevent them stealing goods and services from those who provide or already own them. Even if games were five for ten dollars there would be some fuckwit talking about how he bought McDonalds for lunch and therefore couldn't afford games - fucking things are overpriced. Stealing the games is easier than stealing most things, or less risky. Hopefully this is changing.

3. It's not real stealing, like stealing a car.
There's this misconception that Piracy is a victimless crime. That's bullshit. When you pirate a game you are stealing something of actual value - the ability to use the game. Most people pay good money for their license, and that money goes to support a vibrant and active community of Publishers, Developers, Stockholders and Customers. That's right CUSTOMERS. If a game makes a lot of money then Publishers are more likely to fund further evolution of the code via Developers. Are more likely to patch issues that arise in order to keep their fan base sweet. Piracy hurts legitimate customers as well as hurting the creators and funders of a product.

4. Piracy helps some products.
Maybe it helps products like Adobe Photoshop, because all the L33t Haxx0rs who go on to become reputable employees will know how to use the product - making it a de facto standard in various industries. Pirating Max Payne, however, won't help anyone at all. Time you guys accepted that.

5. Puts bright young boys behind bars.
Yup. Where they belong. White collar crime is STILL crime. Embezzlement and Fraud is crime. Theft of Intellectual property is a crime. Crime is commited by Criminals, who should rapidly be converted into Defendents and hence to Prisoners. Unfortunately the hit rate for prosecution of Computer crime has been abysmal - so some of those bright boys will suffer until the message gets out that Piracy ain't that bright an option anymore. Then bright boys won't go to jail anymore, only those stupid enough to do it.

6. What about our RIGHTS?
What about the rights of the Developers and Publishers? At the very least their work deserves to be judged on the basis of the code they release, and not on the basis of some hacked about Beta version! Where does it say that you have the right to commit a crime? Your phones can be tapped, your houses can be bugged - why should your email be any more private. Buy a decent encryption program if you want privacy - they aren't going to sweat through hacking that unless they really have a strong suspicion you're doing something wrong.

Bottom line is that Computer Crime is STILL crime. Intellectual Property laws aren't new fangled and they aren't something you have to get used to. You knew it was criminal every day you did it and the only thing you have to get used to is the fact that you can now be caught out doing it.


Eon

48.
 
I wonder...
Dec 14, 2001, 05:44
Eon
48.
I wonder... Dec 14, 2001, 05:44
Dec 14, 2001, 05:44
Eon
 
...how many of the people netted in those operations were thinking "It's not really stealing. I'm above the law. You can't catch me! Compare this software to a car..." when the Feds came through the door.

If 20,000 people pirate the game who would have bought it, then that's 20,000 units worth of profit that the Publisher make gone, and 20,000 units worth of royalties to the Developer gone.

For those who don't know how it works, here's one way in which royalties generally work.

1. Publisher ships units to distributor (and hence to retail).
2. Distributor ships units to retail chains and Indies.
3. Retail stores sell games to End User.
4. Retail pays Distributor for Sold units. Returns unsold units and returns to Distributor.
5. Distributor pays Publisher for Sold units, passes back unsold or returned units, or takes cash to store them for recycling.
6. Publisher takes money for Sold units, takes loss for unsold or returned units, pays royalties into Developer Royalties account.
7. Developer gets Royalty statement - sometimes 90 days after first day of sales - and sees if he's made any money.


Royalty statement equals: Royalties to Date - (Advance + Royalty payouts to date)

Royalties are always a percentage of the profit (to the Publisher) on each unit sold. The Advance is generally quite a heinous sum these days, so it can take quite some time (if ever!) before the Developer actually gets any money for his software.

If you pirate a game that you would have bought, then let's say you're costing the Publisher $20. You are also costing the Developer his royalty - let's say $4. If 100,000 people pirate a game, then that's costing the Developer, directly, $400,000 in real terms. If 10% of that profit was destined for staff bonuses, then you've just cost the hardworking guys and gals who made the game an aggregate of $2667 each. Wave bye bye to those bonuses Developers.

That's the real cost of theft of software to the Industry. On the ficitonal project modelled above, piracy might have cost the Industry $2,000,000 split between the Publisher and the Developer. Capitalism being what it is, that cost is inevitably paid by stockholders and staff, before an attempt to pass it back onto the game playing public.

Nice work boyz...


Eon

3.
 
In other news...
Dec 13, 2001, 07:13
Eon
3.
In other news... Dec 13, 2001, 07:13
Dec 13, 2001, 07:13
Eon
 
Ebay users sign petition requesting bulk discount rate shipping to Australia.

Eon

31.
 
Software Piracy...
Dec 13, 2001, 05:11
Eon
31.
Software Piracy... Dec 13, 2001, 05:11
Dec 13, 2001, 05:11
Eon
 
All I'm saying is, if ANYONE'S going to make money out of a piece of software, how about the guys that worked for three years on it, or the Publishers that risked millions on it?

That's about the whole of my point.

When Developers sign deals, they do so on an advance and royalty basis. Royalty means that for EVERY COPY SOLD the developer gets a few bucks. Development staff are generally not given incredibly high salaries given what skilled artists and programmers could be making in other fields BUT they are generally on good bonus schemes - many of those schemes are profit related.

Therefore every time you pirate a game that you would have bought you are literally stealing money from the pockets of each and every one of the Development team.

And before someone refuses to cry tears for the Ferrari driving mofo's, please remember that the vast majority of the Development community are not Ferrari driving mofo's, and for every dollar you rob John Romero you can COUNT on it that you've shafted 30 - 40 underlings who've done you no wrong.


Eon

10.
 
AVP2
Dec 11, 2001, 08:50
Eon
10.
AVP2 Dec 11, 2001, 08:50
Dec 11, 2001, 08:50
Eon
 
Horses for courses. I personally felt that the graphical engine was clumsy, and that the gameplay was too forced. In places it was nigh on impossible too.

Eon

7.
 
One point to remember...
Dec 11, 2001, 05:17
Eon
7.
One point to remember... Dec 11, 2001, 05:17
Dec 11, 2001, 05:17
Eon
 
...is that, aside from the technology involved, Wolf appears to have got the gameplay right. After having played some gameplay flawed shockers with good graphical tech recently Wolf was a welcome return to tension, excitement and creamy gaming goodness.

MOHAA sure LOOKS good from here, but the real test of it is yet to performed. Looking forward to the demo - and here's hoping for another hit (like Wolf) rather than another miss (like AVP2).

Eon

65.
 
I'm sure that in Britain, at least...
Dec 11, 2001, 05:13
Eon
65.
I'm sure that in Britain, at least... Dec 11, 2001, 05:13
Dec 11, 2001, 05:13
Eon
 
...the idea is that two equal and opposite forces cancel out each other, and whilst they're busy striving to achieve stasis the Civil Service runs the country the same damn way they always have.

Bush is related to our Queen? That certainly gives much more credence to the Nurture rather than Nature camp of child psychology.

Education system. In shambles? I can't speak intelligently about inner city comprehensives, but the Universities seem to be doing well, and the colleges seem to be providing vocational qualifications that'll actually get you a vocation. Hell, my brother actually took a vocational course instead of a degree because he'd had enough of school and wanted to get some skills, and then get some current experience. Doesn't seem to have slowed him up any.


Eon

9.
 
Battlecruiser...
Dec 10, 2001, 09:04
Eon
9.
Battlecruiser... Dec 10, 2001, 09:04
Dec 10, 2001, 09:04
Eon
 
I STILL think a game like that done properly would kick ass... Problem is that Derek's managed to make such a history of failure with the Battlecruiser series that it's queered the pitch for other developers.

I've always been able to avoid the whole BC debacle by simply not going to Derek's site or buying his games. It's actually fairly easy to do, if you find the guy nauseates you THAT much.

Sad to hear he missed the bar again THIS time too... Where DOES his development capital come from (I know HE raises it, but where does he get HIS money from?!)?

Eon

47.
 
Interesting Project Planning premise.
Dec 10, 2001, 09:01
Eon
47.
Interesting Project Planning premise. Dec 10, 2001, 09:01
Dec 10, 2001, 09:01
Eon
 
It's a truism that any project taking over a year or costing more than $1,000,000 will fail.

By fail, I mean will cost more money than scheduled, take more time than scheduled or fail to include the full functionality as designed.

Obviously, by that definition, DNF has already failed a hundred times over!

Will it flop as a game, though? It's hard to see how it can't if it's PC only - let's hope any console SKU's make 3DRealm's money back for them!

Eon

56.
 
Left = Totalitarian
Dec 10, 2001, 08:56
Eon
56.
Left = Totalitarian Dec 10, 2001, 08:56
Dec 10, 2001, 08:56
Eon
 
No such thing as Right Winged totalitarianism? Hitler and Mussolini were left wing then? Only compared to dear old Maggie, maybe...

I do agree that the old Left / Right wing is being replaced by Libertarian Vs. Authoritarian, these days. Most people, I'm sure, believe that a Government should in fact be Centrist, but the best way that we've ever found of getting that is to put all the Libertarian's and Authoritarian's together in a room, and only make law what BOTH SIDES agree is right.

Now HOW did this develop from a simple announcement that Wolfenstein II will follow German law - hardly a big surprise?


Eon

3.
 
Re: Not compatible?
Dec 8, 2001, 08:39
Eon
3.
Re: Not compatible? Dec 8, 2001, 08:39
Dec 8, 2001, 08:39
Eon
 
Thanks for the fucking heads up - it royally screwed my install... (Grrr)

Mind you I AM surprised at the number of things that XP won't work with - seriously considering a backwards compatibility hop - if it wasn't for the usurous price of Operating Systems.


Eon

208.
 
Re: First of all...
Dec 7, 2001, 20:17
Eon
Re: First of all... Dec 7, 2001, 20:17
Dec 7, 2001, 20:17
Eon
 
America? It may be hard to accept, but America was fairly small beer as a colony. As a nation it wasn't great until after the Civil War. America was an unprofitable colony, with a great deal of promise - but it wasn't even part of the "British Empire" at it's height.

At it's height the British Empire encompassed 26% of the entire worlds population. The sun never set. Yadda Yadda Yadda. No - I was referring to African Colonies, India and the rest of the Commonwealth nations. Out of interest, you may not know what the Commonwealth IS, but it's basically open to former Empire members, and under some circumstances those who just want co-prosperity. It's probably about as big as the EU.

First of all, the taxes weren't THAT heavy... I believe the Stamp Duty was a 5% tax. Secondly the legislation was trying to stop traders selling to an ENEMY PROCLAIMED at the time. Fairly justifiable, if you consider modern Economic sanction policies.

As for "Taxation without representation" there wasn't really a model for incorporating far flung colonies into a strictly national government. Call it a technological limitation of the time. It would have been interesting to see how it could have been managed - given the small size and importance of the colonies. In the end, you made it more expensive to keep 'em than to lose them - probably the smartest way of fighting the war.

But the British Empire didn't reach the height of its power until well AFTER the America's were lost.


Eon

200.
 
First of all...
Dec 7, 2001, 12:00
Eon
First of all... Dec 7, 2001, 12:00
Dec 7, 2001, 12:00
Eon
 
The British Empire didn't fall it was dismantled, but it was dismantled over time and by Britain. The nation states it left in its wake have generally been more democratic and prosperous than those that were abandoned by other colonial powers - although there are, I think, exceptions where native dictators seized power. Relations remained so good that some Colonies actually held popular demonstrations requesting that the British stayed, but very few of the major powers actually made money from World War II, and attentions were focussed towards rebuilding our shattered homeland. As for Colonialism itself, aside from the fact that your nation would be Native American if our joint forefathers hadn't been pioneers, I'd think twice about judging ancient actions by modern standards, it becomes all too easy to paint things black or white without understanding the details.

Props to my people in Philly who, it appears, I dissed without cause. Sorry guys - I heard somewhere that Philly had taken the Murder Crown from Detroit, but it seems my source was in error by quite some margin. Ooops!

The lies in number 182's post? Most people who went to found America were poor sons of nobility wanting to take land of their own and those escaping religious persecution. If you knew anything about history you'd know that this has precious little to with the tyranny of Kings and Princes, but more to do with Popes.

And the henious thing that sparked the revolution? Trying to raise sufficient taxes so that the continent of America could pay for its own standing Army. That's why the Second Amendment was such an integral part of the constitution - from what I can work out - because it enabled the creation of a citizen militia, which was cheaper than a conventional standing Army. Of course these days you pay more than enough taxes to afford a standing Army - but then it was more about WHO those taxes were paid to, and WHAT they were spent on rather than whether they were levied at all, wasn't it?

Irregardless, this has nothing to with the issue. I think we can all agree that the parents were primarily at fault. If the law says you can own a gun, then you can't be blamed for owning one.
Would America be a better place without guns? Undoubtedly. Would America be a better place with tougher Anti-Gun laws effective immediately? Unlikely.
Would that kid be alive now if the gun was secured? Of course he would.
Would he still be dead if he didn't play computer games? Eventually.



Eon


This comment was edited on Dec 7, 12:02.
42.
 
In case you missed the point...
Dec 7, 2001, 09:23
Eon
42.
In case you missed the point... Dec 7, 2001, 09:23
Dec 7, 2001, 09:23
Eon
 
...the Germans aren't trying to "cover up" that World War II or the Nazi atrocities every happened. As far as I'm aware it is STILL a requirement that German children in a certain age range take a trip to a Concentration camp each year so that they don't forget.

In fact they probably cover WWII a lot more thoroughly than UK and US schools...

The idea is to utterly ban the use of Nazi symbology in any media, so that the awful power of it can't be dusted off and used again by some other right wing hate monger. The Nazi's were probably one of the first regime's that got into "Spin" and propaganda, and they used it very succesfully on their people - as a result these images still carry a lot of power in Germany, and not entirely negative power either. In a world where the individual feels more and more isolated and helpless in the face of big business and global government, a symbol that promises to empower the masses could still form the basis of a political movement.

So these symbols are banned in ALL media's, from long before computer games were an issue. It's got nothing hiding Nazism, but everything to do with stripping the romantic imagery away from it of Lightning Bolts, Majestic Eagles and so forth and leaving just the statistics and eyewitness accoutns behind to tell the truth.


Eon

185.
 
Hmmmm....
Dec 7, 2001, 09:09
Eon
Hmmmm.... Dec 7, 2001, 09:09
Dec 7, 2001, 09:09
Eon
 
Sun been beating too hard on the back of your neck there, Red?

I'll gladly leave when Blue takes all the news off his board except that which concerns products that are developed, released and constructed entirely in America. Because then it would have all the relevance of your opinion.

Take a good hard look at how much of this news concerns Japanese, French, English, German, Spannish, Australian, Korean, Chinese, Croatian and other countries companies.


Eon

This comment was edited on Dec 7, 09:13.
171.
 
Re: shoulder the blame
Dec 6, 2001, 14:17
Eon
Re: shoulder the blame Dec 6, 2001, 14:17
Dec 6, 2001, 14:17
Eon
 
Car bombings? Even with US funding they haven't been more than a nuisance problem since the mid eighties, thanks. Most of the fuckers who do that stuff are either dead or in jail - although we let a lot out under the peace accords that are trying to solve the basis of these problems. Besides, people in glass houses shouldn't throw stones, the US isn't exactly free of the spectre of international terrorism, is it? Or is your memory too short to think back to the 11th of September?

Severe drought, water shortages? Not sure which city it is that has problems but, like any country, the quality of infrastructure varies from location to location. Must have missed that particular burg's problems. How's the violent crime in Philladelphia, still capping each other at a good old rate? How's the unemployment problem in Detroit, still suffering from the collapse of the domestic automobile industry? How's the Smog in LA, still choking nigh unto death? ...well, I could go on.

The issue of firearms is a bit different from the strictly local issues that each of our countries face. Everytime you have one of these tragedies we have to watch the US media blame everything up to and including the kitchen sink, whilst clearly unqualified people are allowed to own military grade firearms. It's baffling, and very strange that, when you ask WHY do these things happen, you don't like the obvious answer. So you quote those NRA statistics that say guns make life safer, but you don't like other statistics quoted back at you - until somebody usually gets sulky and starts lashing out.

Not big, and not clever. If you want to debate, then debate. If you don't, then don't.

Eon

167.
 
I think the point is...
Dec 6, 2001, 09:11
Eon
I think the point is... Dec 6, 2001, 09:11
Dec 6, 2001, 09:11
Eon
 
...that if you have the equipment you can potentially fill the role. I could never be a masked gunman, because I lack both a mask and a gun. I could source a mask easily enough, but a gun is so difficult for me to get that it is unlikely that, even if I do snap, I'll use one.

In the US it's much more likely that violent crime will revolve (pardon the pun) around firearms abuse - something like 80% of criminal homicides are firearms incidents, as opposed to something like 7% in the UK. Guess THOSE 73% of criminals aren't "just getting guns" are they?

None of which means that banning firearms in the US will solve ANY of those problems - I don't think it will. Guns are too firmly entrenched in the hearts and minds of the people of the US to be removed by simple legislation.

Look at all the things the media finds to blame, when the truth is obviously "Person, unsuited for gun ownership, owns gun".

Eon

251 Comments. 13 pages. Viewing page 8.
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