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14. Re: bits Jan 10, 2014, 11:25 harlock
 
mag wrote on Jan 10, 2014, 01:26:
If 90% of the target market (e.g. desktop/laptop/actual computers running Windows, MacOS, or Linux) is Intel, you're probably not going to completely change the way you code to make stuff faster on AMD.

its not an all or nothing proposition.. you have to think of this realistically and practically rather than abstract absolutes

there could be partial adoption, or the tech might get cloned, etc.

i have no interest in the AMD vs intel argument.. i buy intel myself, because i use a bunch of multimedia software that is optimized for it.. but i could care less who is "on top"

the main thing is the concept.. i think ultimately the future of computers is going this way (and away from discrete processors), someone has to make mistakes so they can make progress, and i think its a good thing someone is still pursuing it
 
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13. Re: Evening Tech Bits Jan 10, 2014, 09:10 Pigeon
 
nin wrote on Jan 9, 2014, 18:12:
jdreyer wrote on Jan 9, 2014, 18:06:
Forget 4K TVs: Most Americans still own a VCR.

I own one. Doesn't mean it's plugged in.

Also, interesting tidbit. I have a friend who's a librarian. She says that a VHS tape lasts about 600 rentals before it degrades to the point where they have to replace it. For discs, it's only 100 rentals.


I can't speak for your friends experience, but (I would think) it's a lot easier to damage a dvd than it is to damage a vhs cassette, based on the way the tape is largely protected by the external case.



Judging by the quality of some rental DVDs I'm pretty sure people use them as handkerchiefs and then clean them off with sandpaper. I've cleaned more than a few to get them to work properly, or simply because I'm afraid my DVD player might get electronic herpes from them.
 
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12. Re: Evening Tech Bits Jan 10, 2014, 08:19 gray
 
nin wrote on Jan 9, 2014, 18:12:
jdreyer wrote on Jan 9, 2014, 18:06:
Forget 4K TVs: Most Americans still own a VCR.

I own one. Doesn't mean it's plugged in.

Also, interesting tidbit. I have a friend who's a librarian. She says that a VHS tape lasts about 600 rentals before it degrades to the point where they have to replace it. For discs, it's only 100 rentals.


I can't speak for your friends experience, but (I would think) it's a lot easier to damage a dvd than it is to damage a vhs cassette, based on the way the tape is largely protected by the external case.


Hah, that takes me back to when the first CD Drives used to use these beauties.
 
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11. Re: bits Jan 10, 2014, 01:26 mag
 
harlock wrote on Jan 9, 2014, 23:29:
mag wrote on Jan 9, 2014, 22:46:
and it could completely come to pass that this is completely ignored by developers since it doesn't work for Intel or nvidia.

To reach beyond mere niche adoption, it is essential to provide a deployment path beyond the realm of any single hardware vendor. The ultimate goal for software developers is “write once, run everywhere” which requires a unified install-base across all platforms and devices. This is the HSA vision. Thus, the HSA Foundation (HSAF) was formed as an open industry standards body to unify the computing industry around a common approach.The founding members of HSA are: AMD, ARM, Imagination Technologies, MediaTek, Texas Instruments, Samsung Electronics and Qualcomm


that doesnt sound "completely ignored" to me... and im not sure where you get the idea it wont work with intel - read the link if you really want to know more

I like AMD. I want this to succeed. I haven't purchased a desktop Intel processor since... the p166MMX. I'm just being realistic. It is an enormous hurdle to make this completely programmer-agnostic. You have to write a compiler that can intelligently offload massively-parallelizable calculations to the GPU, and that is ridiculously hard, or else it'd have been done already. As is, they're presenting it as 'extensions' to C++, and it is still going to require programmers to intentionally write things in a way that will be able to take advantage of it.

If 90% of the target market (e.g. desktop/laptop/actual computers running Windows, MacOS, or Linux) is Intel, you're probably not going to completely change the way you code to make stuff faster on AMD.
 
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10. Re: Evening Tech Bits Jan 10, 2014, 00:07 JeffD
 
jdrey, not surprising, I never lend out my dvd-rw's cause they are so soft. Need to take care of your dvd's and they will take care of you.

I'm in the same boat, there is a vcr in my house, and it may be plugged in, but it never gets used. Kind of a useless factoid.
 
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9. Re: bits Jan 9, 2014, 23:29 harlock
 
mag wrote on Jan 9, 2014, 22:46:
and it could completely come to pass that this is completely ignored by developers since it doesn't work for Intel or nvidia.

To reach beyond mere niche adoption, it is essential to provide a deployment path beyond the realm of any single hardware vendor. The ultimate goal for software developers is “write once, run everywhere” which requires a unified install-base across all platforms and devices. This is the HSA vision. Thus, the HSA Foundation (HSAF) was formed as an open industry standards body to unify the computing industry around a common approach.The founding members of HSA are: AMD, ARM, Imagination Technologies, MediaTek, Texas Instruments, Samsung Electronics and Qualcomm


that doesnt sound "completely ignored" to me... and im not sure where you get the idea it wont work with intel - read the link if you really want to know more
 
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8. Re: bits Jan 9, 2014, 22:46 mag
 
HorrorScope wrote on Jan 9, 2014, 21:25:
harlock wrote on Jan 9, 2014, 18:57:
AMD’s most powerful APUs ever, the AMD A10 7850K and 7700K (codenamed “Kaveri”), are now shipping and will be on shelves in desktops early next week, with pre-orders starting today from select system builders. “Kaveri” is the world’s first APU to include Heterogeneous System Architecture (HSA) features, the immersive sound of AMD TrueAudio Technology and the performance gaming experiences of Mantle API. “Kaveri”-based notebooks will be available in the first half of this year.

HSA

To fully exploit the capabilities of parallel execution units, it is essential for computer system designers to think differently. The designers must re-architect computer systems to tightly integrate the disparate compute elements on a platform into an evolved central processor while providing a programming path that does not require fundamental changes for software developers. This is the primary goal of the new HSA design.

HSA creates an improved processor design that exposes the benefits and capabilities of mainstream programmable compute elements, working together seamlessly. With HSA, applications can create data structures in a single unified address space and can initiate work items on the hardware most appropriate for a given task. Sharing data between compute elements is as simple as sending a pointer. Multiple compute tasks can work on the same coherent memory regions, utilizing barriers and atomic memory operations as needed to maintain data synchronization (just as multi-core CPUs do today).

The HSA team at AMD analyzed the performance of Haar Face Detect, a commonly used multi-stage video analysis algorithm used to identify faces in a video stream. The team compared a CPU/GPU implementation in OpenCL™ against an HSA implementation. The HSA version seamlessly shares data between CPU and GPU, without memory copies or cache flushes because it assigns each part of the workload to the most appropriate processor with minimal dispatch overhead. The net result was a 2.3x relative performance gain at a 2.4x reduced power level*. This level of performance is not possible using only multicore CPU, only GPU, or even combined CPU and GPU with today’s driver model. Just as important, it is done using simple extensions to C++, not a totally different programming model.

Time to invest?

Risky bet. AMD's hurting pretty badly, and it could completely come to pass that this is completely ignored by developers since it doesn't work for Intel or nvidia. This is kinda what they've been hanging their hopes on for the past five years of shitty processors. This is what they've been building towards. And if it doesn't work...
 
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7. Re: Evening Tech Bits Jan 9, 2014, 21:55 Ozmodan
 
It is NBC, they still think the cold war is active. About their standard quality of news reporting.

I think there is a VCR down in the basement gathering dust, if that is what they are attempting to prove. Even my 96 year old mother has a vcr gathering dust under her tv, has not been hooked up for at least 10 years.
 
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6. Re: bits Jan 9, 2014, 21:25 HorrorScope
 
harlock wrote on Jan 9, 2014, 18:57:
AMD’s most powerful APUs ever, the AMD A10 7850K and 7700K (codenamed “Kaveri”), are now shipping and will be on shelves in desktops early next week, with pre-orders starting today from select system builders. “Kaveri” is the world’s first APU to include Heterogeneous System Architecture (HSA) features, the immersive sound of AMD TrueAudio Technology and the performance gaming experiences of Mantle API. “Kaveri”-based notebooks will be available in the first half of this year.

HSA

To fully exploit the capabilities of parallel execution units, it is essential for computer system designers to think differently. The designers must re-architect computer systems to tightly integrate the disparate compute elements on a platform into an evolved central processor while providing a programming path that does not require fundamental changes for software developers. This is the primary goal of the new HSA design.

HSA creates an improved processor design that exposes the benefits and capabilities of mainstream programmable compute elements, working together seamlessly. With HSA, applications can create data structures in a single unified address space and can initiate work items on the hardware most appropriate for a given task. Sharing data between compute elements is as simple as sending a pointer. Multiple compute tasks can work on the same coherent memory regions, utilizing barriers and atomic memory operations as needed to maintain data synchronization (just as multi-core CPUs do today).

The HSA team at AMD analyzed the performance of Haar Face Detect, a commonly used multi-stage video analysis algorithm used to identify faces in a video stream. The team compared a CPU/GPU implementation in OpenCL™ against an HSA implementation. The HSA version seamlessly shares data between CPU and GPU, without memory copies or cache flushes because it assigns each part of the workload to the most appropriate processor with minimal dispatch overhead. The net result was a 2.3x relative performance gain at a 2.4x reduced power level*. This level of performance is not possible using only multicore CPU, only GPU, or even combined CPU and GPU with today’s driver model. Just as important, it is done using simple extensions to C++, not a totally different programming model.

Time to invest?
 
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5. Re: Evening Tech Bits Jan 9, 2014, 21:02 SlimRam
 
  • Forget 4K TVs: Most Americans still own a VCR


  • *Reading this title I jump up out of my chair and start yelling*

    "OH SHIT! HONEY! I think we're going to have to get a 4K TV ...like NOW! Quick, quick honey throw out the fucking VCR before the TECHNO-POLICE SHOW UP!!!"

    *RUNS IN CIRCLES AS I HEAR THE TRAILER WINDOW SMASH AS MY WIFE THROWS THE VCR OUT THE WINDOW SCREAMING, AS I HEAR IT BOUNCE OFF MY '72 PINTO*

    This comment was edited on Jan 9, 2014, 22:37.
     
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    They always say that everyone's good at something...

    I just have to find the right kind of place that appreciates nude juggling of a midget, a hand grenade, and a porcupine while playing the kazoo and riding a unicycle backwards without a seat
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    4. Re: Evening Tech Bits Jan 9, 2014, 19:33 Silicon Avatar
     
    Yeah. It seems like kids end up with the library DVDs a lot and they end up scratched up way before their time. My DVD library doesn't seem to have a longevity problem.

    I am not sure I can tell a difference between 4k and 1080p at the distance I usually sit from the TV. I guess I'd have to see it in person. The thing is I just got around to finally getting a decent HD screen last year so I don't plan on reinvesting for a while. I guess by then 4k will be cheap and standard and I won't care.
     
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    3. bits Jan 9, 2014, 18:57 harlock
     
    AMD’s most powerful APUs ever, the AMD A10 7850K and 7700K (codenamed “Kaveri”), are now shipping and will be on shelves in desktops early next week, with pre-orders starting today from select system builders. “Kaveri” is the world’s first APU to include Heterogeneous System Architecture (HSA) features, the immersive sound of AMD TrueAudio Technology and the performance gaming experiences of Mantle API. “Kaveri”-based notebooks will be available in the first half of this year.

    HSA

    To fully exploit the capabilities of parallel execution units, it is essential for computer system designers to think differently. The designers must re-architect computer systems to tightly integrate the disparate compute elements on a platform into an evolved central processor while providing a programming path that does not require fundamental changes for software developers. This is the primary goal of the new HSA design.

    HSA creates an improved processor design that exposes the benefits and capabilities of mainstream programmable compute elements, working together seamlessly. With HSA, applications can create data structures in a single unified address space and can initiate work items on the hardware most appropriate for a given task. Sharing data between compute elements is as simple as sending a pointer. Multiple compute tasks can work on the same coherent memory regions, utilizing barriers and atomic memory operations as needed to maintain data synchronization (just as multi-core CPUs do today).

    The HSA team at AMD analyzed the performance of Haar Face Detect, a commonly used multi-stage video analysis algorithm used to identify faces in a video stream. The team compared a CPU/GPU implementation in OpenCL™ against an HSA implementation. The HSA version seamlessly shares data between CPU and GPU, without memory copies or cache flushes because it assigns each part of the workload to the most appropriate processor with minimal dispatch overhead. The net result was a 2.3x relative performance gain at a 2.4x reduced power level*. This level of performance is not possible using only multicore CPU, only GPU, or even combined CPU and GPU with today’s driver model. Just as important, it is done using simple extensions to C++, not a totally different programming model.
     
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    2. Re: Evening Tech Bits Jan 9, 2014, 18:12 nin
     
    jdreyer wrote on Jan 9, 2014, 18:06:
    Forget 4K TVs: Most Americans still own a VCR.

    I own one. Doesn't mean it's plugged in.

    Also, interesting tidbit. I have a friend who's a librarian. She says that a VHS tape lasts about 600 rentals before it degrades to the point where they have to replace it. For discs, it's only 100 rentals.


    I can't speak for your friends experience, but (I would think) it's a lot easier to damage a dvd than it is to damage a vhs cassette, based on the way the tape is largely protected by the external case.


     
    http://store.nin.com/index.php?cPath=10
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    1. Re: Evening Tech Bits Jan 9, 2014, 18:06 jdreyer
     
    Forget 4K TVs: Most Americans still own a VCR.

    I own one. Doesn't mean it's plugged in.

    Also, interesting tidbit. I have a friend who's a librarian. She says that a VHS tape lasts about 600 rentals before it degrades to the point where they have to replace it. For discs, it's only 100 rentals.
     
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    "Microsoft is the absent minded parent of PC gaming" - Verno
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