Send News. Want a reply? Read this. More in the FAQ.   News Forum - All Forums - Mobile - PDA - RSS Headlines  RSS Headlines   Twitter  Twitter
Customize
User Settings
Styles:
LAN Parties
Upcoming one-time events:

Regularly scheduled events

Saturday Legal Briefs

View
43 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 2.
< Newer [ 1 2 3 ] Older >

23. Re: Into the Black Nov 2, 2013, 19:48 Ozmodan
 
NegaDeath wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 18:19:
WaltC wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 17:45:
Snowden had taken a sworn oath not to do exactly what he did.

Oath to his countrymen overrides oath to his government.

Could not agree more. If the government is doing something wrong and you know about it how does an oath to the government protect the country?
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
22. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 19:28 Sepharo
 
Agent.X7 wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 19:02:
Taskeen wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 15:56:
Agent.X7 wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 15:42:

Haha, name me a South American country that respects human rights. And Russia isn't exactly a paragon of freedom and human rights.

Snowden's problem is that he isn;t a traitor, but 90% of the people who swear to uphold our Constitution ARE traitors, and they are ready to squash him like a bug to protect their power.

Example of Double Standards in International LAW

United States - Holds Asylum of a known CIA paid terrorist bomber Luis Pasada Carriles. Pasada was recruited by the CIA and BOMBED a cuban airliner, killing 76 innocent people in 1976.

Venezuela - Demands that the U.S. extradite Pasada for trial, but the U.S. refuses.

Venezuela said if Snowden were to reside in their country, they would only hand him over on the grounds that the U.S. hands over a known protected terrorists like Pasada that actually committed a real crime.

Look up history, the CIA and the U.S. government for YEARS subverted South American countries, going as far as installing dictators that went on killing rampages of their citizens. So I'd say the South American countries, at their core now, are highly resilient to illegal espionage by the U.S.

So that should give you a clue why South American countries, in the past, had governments that abused Human Rights.

Do you follow the international news much? All the governments in South America still have human rights abuse going on.

Brazil, while claiming to eradicate wage-slaves, has freed less than 2000 of the millions of them working on sugar plantations. Why? Because POLITICIANS. Police frequently torture people, and nothing is really done about it.

Venezuela? Yeah, a living paradise on earth. Chavez never once violated the human rights guarantees that HIS OWN FUCKING CONSTITUTION GURANTEED THE VENEZUELAN PEOPLE. Oh, wait. Yes he did, every damn day of his rule. Don't forget the awesomeness that is Caracas, a city where you are three times more likely to be murdered than in Cartel run Juarez Mexico. Number 6 in the world for muder rate baby, yeah!

Well that's two down, just 12 more to go until your generalization is correct.
 
Avatar 17249
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
21. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 19:02 Agent.X7
 
Taskeen wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 15:56:
Agent.X7 wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 15:42:

Haha, name me a South American country that respects human rights. And Russia isn't exactly a paragon of freedom and human rights.

Snowden's problem is that he isn;t a traitor, but 90% of the people who swear to uphold our Constitution ARE traitors, and they are ready to squash him like a bug to protect their power.

Example of Double Standards in International LAW

United States - Holds Asylum of a known CIA paid terrorist bomber Luis Pasada Carriles. Pasada was recruited by the CIA and BOMBED a cuban airliner, killing 76 innocent people in 1976.

Venezuela - Demands that the U.S. extradite Pasada for trial, but the U.S. refuses.

Venezuela said if Snowden were to reside in their country, they would only hand him over on the grounds that the U.S. hands over a known protected terrorists like Pasada that actually committed a real crime.

Look up history, the CIA and the U.S. government for YEARS subverted South American countries, going as far as installing dictators that went on killing rampages of their citizens. So I'd say the South American countries, at their core now, are highly resilient to illegal espionage by the U.S.

So that should give you a clue why South American countries, in the past, had governments that abused Human Rights.

Do you follow the international news much? All the governments in South America still have human rights abuse going on.

Brazil, while claiming to eradicate wage-slaves, has freed less than 2000 of the millions of them working on sugar plantations. Why? Because POLITICIANS. Police frequently torture people, and nothing is really done about it.

Venezuela? Yeah, a living paradise on earth. Chavez never once violated the human rights guarantees that HIS OWN FUCKING CONSTITUTION GURANTEED THE VENEZUELAN PEOPLE. Oh, wait. Yes he did, every damn day of his rule. Don't forget the awesomeness that is Caracas, a city where you are three times more likely to be murdered than in Cartel run Juarez Mexico. Number 6 in the world for muder rate baby, yeah!
 
Avatar 23400
 
Origin - JStarX7
STEAM - Agent.X7
PSN - JStar_X7
Xbox Live - Agent X7
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
20. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 18:46 Agent.X7
 
Cutter wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 17:25:
Agent.X7 wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 15:42:
Haha, name me a South American country that respects human rights. And Russia isn't exactly a paragon of freedom and human rights.

You mean those same South American countries where the CIA began coups and installed murderous, US friendly dictators like Pinnochet? And what the hell does the US know about human rights. All over the globe they've installed these same assholes all in the name of profit and US hegemony. The US isn't part of the problem, it IS the problem.

Here's a pretty comprehensive list of just CIA activities alone....

Killing Hope: U.S. Military and C.I.A. Interventions Since World War II

And btw, that's not hack work. It was vetted by guys like William Casey and all the info can be found in the Library of Congress under FOIA.

The idea of America really ended with Eisenhower leaving office. Can you imagine a sitting president today warning the populace against the dangers of the military-industrial complex? No, the real gangsterism started under Reagan. That's when we saw the shift with the war on the middle-class beginning and the looting of America began in earnest.

It's only now they're no longer pretending it isn't happening. They've realized the masses are too apathetic and self-absorbed to know and/or care. There will be no new Revolution this time around. Not unless it gets much, much worse, and the elites are too smart for that. They'll leave just enough to keep that from happening. And all those poor dumb sheeple will have missed their natural right to something better.

I am not saying the US is a paragon of freedom and human rights either. We are King Shit of the Bullshit pile, pretty much. Every goddamn politician talks up freedom and democracy while doing their damnedest to squash both.

And don't get me started on the CIA. Those guys have been royal cockups from the start. Let's put Castro in power! Whoops. Let's train Bin Laden and his Mujaheddin! Whoops. They are basically responsible for almost every terrorist act that has haunted us since WWII.
 
Avatar 23400
 
Origin - JStarX7
STEAM - Agent.X7
PSN - JStar_X7
Xbox Live - Agent X7
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
19. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 18:41 Agent.X7
 
Yosemite Sam wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 16:06:
Haha, name me a South American country that respects human rights.

Really? ... wow... just, wow.

And...still waiting for you to name ONE.
 
Avatar 23400
 
Origin - JStarX7
STEAM - Agent.X7
PSN - JStar_X7
Xbox Live - Agent X7
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
18. Re: Into the Black Nov 2, 2013, 18:19 NegaDeath
 
WaltC wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 17:45:
Snowden had taken a sworn oath not to do exactly what he did.

Oath to his countrymen overrides oath to his government.
 
Avatar 57352
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
17. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 18:13 RollinThundr
 
Julio wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 18:10:
WaltC wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 17:45:
Unlike Snowden, I know for a fact that the gov has never listened to my phone calls and has no dossier on me--why on earth would anyone except a paranoid whacko think himself so important as to warrant such attention?

Just keep thinking there's not a file on you and nobody's listened to your phone calls. That's like thinking there are politicians that aren't bought and paid for.

I think I heard a few "Baa baas" from his post, textbook definition of sheep that one.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
16. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 18:11 RollinThundr
 
Cutter wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 17:25:
Agent.X7 wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 15:42:
Haha, name me a South American country that respects human rights. And Russia isn't exactly a paragon of freedom and human rights.

You mean those same South American countries where the CIA began coups and installed murderous, US friendly dictators like Pinnochet? And what the hell does the US know about human rights. All over the globe they've installed these same assholes all in the name of profit and US hegemony. The US isn't part of the problem, it IS the problem.

Here's a pretty comprehensive list of just CIA activities alone....

Killing Hope: U.S. Military and C.I.A. Interventions Since World War II

And btw, that's not hack work. It was vetted by guys like William Casey and all the info can be found in the Library of Congress under FOIA.

The idea of America really ended with Eisenhower leaving office. Can you imagine a sitting president today warning the populace against the dangers of the military-industrial complex? No, the real gangsterism started under Reagan. That's when we saw the shift with the war on the middle-class beginning and the looting of America began in earnest.

It's only now they're no longer pretending it isn't happening. They've realized the masses are too apathetic and self-absorbed to know and/or care. There will be no new Revolution this time around. Not unless it gets much, much worse, and the elites are too smart for that. They'll leave just enough to keep that from happening. And all those poor dumb sheeple will have missed their natural right to something better.

It's a non partisan problem, yet let's blame it all on Reagan, when it started long before Reagan was even in politics Rolleyes2

Big government is bad yes? Yet you support democrats, which are the the biggest advocates of more government.

I don't disagree with everything your saying here, but trying to pin it on one party or the other is quite frankly borderline retarded at it's best.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
15. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 18:10 Sepharo
 
PC game enthusiast writes 3 paragraphs about unimportant NSA leaker.  
Avatar 17249
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
14. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 18:10 Julio
 
WaltC wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 17:45:
Unlike Snowden, I know for a fact that the gov has never listened to my phone calls and has no dossier on me--why on earth would anyone except a paranoid whacko think himself so important as to warrant such attention?

Just keep thinking there's not a file on you and nobody's listened to your phone calls. That's like thinking there are politicians that aren't bought and paid for.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
13. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 17:45 WaltC
 
Snowden had taken a sworn oath not to do exactly what he did. The government was paying him to do a job--he wasn't paying the government--he was not in charge. He knew he was breaking his oath and he knew he was committing a felony. It's laughable he thought himself above the law and above his oaths just because he saw things he (a) did not understand and (b) had only partial and incomplete information about--laughable he should think himself the Supreme Ruler of the country such that if he doesn't like something then only he has the authority to change it by blabbing grammar-school nonsense like a child watching too much Spy vs. Spy. Nincompoop.

The kindest thing you can say about the guy is that he's a dunce, imo.

Hope you enjoy Siberia and the Crimea, Snowden, 'cause that's where you'll live out the rest of your life, most likely. Good career move, there, sap. (Unlike Snowden, I know for a fact that the gov has never listened to my phone calls and has no dossier on me--why on earth would anyone except a paranoid whacko think himself so important as to warrant such attention?) The hardest thing for Snowden to face going ahead will be that he is nowhere near as important as he thinks he is. His ego is thrice as tall as he is.





 
Avatar 16008
 
It is well known that I do not make mistakes--so if you should happen across a mistake in anything I have written, be assured that I did not write it!
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
12. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 17:25 Cutter
 
Agent.X7 wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 15:42:
Haha, name me a South American country that respects human rights. And Russia isn't exactly a paragon of freedom and human rights.

You mean those same South American countries where the CIA began coups and installed murderous, US friendly dictators like Pinnochet? And what the hell does the US know about human rights. All over the globe they've installed these same assholes all in the name of profit and US hegemony. The US isn't part of the problem, it IS the problem.

Here's a pretty comprehensive list of just CIA activities alone....

Killing Hope: U.S. Military and C.I.A. Interventions Since World War II

And btw, that's not hack work. It was vetted by guys like William Casey and all the info can be found in the Library of Congress under FOIA.

The idea of America really ended with Eisenhower leaving office. Can you imagine a sitting president today warning the populace against the dangers of the military-industrial complex? No, the real gangsterism started under Reagan. That's when we saw the shift with the war on the middle-class beginning and the looting of America began in earnest.

It's only now they're no longer pretending it isn't happening. They've realized the masses are too apathetic and self-absorbed to know and/or care. There will be no new Revolution this time around. Not unless it gets much, much worse, and the elites are too smart for that. They'll leave just enough to keep that from happening. And all those poor dumb sheeple will have missed their natural right to something better.
 
Avatar 25394
 
"The South will boogie again!" - Disco Stu
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
11. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 17:23 jdreyer
 
Well, I'm not sure that Snowden would be covered by whistleblower protections since he revealed secret "legal" programs.

The problem is that because they were secret, they couldn't be challenged in court to determine constitutionality. It's very much a catch-22.

I'm very glad he did this, since it has opened a broader conversation about which freedoms we give up for safety. I agree that we're quickly becoming a security state, and yes, it doesn't really matter which party is in the WH or congress. I really can't see a way to undo what has been done. In this respect, OBL won. He fundamentally changed our country for the worse, making us more like regimes we despise than we would have done otherwise.

I always like to drop Ben Franklin's quote on these threads:

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
 
Avatar 22024
 
"It's just a bunch of mystic bovine scatology to me." - 1badmf
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
10. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 16:45 Taskeen
 
Here is a pretty good interview on current events as well:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jzsMSj6mQI

Cheers.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
9. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 16:29 RollinThundr
 
Sepharo wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 16:25:
RollinThundr wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 16:20:
Judging by Blue's note, I take it he does indeed consider Snowden a traitor. Interesting.

You have the weirdest comprehension of things. The na´vetÚ here is that Snowden would think the U.S. would stop treating him like a traitor. Though I don't think Snowden actually believes that, the letter is more like a formality.

Not seeing how that translates to Blue considering Snowden a traitor. If anything it's negative of the U.S. government.

Yeah I thought of that after hitting submit, still seems oddly worded though.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
8. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 16:25 Sepharo
 
RollinThundr wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 16:20:
Judging by Blue's note, I take it he does indeed consider Snowden a traitor. Interesting.

You have the weirdest comprehension of things. The na´vetÚ here is that Snowden would think the U.S. would stop treating him like a traitor. Though I don't think Snowden actually believes that, the letter is more like a formality.

Not seeing how that translates to Blue considering Snowden a traitor. If anything it's negative of the U.S. government.
 
Avatar 17249
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
7. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 16:20 RollinThundr
 
Judging by Blue's note, I take it he does indeed consider Snowden a traitor. Interesting.  
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
6. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 16:06 Yosemite Sam
 
Haha, name me a South American country that respects human rights.

Really? ... wow... just, wow.
 
Avatar 21539
 
PSN id PR345, PST - D3, GTA5, Borderlands 2, Grid 2, GTA4, BoS, RDR, GT5, COD WaW, KZ2, RAGE, Dirt2, MC LA, Skate2, LBP, Dead Nation - Wanna jam? Hit me up on PSN, Mention Blues News.

CIV4 MOD http://forums.civfanatics.com/showthread.php?t=326525
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
5. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 15:56 Taskeen
 
Agent.X7 wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 15:42:

Haha, name me a South American country that respects human rights. And Russia isn't exactly a paragon of freedom and human rights.

Snowden's problem is that he isn;t a traitor, but 90% of the people who swear to uphold our Constitution ARE traitors, and they are ready to squash him like a bug to protect their power.

Example of Double Standards in International LAW

United States - Holds Asylum of a known CIA paid terrorist bomber Luis Pasada Carriles. Pasada was recruited by the CIA and BOMBED a cuban airliner, killing 76 innocent people in 1976.

Venezuela - Demands that the U.S. extradite Pasada for trial, but the U.S. refuses.

Venezuela said if Snowden were to reside in their country, they would only hand him over on the grounds that the U.S. hands over a known protected terrorists like Pasada that actually committed a real crime.

Look up history, the CIA and the U.S. government for YEARS subverted South American countries, going as far as installing dictators that went on killing rampages of their citizens. So I'd say the South American countries, at their core now, are highly resilient to illegal espionage by the U.S.

So that should give you a clue why South American countries, in the past, had governments that abused Human Rights.

This comment was edited on Nov 2, 2013, 16:08.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
4. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Nov 2, 2013, 15:50 Seventyfive
 
Taskeen wrote on Nov 2, 2013, 14:14:

Snowden's problem is that he isn;t a traitor, but 90% of the people who swear to uphold our Constitution ARE traitors, and they are ready to squash him like a bug to protect their power.

^ THIS

Congress can commit whatever crimes against the American people and betray the constitution but God forbid someone whistleblows against them.
 
Avatar 57860
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
43 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 2.
< Newer [ 1 2 3 ] Older >


footer

.. .. ..

Blue's News logo