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Devil May Cry 4 Cries Piracy

GamesIndustry.biz has the latest complaint that piracy has a major impact on PC game sales, quoting Capcom's Christian Svensson as saying the PC edition of Devil May Cry 4 is "getting pirated to hell and back." This comment is somehow connected to his comments about the the supernatural action sequel not being distributed digitally, though how the two points interrelate is not entirely clear (he does stress that Capcom plans to embrace digital distribution for all titles eventually). The extent of this piracy is a little vague as well, as the justification for his comment seems to be how the game "was up on torrents literally the day it shipped," which is probably typical, rather than unusual.

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125. Re: DRM Aug 6, 2008, 16:55 Tumbler
 
Shooting Fish in a Barrel? You're firing blanks because you forgot to answer the most important question, why does the Rental and resale side of console gaming which has been here since the beginning, (i recall renting Nintendo Games all the time), not devastate that industry?

You have your head so far up your ass you can't even smell your own shit anymore. Good riddance.

As for Gametap, it is an interesting service but rarely has new releases. If they would put up games like Bioshock or Crysis I'd likely be using gametap to play PC games.

And it hasn't been a big issue lately not having PC rentals because PC game companies are making so many console versions of their game. I got to play episode 2, Portal, and TF2 on my console by renting it. So in a way I guess PC game companies are supporting rentals...only PC gaming in general will not benefit from it.

As long as PC game companies keep moving to a format I can rent, and boy are they!, then I guess I don't have much to complain about... Prior to this gen of consoles the PC got many games that i wanted to play and there was no way to do this without buying the software at full price. But with the 360 and going forward I'd expect everything on the PC to have a version for the 360. And so far it seems more like the console is the primary goal with the PC as an after thought. A few exceptions but for the most part you can get the vast majority of games on a console. And you can rent.

Hooray!

 
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124. Re: DRM Aug 6, 2008, 16:34 Verno
 
Are you fucking kidding me it's bad? It's why PC games are losing this fight. Cheap easy access to content gets people interested. Those same people would not have the ability to spend any money on your products if that access wasn't there. So better to just get rid of them than setup something that worked for people who don't want to pay full price? WOW!

You can say "fuck" all you want, it doesn't make you anymore intelligent or your arguments any sounder. "Cheap easy access", do you know what consoles cost? Hint: not more than individual games. People can invest in a console and peripherals but without access to rented games then no one would ever sell any? Who are you kidding here?

Your argument is so full of holes I could melt it over a burger and pass it off as cheese. The absence of rentals is the problem with the PC industry, thats basically your entire argument. I know you came up with this "genius" idea by yourself but hint: it sucks. The ultimate irony is that publishers HAVE tried rentals on the PC and it didn't work because of piracy. But I guess they're just all liars according to you! Everyone who works in the industry is a greedy liar out to screw with the world with evil DRM from North Korea but you are the visionary despite never having even worked at Best Buy. I mean, what the hell do they know, they only do it for a living? Those fools!

You want PC gaming rentals? www.gametap.com. That's gaming rentals right there, so I guess the industry is OK now right because we have the same thing that consoles do?

First you said piracy was all publisher lies and that it didn't matter. Now you're saying it does matter and that game rentals are the key to defeating it. Then you said DRM was OK as long you liked it but not OK for whatever invisible judgement you use in your head. You're flipflopping like a politician, it'd be a sight to see if it weren't so transparent. DRM bad! No wait, DRM good for digital distribution. Piracy? Isn't a problem! Wait no it's killing the PC industry along with all of these billions of people renting games!

I mean, I get it, you don't like certain kinds of DRM and think game rentals are the cat's meow but that doesn't make your opinion the revelation that you seem to think it is. There are many problems with the PC gaming industry - shifting hardware targets, cost of entry, piracy, complexity, vendor/manufacturer driver support, lack of overall standardization and so on. Game rentals isn't killing anybody man.
This comment was edited on Aug 6, 16:44.
 
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123. Re: DRM Aug 6, 2008, 16:14 Tumbler
 
Renting is horrible for the industry as is resale, gaming publishers and console makers hate it.

Wow. So the console industry which is quite obviously walking over the PC gaming industry is hurting from all the easy access to content and record breaking sales each year thanx to that resale and rental business you think is bad?

The console industry has had rentals for how long now? And resales?

Are you fucking kidding me it's bad? It's why PC games are losing this fight. Cheap easy access to content gets people interested. Those same people would not have the ability to spend any money on your products if that access wasn't there. So better to just get rid of them than setup something that worked for people who don't want to pay full price? WOW!

You're getting driven out of business a bit more each year by a practice you think is bad, yet it's bringing in record sales and profits for the companies doing it. Yeah it's terrible, console developers might respond but they are all too busy counting their money at the bank.

And your best idea to increase sales is to tighten restrictions...and the more you tighten your grip the more...customers...will slip through your fingers. Heh couldn't resist.

Yeah I'm the one in la la land.

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122. Re: DRM Aug 6, 2008, 15:43 Verno
 

But coming here and telling me that PC games sales are all messed up because everyone is just stealing the game instead of buying it legit is a complete lie. I should know because I'm one of the people not buying the game! (And presumably stealing by the way you think! He doesn't like DRM and doesn't want to buy our game...He's a pirate!)

You ignorant fool.

Wow, could this be any more of a strawman? Your reply has basically nothing to do with anything I said in my post, awesome job. You're entirely off in your own world, making stuff up just to suit some dramatic purpose.

If PC gaming allowed people to rent via online services for all games they have a lot fewer problems.

You really have NO idea what you're talking about. Renting is horrible for the industry as is resale, gaming publishers and console makers hate it. Why would the PC market be any different? You have demos, beta tests, widespread magazine/internet exposure and all that nonsense already. Your big industry saving idea is RENTALS? Rentals and retail resale hurts the gaming industries, they don't help it. One copy being used multiple times, use your head genius. There's a reason all of the big companies have tried to stop it in court multiple times.

Just stop, I am laughing too hard, you're going to hurt me! It's cute in a "I have no understanding of the market" kind of way I guess

Laughing as your titanic goes under little by little. The pirates are sinking the ship! No, it's actually all that water pouring in pulling you under, but keep a look out for those pirates, they'll come back and sink you if you don't protect yourselves!

Uh ok, I guess what you're saying is that you're going to have the last laugh because the industry should get rid of the DRM you personally dislike and adopt game rentals? Somehow I think the rest of us might be having the last laugh.

This comment was edited on Aug 6, 15:44.
 
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121. Re: DRM Aug 6, 2008, 15:24 Tumbler
 
DRM isn't a direct source of revenue you idiot. It doesn't exploit any monies from your wallet unless you're a frustrated pirate who ended up buying Mass Effect because he couldn't wait 8 days for a crack. Cry me a river.

DRM is a direct source of income. That is why they use it. It brings in more money by exploiting paying customers to pay more for the same functionality they got before for free. I must be a frustrated pirate because I want to buy a game, in a store, and play it without proving to anyone that I bought it.

And in case you are confused about what exactly this is, before when you'd buy software you could let friends borrow it, load it and play it anywhere you wanted and in general use it however you like. What has changed is that companies want to watch where you are loading the game and stop you from using it on more than 1 computer. They haven't taken the full steps yet in most cases but we are heading to a place where even loading the game on a 2nd computer will cost you another $60.

People who want software sold in stores in a box to work out of the box are not pirates. They are ex customers. You want to write us off as pirates, great. B-Bye!

But coming here and telling me that PC games sales are all messed up because everyone is just stealing the game instead of buying it legit is a complete lie. I should know because I'm one of the people not buying the game! (And presumably stealing by the way you think! He doesn't like DRM and doesn't want to buy our game...He's a pirate!)

You ignorant fool.

And I mentioned this in a previous post about Game Rentals. I think the major reason PC game developers are feeling the sting is because they will not allow players to see their games without paying full price. It's either $60 or nothing. Console players get the option of renting a game for $5 and playing through it completely and moving on. That is a major deterrent for piracy. If PC gaming allowed people to rent via online services for all games they have a lot fewer problems.

PC Game devs just seem to not understand that consumers will decide what your product is worth and if it's not $50 or $60 they aren't going to follow the rules and buy your shitty product off the store shelf.

The sense of entitlement was mentioned and that is completely the way I feel, how dare PC game companies expect me to pay $50 for that POS. No return policy, no support for you product, and you're going to add more restrictions?

I'm laughing on the sideline here. Laughing as your titanic goes under little by little. The pirates are sinking the ship! No, it's actually all that water pouring in pulling you under, but keep a look out for those pirates, they'll come back and sink you if you don't protect yourselves!

 
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120. Re: DRM Aug 6, 2008, 13:09 Verno
 
To be clear, digital distribution is not an issue for me. I'm happy to deal with stuff like steam when I buy games online. But buying games in a store is totally different.

To be clear, you're saying digital distribution DRM is ok but DRM on store shelf games isn't. Steam has DRM, all of the games you purchase are encrypted and then decrypted before you can play. Plus while it has a barely working Offline mode, for the most part you are tied to an online account to even play your singleplayer games.


DRM IS NOT IN THE PIRATED SOFTWARE!!!!!!!

Whoa, calm down and take your meds dude. Actually DRM is in the pirated software. Cracks just circumvent it in the executable or sometimes remove it but most of the time there is some form of protection still present even in a pirated game.

This is what we already expect from digital distribution and I'm ok with that. But on store shelf software?

Hypocrisy, it's a beautiful thing folks. You can't seem to make up your mind other than "I AM FREAKING OUT BECAUSE I THINK DRM IS BAD, NO NOT THAT DRM, THIS DRM RIGHT HERE!".

I don't see how it can ever NOT be an inconvenience. It's not designed for the consumer, it's designed so the company can keep tabs on who is running the software and make sure people running it are legit. It's Guilty until proven innocent. If you think it's an acceptable compromise I'd say you're too blinded by your devotion to a certain product. I love this game so much that anything that is required of me in order to use said software must also be loved! Give me a fucking break. Wake up already.

And I'd say you're a paranoid blowhard who barely understands the topic material so you rant and rave in caps and try to dramatize the situation. OH NOES MY RIGHTS ARE DISAPPEARING!!!!

DRM is designed to exploit money from you and me. Not pirates. We have the money that companies want and wouldn't it be nice if everyone who wanted to play the game had to make sure it was ok with the company for you to do that.

DRM isn't a direct source of revenue you idiot. It doesn't exploit any monies from your wallet unless you're a frustrated pirate who ended up buying Mass Effect because he couldn't wait 8 days for a crack. Cry me a river.


Does everyone see the baby steps here?

1. CD Checks - First gen DRM - Acceptable, game still runs.
2. Aggressive CD Checks - 2nd Gen DRM - Conflicts with existing software in some cases...? (Software they don't like)
3. Full Blown Spyware - Shit installed on your computer that fucks shit up and won't let you play the game at all in some cases.
4. Online Authentication - Game won't work without permission, but it's only once! (or 2x, or 3x or ...)
5. TRY AND GUESS WHAT IS COMING.

Online authenticaton has been around since Ultima Online. I don't see any full blown spyware now that Starforce is dead. CD-checks are quite reasonable. You seem to have a boner for consumer rights but what about the company's rights? Don't buy their shit if you don't like it. They can whine to the press all they like about piracy, it doesn't force you to buy their products. I hope you'll enjoy all of those DRM-free games in the future because of your unwavering sense of right and wrong. Cheers!

This comment was edited on Aug 6, 13:10.
 
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119. DRM Aug 6, 2008, 12:38 Tumbler
 
I personally don't have a problem with certain kinds of DRM (online account based services, Steam-like game encryption and so on) so long as they are designed with the paying consumer in mind so it's not an inconvenience.

To be clear, digital distribution is not an issue for me. I'm happy to deal with stuff like steam when I buy games online. But buying games in a store is totally different.

I don't see how it can ever NOT be an inconvenience. It's not designed for the consumer, it's designed so the company can keep tabs on who is running the software and make sure people running it are legit. It's Guilty until proven innocent. If you think it's an acceptable compromise I'd say you're too blinded by your devotion to a certain product. I love this game so much that anything that is required of me in order to use said software must also be loved! Give me a fucking break. Wake up already.

Go ahead and alienate all your customers and go after a new generation if that is what you want. (A new core of gamers that feel DRM is normal and just) But everytime I hear a developer or some misguided gamer preaching that DRM is going to protect us all from pirates I want to fucking vomit. Get a fucking brain and do the math. DRM is not in the pirated software. DRM IS NOT IN THE PIRATED SOFTWARE.

DRM IS NOT IN THE PIRATED SOFTWARE!!!!!!!

DRM is designed to exploit money from you and me. Not pirates. We have the money that companies want and wouldn't it be nice if everyone who wanted to play the game had to make sure it was ok with the company for you to do that.


Does everyone see the baby steps here?

1. CD Checks - First gen DRM - Acceptable, game still runs.
2. Aggressive CD Checks - 2nd Gen DRM - Conflicts with existing software in some cases...? (Software they don't like)
3. Full Blown Spyware - Shit installed on your computer that fucks shit up and won't let you play the game at all in some cases.
4. Online Authentication - Game won't work without permission, but it's only once! (or 2x, or 3x or ...)
5. TRY AND GUESS WHAT IS COMING.


Here is a Hint:
Online Authentication All the Time - Everytime you play the game requires online authentication.

Then I'm guessing proprietary software required to run the game which also installs who knows what kind of shit in the background. And then requires it authenticate constantly.

Do you see any problems with this?

This is what we already expect from digital distribution and I'm ok with that. But on store shelf software?

It's all so depressing that anyone would actually defend this practice on software. And maybe no one is, maybe all this (it stops pirates) crap is coming from developers and DRM sales people who will do anything to take your money.

Hopefully sales will continue to fall for companies that do this and rise for companies that don't.

 
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118. Re: BS Aug 5, 2008, 23:16 Verno
 
I'm very curious how they measure it's effectiveness?

I don't know, you'd have to ask them. EA is a good start with Mass Effect if you're so inclined as they reported it to be quite successful. I don't know what their barometer is for success but these companies don't spend money on DRM for nothing. I am not advocating the use of DRM, just stating the reason's why they use it. I use Steam every day and that has DRM, I don't think DRM is inherently an evil thing as long it's designed with accomodating the legitimate user in mind first and foremost. Steam is a great example of that principle applied to DRM.

Because frankly I think saying it's effective is a sales pitch from DRM companies. You just said that they don't intend DRM to thwart piracy, only to protect it during the initial release. But the only measurement I've ever seen referenced for how effective DRM has been is linked to how available it is through pirated sources. Which doesn't make sense.

That's the old way of thinking, when the goal was total prevention. Most publishers have given up on that front and just want to maximize sales during the release period. Publishers did used to think that way and were slow to adapt to changes in overall consumer technology and they paid for it - widespread broadband internet, consumer burners, cheap media, large hard drives and so on. I think they've moved on from the whole "we can stop this!" mentality and are shooting for "lets make it hard to play the entire product but still give them a taste" in the hopes of converting some of those people into sales.

Again, I'm not saying this is right or wrong. I personally don't have a problem with certain kinds of DRM (online account based services, Steam-like game encryption and so on) so long as they are designed with the paying consumer in mind so it's not an inconvenience.

 
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117. Re: BS Aug 5, 2008, 17:45 Tumbler
 
it's proving to be pretty effective there according to publishers.

I'm very curious how they measure it's effectiveness? Because frankly I think saying it's effective is a sales pitch from DRM companies. You just said that they don't intend DRM to thwart piracy, only to protect it during the initial release. But the only measurement I've ever seen referenced for how effective DRM has been is linked to how available it is through pirated sources. Which doesn't make sense.

There is nothing to compare it to because each game is different. I see them claiming that because this game didn't show up on the Torrent sites for 3 days that sales were boosted because of it but there is nothing to compare it against. There is no market that is equal to it and shows sales with the game available on torrent sites.

I suppose daily sales could be used and if the average daily sales drops sharply when the torrent site becomes an option that would support this link. But I've not seen any charts of this, has someone actually released a comparison that has some evidence to support that it's effective?

I don't believe that just because the sales hit a certain level it means DRM is helping. I think as DRM gets more aggressive it catches more legit users and squeezes more people for cash that wouldn't have paid as much in the past.

You talk about DRM like it's protecting something when I see it more of enforcing bullshit rules like you'd find at a cheap ass movie theater. If you want popcorn you have to buy our 13 dollar tub, you can't bring you own. If you want soda you have to buy ours, you can't bring your own.

Thankfully most theaters around me don't care, I can walk in with whatever I want and eat it in peace. I'd happily walk away from any theater that refused to let me see the movie if I wasn't allowed to bring my own food.

And this precisely what I've done with PC gaming. I feel so unwelcome that i don't even bother buying them except on very rare occasions and typically used or clearance in that case.

I don't want to reinstall my OS and have to get clearance to play my game each time I do it.

Developer need to drop the DRM shit. It's way too intrusive. Establish online websites that allow people to register for content updates/patches etc. And support your games. The main reason I don't buy games isn't even DRM, it's their ass-tastic quality. So for you to throw DRM shit at me on top of a smelly turd in a box is just more than I'm willing to pay for. Call me crazy.

 
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116. Re: BS Aug 5, 2008, 14:55 Verno
 
He was just sniping my reply with what suited him. The actual quote said "gamers now expect better graphics, a professionally scripted storyline, professional voice acting and so on". That isn't to say that people only want those things but for every Portal there are a hundred less successful similar games who can't make a buck. Big budget games make big bucks generally, it's just a lot more risky than it used to be. Big budget used to mean a 20 man team and 2 years of time at 2-3 million dollars, now its a 40-50 man team along with a testing department and a 10-20 million dollar budget.

If people want games like Mass Effect, Deus Ex and etc then they have to realize that you can't make games like that on a shoestring budget anymore. You thanked Blizzard and Valve, go ask them what the budget was for their last titles.

I have no doubt developers WANT smaller budgets and smaller teams to produce games more efficiently but I'm not so sure that the market would let them do that anywhere but the Wii.

For the other guy:

DRM is a deterrent to SALES. Not to piracy.

DRM is mainly used now as a tool to protect the product during the initial release periods to maximize sales, it's proving to be pretty effective there according to publishers. They're no longer using DRM to "kill piracy", just to prevent it from being easily accessible for as long as possible. I don't think many average gamers sit there debating buying a product based on DRM or not. You and I are probably not average gamers
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115. Re: BS Aug 5, 2008, 09:55 Paketep
 
I think that there are very few gamers that expect better graphics. I think there are 99.9999% of all publishers and devs who THINK that gamers expect better graphics. Or at least who figure that if they put in better graphics, they don't have to do anything on that irritating "gameplay" front.

And there is a growing number of developers/publishers that think games are better just because they have better graphics. I personally couldn't care less about the graphics (as long as they don't hurt my eyes) if the game is good. I still play loads of 10+ years old games, plus old Spectrum ROMs and MAME games. Most of them are WAY better than much of the drivel that we're getting nowadays.

And now, Willits at id (no less) is saying that "Games that sell over three-and-a-half million copies are not bad games". So, Doom 3 was good just because it had great sales. Fantastic. I sudder thinking about Rage and Doom 4 if that's their attitude.

With these people at the helm of the industry, it's a wonder they haven't destroyed completely the market, and that people still pay them to do what they do. Thank god for Blizzard, Valve, Stardock and the dwindling number of decent developers out there.

 
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114. Re: BS Aug 4, 2008, 20:19 Creston
 
"Oblivion was pretty highly anticipated and advertised as well"

So? Is that somehow unique to Oblivion? What does that have to do with piracy?

"You also forgot that Oblivion was heavily pirated in addition to selling 4 million copies"

I'm not forgetting anything. Publishers and their DRM fanboys will say "If a game doesn't have DRM, it won't sell anything, since everyone will pirate it!"

And Galciv2 has proven that wrong. And Sins of a Solar Empire has proven that wrong. And Oblivion has proven that wrong. And the music industry has proven that wrong. How many more examples do you need?

DRM is a deterrent to SALES. Not to piracy.

"The trouble with trimming development costs is that gamers expect better graphics"

I think that there are very few gamers that expect better graphics. I think there are 99.9999% of all publishers and devs who THINK that gamers expect better graphics. Or at least who figure that if they put in better graphics, they don't have to do anything on that irritating "gameplay" front.

Creston

 
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113. No subject Aug 4, 2008, 17:52 dryden555
 
The only proven way to hinder console piracy is intentionally change the console in some internal way every couple of years, which is exactly what Sony did with the PS2 and MS did with the XBOX1. It didnt stop piracy but it slowed it down quite a bit until a new crack hit the scene. This is why I suspect Nintendo is soon to release a "new" DS with a wider screen. Its not just about the new screen: it will stop the R4 (which is now found everywhere) crack from working on the new model DS units.

 
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112. Re: BS Aug 4, 2008, 12:12 Tumbler
 
agreed -- Console piracy is rampant yet it gets virtually no acknowledgement from game companies via the usual gaming news outlets. This is part of the reason I dont take the "piracy is killing PC games" seriously. Something is fishy.

I wouldn't think console developers stand to gain anything when talking about console piracy. What more can you do to make the console a more secure platform? It's already so locked down that unless someone wants to "hack" into it, you can't make it do anything that the creator does not intend you to do.

You can't burn CD's, copy files, or load CD cracks on consoles so most users, I'm guessing, don't bother because it's such a major change in order to use pirated console stuff.

If I wanted to start using pirated console software I think I'd have to invest in another console and hack it. I'm guessing that would run me approx $400 or more to get a working hacked console.

Or I could just rent games for $20 a month and still play all the games that come out and play them online with no hassles.

Hmm, you know come to think of it, rentals are probably a extremely effective way to fight piracy. Because if I didn't have the option of renting all the games I wanted to play I'd either have to pay $60 per game (a practice that has CEASED ALMOST COMPLETELY) or pirate the games and play the single player games for the most part.

And with only these 2 options I might choose to not own a console at all.

Having a rental program for your content enables people who are unwilling to pay full price your products to still pay you something. Because if they turn to piracy then you get nothing.

So, PC gaming needs Rentals! That is how you cut down on piracy! Get to work devs. Give people a way to play your games for a few bucks per person! (assuming your take on the rental fee will equal approx that)

Somehow I think PC game developers will choose not to establish a rental system and will continue to use DRM software to try and lock down their software so that only people who pay them full price can play their content.

Good luck with that. You've been REALLY bad at it so far but I'm sure everything will change eventually.

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111. Re: BS Aug 4, 2008, 11:47 dryden555
 
agreed -- Console piracy is rampant yet it gets virtually no acknowledgement from game companies via the usual gaming news outlets. This is part of the reason I dont take the "piracy is killing PC games" seriously. Something is fishy.

 
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110. Re: BS Aug 3, 2008, 21:22 Tumbler
 
People aren't going to the console market due to piracy, they are going to the console market because players are more willing to pay more for a lower quality product.

It's a bit more complex than that but console gamers do pay more for less complex products.

It's all about the barriers to entry. $300-$600 dollars will attract a lot more people than $1000+ PC's. Add to this the convenience of using the consoles on your big screen TV's and Stereo's and you get a much more attractive product to the average consumer. Instead of trying to market your game to 5 million people, you're trying to market it to 50 million.

As for Piracy and PC games, I see a terrible drop in quality of PC games over the past few years so it makes perfect sense to me that retail sales are falling for many titles.

It's so rare to see a great game come out anymore. It feels like everyone is just making sequels, spin offs or clones. It's like handing in someone else's term paper and expecting to get a good grade for it. Shame on you. Quit claiming to work so hard on these games when you're just copying someone else's ideas.

Start taking some risks and you'll get customers stepping up to pay. Play it safe and you'll keep bitching about piracy.
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109. Re: BS Aug 3, 2008, 15:29 Warskull
 
The reason so many devs are going console only is because it is an easier market. Mediocre games get praised as the greatest game ever on consoles. It is easier to churn out shovelware or mediocre games and sell them on consoles. Consoles are "cool" now so there are many more people playing them. The market is larger and less informed. PC gamers not only go to main stream review sites (the ones that give everything a 7-9), but also go to more viscous gaming blogs and word gets out that a game sucks much faster. On consoles you can make Madden 2kX every year and sell it for $50 quite successfully. Furthermore console players are more single player focused and thus more consumptive. They beat the game and then look for a new one, they don't continue to play the multiplayer modes for long periods of time like you see with PC games.

People aren't going to the console market due to piracy, they are going to the console market because players are more willing to pay more for a lower quality product.

 
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108. Re: BS Aug 3, 2008, 07:58 Kajetan
 
Y'know it's funny nobody in the industry notes that console titles are getting pirated as well.

They know, but at the moment, there is no benefit in using console piracy as a scapegoat. You can be sure, that they WILL use it, when the business is not developing in the way, they like.

It is no coincidence, that Nintendo goes NOW after chips like the R4 and not all the last two years before. Because NOW hardware sales of the DS in Japan are dropping nearly 50% in relation to last year. Yes, software sales are still going up, but Nintendo has to do something to please the investors.

Or ... Nintendo is using the media outrage to fuel DS sales, because more people notice now, that you can play copies on the DS


 
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107. Re: BS Aug 2, 2008, 18:33 Tanto Edge
 
Y'know it's funny nobody in the industry notes that console titles are getting pirated as well.  
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=705LEH3j2g0&t=0m24s
http://www.youtube.com/user/tantoedge
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106. No subject Aug 2, 2008, 08:39 dryden555
 
Few PC gamers want to play that game, even if it was free to download. Svensson is nuts.

 
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