Send News. Want a reply? Read this. More in the FAQ.   News Forum - All Forums - Mobile - PDA - RSS Headlines  RSS Headlines   Twitter  Twitter
Customize
User Settings
Styles:
LAN Parties
Upcoming one-time events:

Regularly scheduled events

Sunday Tech Bits

View
23 Replies. 2 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 ] Older >

23. Re: No subject Jan 16, 2006, 20:45 Orogogus
 
Leap ahead/forward is still a basic idiom with a positive connotation, famine and death notwithstanding. It's not the same as using "Great Depression" as a marketing slogan. Whereas "X inside" doesn't mean anything at all outside the literal meaning.

Going on about translation difficulties is meaningless when the "Intel Inside" slogan doesn't have any meaning outside of English, where it has 1) assonance and 2) iambic meter (in-TEL in-SIDE) working for it. "Leap ahead", on the other hand, is a concept much more likely to have a metaphorical counterpart in other languages.

The point about the extra word is that "Intel Inside" isn't a complete phrase; it's a fragment with, at the very least, an implied indefinite article, verb and object. If you assume "Leap ahead" is using the imperative tense, then it represents a complete sentence in a wide range of languages, lacking only the subject which is omitted in many both Latin and non-Latin-based languages.

Further, the company I work for is much, much smaller than Intel, and we don't agonize over clipping word counts down to their absolute bare minimums before sending materials out for translation. It's a problem you can solve by spending money on it, and Intel can afford to pay secondary, tertiary and quaternary translators - entire offices, in all likelihood - to make sure they don't trademark gibberish. This fixation is a total non-starter.

 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
22. No subject Jan 16, 2006, 20:16 Dev
 
Riiight. Great leap forward is a great idiom in chinese to be associated with.
NOT!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_leap_forward

"The Great Leap Forward is now widely seen both within China and outside as a major economic disaster. As inflated statistics reached planning authorities, orders were given to divert human resources into industry rather than agriculture. Various sources now put the death toll somewhere between 25 and 60 million people, with the majority of the deaths owed to starvation. The three years between 1959 and 1962 were known as the "Three Bitter Years," the Three Years of Natural Disasters (although this name is now rarely used in China), and the Great Leap Famine, as the Chinese people suffered from extreme shortages of food. It is believed by some to have been the greatest famine in history."


BTW, if you look at the wording of what I said, I was referring to inside being a single word in english. I didn't say anything about how many words it was in other languages.
This comment was edited on Jan 16, 20:17.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
21. Re: No subject Jan 16, 2006, 19:15 Orogogus
 
"intel inside" only needs A SINGLE WORD to be translated.

"Leap ahead" requires two words, a phrase, to be translated.

In Chinese, at least, it doesn't parse without a verb thrown in, and it obviously loses the assonance. And idiomatically, "leap ahead" works much, much better than "An Intel is inside" (c.f. "Great Leap Forward" vs., I really don't know, "The car is in the garage").

 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
20. No subject Jan 16, 2006, 14:19 Dev
 
nin: And thats why this is a bad, unthought out move

They said they were spending something like $2.5 billion on this move. So if thats how little time they spent discussing...

This comment was edited on Jan 16, 18:24.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
19. Re: No subject Jan 16, 2006, 14:15 nin
 

I think the two of you have spent far more time on this than Intel's PR dept...



--------------------------------------------------------------
GW: Nilaar Madalla, lvl 20 R/Mo / Tolyl Nor, lvl 20 E/Mo / Xylos Gath, lvl 13 W/Mo

http://www.goldfrapp.co.uk/
 
http://www.nin.com/pub/tension/
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
18. No subject Jan 16, 2006, 14:14 Dev
 
I'm talking about the phrasing, not the graphics.
"intel inside" only needs A SINGLE WORD to be translated.

"Leap ahead" requires two words, a phrase, to be translated.

There's ALWAYS going to be more possabilities for translation problems with a phrase than a single word.


And your last point isn't true. They required companies to refer to them as "Intel Pentium D 840" in advertising. Not just pentium D 840.

Feel free to refer to dells page and see.
Examples:
"Processor
IntelŪ PentiumŪ D Processor with Dual Core Technology up to 840 "
"IntelŪ PentiumŪ 4 Processor 630 w/HT Technology"
In all cases they mention intel AS WELL AS pentium. However, shortly they will have to leave the pentium part off.
You can already see the first steps of that change here:
http://www1.us.dell.com/content/products/compare.aspx/desktops?c=us&cs=19&l=en&s=dhs&~ck=mn Where at the top they dont mention pentium.
This comment was edited on Jan 16, 14:19.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
17. Re: No subject Jan 16, 2006, 13:52 Zathrus
 
No I'm not a language scholar. But then I dont need to be. I have logic.

And this is exactly the same "logic" that has lead to massive PR blunders in various countries for several decades now. Even if you don't have to translate to a foreign language, idioms can cause huge blunders (c.f. -- Wendy's "hot and juicy" marketing campaign in Australia).

Logically, any logo which has built in company recognization should be superior to one that does not.

Are you missing the huge freaking "intel" in a blue circle that's the majority of the new logo?

And they're rebranding all of their CPUs to inherently include the company name. Instead of "Pentium D840" its now "Intel D840".

 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
16. No subject Jan 16, 2006, 13:24 Dev
 
No I'm not a language scholar. But then I dont need to be in this situation. I have logic.

Lets analyze this one word at a time
"intel"
Well that doesn't need translation its a company name. Unless some country has a thing like Vic's vapor-rub, in germany they translate the Vic to be spelled as Wic's because the V makes an F sound, and a "fic" sound is a profanity in german. I noticed that oddity when I was living in germany. Aside from rare things like that, no translation should be nessasary, and intel is a longer word anyway, so it should have less potential for that than using a 3 letter word.

"inside"
I'm 99% sure that pretty much every language has some sort of word for "inside" or an equivalent.
"intel inside" conveys the idea that inside your computer you have an intel brand cpu. Its contained in the two words of the logo. Its obvious. Regardless of language. Its a great global phrase.

"leap ahead"
As you say, I'm not a language scholar. So I wont attempt much here. Beyond the fact that it doesn't mention intel, so its not obvious from the two words of the logo phrase itself what company made your cpu. Hence this logo is inferior to the first one. It doesn't have as much built in (or in fact any) brand recognization.

Logically, any logo which has built in company recognization should be superior to one that does not.
Why? Because company/brand recognization is one of the goals in marketing.
This comment was edited on Jan 16, 13:50.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
15. Re: No subject Jan 16, 2006, 13:20 Zathrus
 
Ok, but what do you think about them changing from "Intel inside" to "leap ahead" ?

I already said I preferred the old logo, but that's typical. People tend to prefer the old style. In a few years it'll seem like the normal one.

And then trying to convince people that 2006 is a leap year

You're grasping at straws. As Enahs said, it's a marketing slogan, nothing more.

I can claim that my new product will "start a whole new millenium" or introduce "a new age" or other crap, but that doesn't mean I'm actually trying to restructure the calendar as we know it.

As I said earlier, "intel inside" is obvious globally and in any language.

So you're a language scholar now? Just how many languages do you know to the point of comprehending idioms? How do you know that "Intel Inside" wouldn't translate into sexual innuendo in Mandarian Chinese? Or Indian? Or Arabic?

You don't like the logo. That's fine. Neither do I. But you're honestly sounding like one of the Mac zealots who's lamenting the name "MacBook Pro" instead of "PowerBook". It just doesn't matter.

 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
14. Re: No subject Jan 16, 2006, 13:09 nin
 
Oh yeah?
http://www.intel.com/intel/vision/
"Why 2006 will be a leap year"

Damn, that's an ugly logo they went to...

--------------------------------------------------------------
GW: Nilaar Madalla, lvl 20 R/Mo / Tolyl Nor, lvl 20 E/Mo / Xylos Gath, lvl 13 W/Mo

http://www.goldfrapp.co.uk/
 
http://www.nin.com/pub/tension/
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
13. No subject Jan 16, 2006, 12:59 Dev
 
Oh yeah?
http://www.intel.com/intel/vision/
"Why 2006 will be a leap year"

 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
12. Re: No subject Jan 16, 2006, 12:58 Enahs
 
And then trying to convince people that 2006 is a leap year.


That was just a catchphrase or a slogan, a marketing ploy. They are not trying to change the calendar.


http://www.frappr.com/bluesnewsmembers
Show me where you live! I promise it will only hurt the first time.
 
Avatar 15513
 
I am free of all prejudice. I hate everyone equally.
- W. C. Fields
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
11. No subject Jan 16, 2006, 12:53 Dev
 
Ok, but what do you think about them changing from "Intel inside" to "leap ahead" ? And then trying to convince people that 2006 is a leap year.

As I said earlier, "intel inside" is obvious globally and in any language. "leap ahead" I cant wait to see what that translates to, and it doesn't have any built in brand identification.
This comment was edited on Jan 16, 12:59.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
10. Re: No subject Jan 16, 2006, 12:46 Zathrus
 
I can't see how "leap ahead" is similar to "intel inside" though.

I'm talking about the log itself. It's still blue, has a circular motif with similar styling (excepting the font). The major difference is that "Intel" is more prominant than previously. I prefer the old logo myself, but that's rather typical.

no viable 64 bit strategy yet

They're adopting x86-64. It's already in a number of chips. They're just dragging their feet on it -- but it's already clear that there's no real option here. I guess Intel could market their own 64-bit alternative while sticking with x86, but they'd face a huge resistance to that from the market since there's already an established 64-bit x86 ISA out there that's proven and capable. If Intel had really wanted to do that, then they should never have but x86-64 in any of their CPUs in the first place.

As for mis-steps -- I don't see this as one. They've made a ton in recent years (starting with Rambus), but this isn't a huge change in the grand scheme of things. Companies change their marketing campaigns all the time, and generally it makes little difference in the long run.

The move off Netburst, abandoning Itanium, and moving toward a Pentium M-like architecture are all far, far bigger steps, and they're all smart ones IMO. The criticism I'd give there is that they took too long for each one, but that's easy to see in hindsight.

 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
9. No subject Jan 16, 2006, 12:21 Dev
 
I can't see how "leap ahead" is similar to "intel inside" though.

I just think its another stupid decision for intel on top of a whole lot of them that have resulted in canceled products, recalls of chipsets, cpu's and more, and no viable 64 bit strategy yet, etc etc. What I see is AMD climbing and constantly gaining market share (even outselling intel in desktop retail sales for 2 consectitive months late last year), and intel constantly making misteps. I think this is another mistep.

BTW, I agree about the digg links, I want the frigging link to the actual story, not a link to some blog with 1 line of text about it, and that line is the link to the story.
This comment was edited on Jan 16, 12:33.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
8. Re: No subject Jan 16, 2006, 09:30 Zathrus
 
So explain to me again how I am supposed to tell people to ONLY buy a pentium M (M for mobile) chip for laptop, nothing else?

Uh, tell them to buy a laptop with Centrino stickers all over it? Intel's keeping that particular branding, although now it's changing to use the new Core chips (as Rolphus mentioned).

AMD doesn't have very good lappie chips

I thought the Turion64 was supposed to be an excellent laptop chip. I don't keep up with laptop chipsets though.

Am I supposed to say to my grandma: Get the "intel M" and expect them to remember that?

And you expected her to remember "Pentium M" instead? Please. That's a completely inane arguement -- frankly, I suspect she'd have less of a problem remembering "Intel M" or just "Intel" than "Pentium" anything.

Whats really funny is how they've had to go to model numbers instead of mhz

And they realized this shortly after lambasting AMD over doing the same thing -- since they quickly realized that the Netburst architecture had hit a wall.

But intel's model numbers aren't sorted into any sensical pattern, a higher number could be a lower speed, etc.

Agreed. This is silly of them. It's going to hurt in the long run. AMD's system doesn't guarantee that processor X will be clocked higher than processor Y, but it does say that X should be faster than Y for most cases -- and so far they've followed that.

Honestly, I don't know why you're so wound up about this. They're keeping a logo that's very similar to the old "Intel Inside" one, and that's the most recognizable branding. And it's a very smart decision to further push your company name as the brand, rather than a particular product name as the brand. The former is unlikely to change, the latter is very likely.


Edit: I presume you're the "Devistater" that got the story in question on /.
This comment was edited on Jan 16, 09:40.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
7. Re: Firefox (Optimus keyboard) Jan 16, 2006, 07:36 Devster
 
Stupid "digg" links. Stop sending those in, Ant.

Not a fan of the linking to a site just so I have to go to yet another site to find out WTF they are actually talking about. If they wrote anything of substance about their posting of a link, I could see giving them credit, but when the whole 'article' is the link and This is the 'good things come in small packages' idea., well, WTF is the point.

Use your head, don't lose it - Don't feed the trolls!
 
Avatar 1066
 
Use your head, don't lose it - Don't feed the trolls!
Boycott Belligerent Boycotters!
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
6. Re: No subject Jan 16, 2006, 05:23 Rolphus
 
Intel's new laptop platform is (rather snappily, I think) titled Core Duo for dual-core "Yonah" CPUs and Core Solo for single-core "Yonah" CPUs. The mobile systems themselves are called Centrino Duo for a Core Duo chip with some other bits and pieces (mobile 955 chipset, Intel A/B/G wi-fi system), and Centrino with Core Solo for a Core Solo chip with the same chipset and wireless capabilities.

Essentially, Intel are pushing the platform as a brand more than the CPU itself.

 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
5. Re: No subject Jan 15, 2006, 23:23 Dev
 
So explain to me again how I am supposed to tell people to ONLY buy a pentium M (M for mobile) chip for laptop, nothing else? AMD doesn't have very good lappie chips, and a normal intel pentium 4 with nut scorching temps with a 30 min battery life.

Am I supposed to say to my grandma: Get the "intel M" and expect them to remember that?

They could have said the next generation stuff is pentium 5. Kinda like nvidia has used the geforce name for a while. Whats really funny is how they've had to go to model numbers instead of mhz (after critisising AMD for model numbers) because they are bringing the pentium M technology back to desktop to replace the melting mobo hotness of pentium 4, and pure MHZ wont matter anymore. But intel's model numbers aren't sorted into any sensical pattern, a higher number could be a lower speed, etc.

Its funny too, intel is trying to convince people that 2006 is a leap year: http://www.intel.com/intel/vision/
This comment was edited on Jan 16, 00:22.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
4. Re: No subject Jan 15, 2006, 23:14 Zadillo
 
To be fair, even though most consumers especially didn't even know what Pentium meant (as a brand name instead of 586), I think Intel probably did realize that as a brand name it was getting long in the tooth and meaningless. You can only do so many things to the Pentium name (Pentium Pro, Pentium D, Pentium M, etc.).

 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
23 Replies. 2 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 ] Older >


footer

.. .. ..

Blue's News logo