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Morning Legal Briefs

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17 Replies. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
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17. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Mar 1, 2013, 11:03 Creston
 
Sugarman wrote on Feb 28, 2013, 14:49:
I have free internet at my business and I really don't want to block ports or certain traffic "of which there is always a way around", or password protect my open wifi hotspot for customers only, because lets face it, I'd be out helping half the customers enter a password every day or they just get mad and go somewhere else. So lets say a random customer brings in a laptop every day, not the same customer but lets say just one laptop or device is brought in per day and that person downloads a song or movie or whatever. I say one device to give an example, there are many more than that per day. Lets just say one person per day is caught by the internet police downloading something they shouldn't and I receive one warning per day. If they throttle my internet every six days I'm going to be one pissed off business customer.

They will only throttle you once. After that, they stop harassing you. (I know it sounds like a joke, but it's true.)

Creston
 
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16. Re: More Big Picture Details Mar 1, 2013, 03:37 InBlack
 
HorrorScope wrote on Feb 28, 2013, 21:27:
Sugarman wrote on Feb 28, 2013, 15:05:
It says "home internet users", so maybe us businesses are safe for now, but how long until they decide to throttle us as well once everyone learns they just need to take their device to any business with free wifi and go crazy. The music mafia and the mpaa need to just go away, I'm sorry but they are trying like hell to keep an archaic business model running in a world that no longer supports it in the same fashion as it did 20 years ago.

I wonder why businesses are allowed to steal. Double standard. Will lose big in court.

Because thats what they do legally every day?
 
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15. Re: More Big Picture Details Feb 28, 2013, 21:27 HorrorScope
 
Sugarman wrote on Feb 28, 2013, 15:05:
It says "home internet users", so maybe us businesses are safe for now, but how long until they decide to throttle us as well once everyone learns they just need to take their device to any business with free wifi and go crazy. The music mafia and the mpaa need to just go away, I'm sorry but they are trying like hell to keep an archaic business model running in a world that no longer supports it in the same fashion as it did 20 years ago.

I wonder why businesses are allowed to steal. Double standard. Will lose big in court.
 
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14. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 17:31 Mashiki Amiketo
 
xXBatmanXx wrote on Feb 28, 2013, 10:25:
how do they send this message? Are they hijacking your web browser? If so, I have more concern for what THEY are doing than what any USER is doing....
Web pop-up box, which means one of a few things. They're doing it to people when they connect via DNS lookups, or they're using something like sandvine boxes to attach the message directly the packets. Since comcast has a history of using sandvine boxes, I'd lead towards the second option.
 
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there is a neat, simple solution;
and it is always wrong."
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13. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 17:04 Julio
 
Every pirate would then switch to business internet plans.  
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12. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 15:05 Sugarman
 
It says "home internet users", so maybe us businesses are safe for now, but how long until they decide to throttle us as well once everyone learns they just need to take their device to any business with free wifi and go crazy. The music mafia and the mpaa need to just go away, I'm sorry but they are trying like hell to keep an archaic business model running in a world that no longer supports it in the same fashion as it did 20 years ago.  
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11. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 14:49 Sugarman
 
I have free internet at my business and I really don't want to block ports or certain traffic "of which there is always a way around", or password protect my open wifi hotspot for customers only, because lets face it, I'd be out helping half the customers enter a password every day or they just get mad and go somewhere else. So lets say a random customer brings in a laptop every day, not the same customer but lets say just one laptop or device is brought in per day and that person downloads a song or movie or whatever. I say one device to give an example, there are many more than that per day. Lets just say one person per day is caught by the internet police downloading something they shouldn't and I receive one warning per day. If they throttle my internet every six days I'm going to be one pissed off business customer.  
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10. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 11:47 Creston
 
As for the two representatives introducing the SHIELD bill, go guys. At least there's still a FEW useful people in Washington, it seems.

Creston
 
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9. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 11:31 Creston
 
InBlack wrote on Feb 28, 2013, 08:56:
Im thinking this "Six Strikes" bullshit is just a cheap way ISPs can get away with throttling internet speeds. It beats having to upgrade their data centers every few years.

I doubt it. The throttling would happen for 72 hours maximum, and it would only happen once. That's not going to save any ISP any money.

They said yes to this to finally be rid of the RIAA whining (or so they think. The RIAA will of course start whining within a month that this six-strikes crap isn't working and will try to reintroduce SOPA, with help of their paid assholes Representatives in Washington,) and it's easy enough on their part, since they don't have to do the policing.

The whole six-strikes thing will accomplish nothing.

Creston

 
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8. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 11:20 Jivaro
 
xXBatmanXx wrote on Feb 28, 2013, 11:09:
Another email address (a temp one at that) is the last thing I need anyway.

I hear that. Just keep in mind that if you don't say otherwise, Comcast will send all of their marketing, support issues, billing reminders, etc to that Comcast email address and consider it "customer contact" even though they can easily look into their system and see that you have never accessed the account. When I changed my account to "digital only", which just means they don't snail mail me anything, I also set up my Comcast email address to simply forward everything to my primary account. You may not be a digital phone service customer so this might not apply to you, but i found the account useful for my voice mail. All of your voice mail is sent to that email account as a .wav file attachment. Useful primarily when we go on vacation or are similarly away from home for an extended period of time.
 
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7. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 11:09 xXBatmanXx
 
Jivaro wrote on Feb 28, 2013, 10:44:
Every Comcast customer has a Comcast email. You may not use it, you may not even know how to access it, but it exists. That is part of signing up with Comcast Internet service because it is part of what they create when they create your account. I didn't know I had one until I called into customer service to find out how to access my voice mail for my digital phone service. You may never have created or accessed a Comcast email address but because of the way Comcast's account system functions you do have one. In fact, the customer service rep I spoke to told me I could lock my email address so as not to receive or send messages but that I couldn't delete because of their billing and technical support systems. They even keep the email address listed on your account if you have 1 or 2 other email addresses listed as your contact email.

Don't take my word for it though, call them. To be specific, whomever the name on the bill for your service is, that is who has the email service. "billpayersname@comcast.net" for example. You can also get a number of email addresses for free associated to your account for free. For example, my wife and step-children all have Comcast email addresses. For whatever reason Comcast loves email and apparently bases quite a bit of their customer service infrastructure on the existence of it.


Another email address (a temp one at that) is the last thing I need anyway.
 
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In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. / Few men have virtue enough to withstand the highest bidder.
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6. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 10:45 Quboid
 
Cutter wrote on Feb 28, 2013, 09:35:
Change the Patent Office and stop with the ridiculous patents. That's what's really required.

Credit to Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) for trying. Whether or not it's sufficient (in its present or eventual form) is for people more qualified than me to say but it looks like a genuine attempt at curbing a serious problem.
 
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- Quboid
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5. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 10:44 Jivaro
 
Every Comcast customer has a Comcast email. You may not use it, you may not even know how to access it, but it exists. That is part of signing up with Comcast Internet service because it is part of what they create when they create your account. I didn't know I had one until I called into customer service to find out how to access my voice mail for my digital phone service. You may never have created or accessed a Comcast email address but because of the way Comcast's account system functions you do have one. In fact, the customer service rep I spoke to told me I could lock my email address so as not to receive or send messages but that I couldn't delete because of their billing and technical support systems. They even keep the email address listed on your account if you have 1 or 2 other email addresses listed as your contact email.

Don't take my word for it though, call them. To be specific, whomever the name on the bill for your service is, that is who has the email service. "billpayersname@comcast.net" for example. You can also get a number of email addresses for free associated to your account for free. For example, my wife and step-children all have Comcast email addresses. For whatever reason Comcast loves email and apparently bases quite a bit of their customer service infrastructure on the existence of it.

 
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4. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 10:25 xXBatmanXx
 
InBlack wrote on Feb 28, 2013, 08:56:
Im thinking this "Six Strikes" bullshit is just a cheap way ISPs can get away with throttling internet speeds. It beats having to upgrade their data centers every few years.

This has nothing to do with copyright infringement and the only reason ISPs actually agreed to go along with it is because of the potentialy very cost effective speed throttling.

Most people wont even bother to appeal the 35$ since I would wager 99.9% of all internet users have at some point at least streamed copyrighted material. (Not to mention the fact that the ISP is investigating itself...hmmm...smells funky to me)

Its speed throttling and its bullshit. Pirates will switch to VPNs anyway and those who arent tech savy enough to do so will suffer low internet speeds.

The whole thing seems shady....I am a Comcast customer, but I know for a FACT I don't have a comcast email address. Never have, never will. Secondly, as commenters posted on ARS, how do they send this message? Are they hijacking your web browser? If so, I have more concern for what THEY are doing than what any USER is doing....
 
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In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. / Few men have virtue enough to withstand the highest bidder.
Playing: New dad
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3. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 09:35 Cutter
 
Change the Patent Office and stop with the ridiculous patents. That's what's really required.
 
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2. Re: More Big Picture Details Feb 28, 2013, 09:25 HorrorScope
 
"Those accused of infringing can file an appeal for $35."

LOL you have to pay to prove your innocence. I guess they are judge and jury, someone is going to be suing soon.

But lets say you got a coupe of these... wouldn't the next step be just finding another ISP? So in the end they are telling at least some customers to leave? I left ATT very soon after I rec'd a letter about I was using too much internets (Netflix probably the biggest culprit) and was soon going to be billed extra for it. I called them said fine, cancel me. I found a faster/cheaper provider any way. They have some genius business managers over there. I cut my att home phone at the same time.

WB Cable called my dad to offer him some new services for more cash, he didn't want it so the telesales said, hey the package you have has been updated, you can get a faster and cheaper package. He did and saved $10 a month for better (and new router). Again what wonderful business people they have, they call to sell more and in the end it costs them more. Love it!

I'll need to see what email my ISP has for me, so I know where to monitor. I have Wave, which seems isn't on the list yet.
 
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1. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 28, 2013, 08:56 InBlack
 
Im thinking this "Six Strikes" bullshit is just a cheap way ISPs can get away with throttling internet speeds. It beats having to upgrade their data centers every few years.

This has nothing to do with copyright infringement and the only reason ISPs actually agreed to go along with it is because of the potentialy very cost effective speed throttling.

Most people wont even bother to appeal the 35$ since I would wager 99.9% of all internet users have at some point at least streamed copyrighted material. (Not to mention the fact that the ISP is investigating itself...hmmm...smells funky to me)

Its speed throttling and its bullshit. Pirates will switch to VPNs anyway and those who arent tech savy enough to do so will suffer low internet speeds.

This comment was edited on Feb 28, 2013, 09:33.
 
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17 Replies. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
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