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7. Re: 120,000,000 FPS Oct 30, 2005, 21:28 Razor6
 
A quick program, the x position changes constantly in the background while the four boxes refresh to the current position every 30th, 60th, 90th and in realtime. The combo box lets you change the background update speed. Yes it takes 100% CPU but the thread doing that is low priority.

http://home.houston.rr.com/epoh/razor6/refresh.exe
This comment was edited on Oct 30, 21:30.
 
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6. Re: 120,000,000 FPS Oct 30, 2005, 15:12 Tango
 
FPS doesn't bother me, but refresh rates on monitors and tvs do enormously. Sub-85Hz makes my eyes water after a couple of hours.

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5. Re: 120,000,000 FPS Oct 30, 2005, 01:47 Ray Marden
 
Not true.

Perhaps one of the other, more productive :), posters can provide all the links showing that people can tell the difference.

I am particularly sensitive to it, myself.

I hate playing games with v-sync disabled; the whole thing looks/moves terrible.
I know, not framerate, but stressing my sensitivity.
Things do not look "ok" to me until they are at least 30 FPS.

I do find it uncomfortable watching movies at the theater given their low framerate and enlarged sized (and, no, not just talking about Bourne movies ;).)

In games, things do not look good to me until they hit 60FPS+.

In games, things do not look "solid" to me until they are running at 100+FPS.

Further, things like sync/progressive scan and blue do have an affect on how the picture is perceived.

I do think it varies and the general, untrained eye will not be as picky as some (myself,) but I can tell the general difference between framerates and watching movies in the theater really gets on my nerves.
I'm not crazy! Well, not about this, I mean!
Speaking primarily for myself,
Ray

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I love you, mom.
 
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Everything is awesome!!!
http://shoutengine.com/GarnettonGames/
I love you, mom.
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4. Re: 120,000,000 FPS Oct 29, 2005, 23:56 John
 
C'mon, you guys know its just more of Sony trying to over-hype the PS3 to distract people from the 360. Its surely going to continue for a while after the 360 is released.

GW: Grad Mcgarth W/N Going to finish game before I start a new character me thinks
 
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3. Re: 120,000,000 FPS Oct 29, 2005, 22:49 FourPak
 
yes this is a tired old argument, nnn Frames/Sec,
despite arguments to the contrary it's been proven that in a darkened room with no flourescents, humans CANNOT distinguish between 30, 60, 70, 75, 10000 frames/sec.

Years ago film makers discovered that anything more
than 30 fps is a blur to the human eye and brain.

Yet despite these facts, people will argue violently that They can "tell the difference" between 60 and 70 and 75 fps refresh on monitors and games, yet when they are put in a darkened room and TESTED they can't pick the difference.

 
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2. Re: 120 FPS Oct 29, 2005, 21:35 Fantaz
 
Sure we can use it with DVI/HDMI cables that connect to LCD/CRT monitors. But hey, maybe Sony will release a new TV model with a 120 hertz refresh rate? Then they can use that to their advantage when marketing their TV & PS3 combo.

 
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1. 120 FPS Oct 29, 2005, 17:16 Chris
 

Technology no one can use (1), no one will be able to use in the forseeable future (2), and pointless even if someone could use it(3)! Awesome.

(1) Current HDTV standards are 60 hertz.
(2) Even 1080P, which no broadcaster has on the horizon, is 60 hertz.
(3) There are severe diminishing returns to frame rates beyond about 30 and human vision is incapable of differentiating frame rates much beyond twice that.

 
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