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Morning Mobilization

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3. Re: Morning Mobilization Feb 18, 2013, 14:49 Creston
 
Cutter wrote on Feb 18, 2013, 11:49:
Toronto is a perfect example of a major city that never planned for the future in its roadways or transit and is a nightmare to get around in. And for the last 50 years all they've ever done is talk about improving transit and all we've seen is one crappy LRT and 4 new stations at the north end of the city which does sweet FA to alleviate all the problems in the heart of the city. Then you look at the metro's for NYC, Chicago, London, Paris, Tokyo, etc. and they work because you can get anywhere on the subway at any time so it not only doesn't contribute to street traffic but alleviates it in a major way.

Unless you have a convenient subway system no one is going to bother with mass transit. If I'm going to be stuck in traffic anyway at least it's going to be in my car where I don't have to hear/smell all the other people going from A to B. Not to mass transit - at least here - is crap because it doesn't run 24/7 so people who work evenings or nights really have no choice but to drive. And people who want to party late get screwed too.

I lived in London, and the subway is fantastic. It really can get you just about everywhere, and pretty quick too. However, the subway itself is overcrowded, and it didn't really noticeably affect the gridlock on the streets above.

Of course, cities of such size basically nullify any logic regarding traffic anyway. Once your city goes above 2 million or so people, it's going to be gridlocked no matter WHAT you do.

Creston
 
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2. Re: Morning Mobilization Feb 18, 2013, 11:49 Cutter
 
Toronto is a perfect example of a major city that never planned for the future in its roadways or transit and is a nightmare to get around in. And for the last 50 years all they've ever done is talk about improving transit and all we've seen is one crappy LRT and 4 new stations at the north end of the city which does sweet FA to alleviate all the problems in the heart of the city. Then you look at the metro's for NYC, Chicago, London, Paris, Tokyo, etc. and they work because you can get anywhere on the subway at any time so it not only doesn't contribute to street traffic but alleviates it in a major way.

Unless you have a convenient subway system no one is going to bother with mass transit. If I'm going to be stuck in traffic anyway at least it's going to be in my car where I don't have to hear/smell all the other people going from A to B. Not to mass transit - at least here - is crap because it doesn't run 24/7 so people who work evenings or nights really have no choice but to drive. And people who want to party late get screwed too.
 
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"Bye weeks? Bronko Nagurski didn't get no bye weeks, and now he's deadů Well, maybe they're a good thing." - Moe
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1. Traffic jams Feb 18, 2013, 10:19 Creston
 
Cool article, but this part

This data doesn't offer any overnight solution to traffic congestion, but it may help city planners and public transportation officials better target their resources. Focusing on problem neighborhoods might be the key.

As MIT described, the adoption of alternatives like public transportation, carpooling, flex time, and working from home can be effective in reducing traffic if undertaken by a small number of people in certain problem areas.

is simply untrue. They've tried that over and over again in Holland (which is likely the most gridlocked country in the world. Seriously, LA's traffic wouldn't even be announced on the morning's news, since they only do the "serious" traffic jams or the "non-regular" ones,) and found that while heavily forcing problem areas into alternative forms of transportation (at an incredible cost, I might add, because they were literally creating new bus lines to pick up like 10 people and bring them to work,) does free up the roads in question to a certain extent, that just leads other drivers, who would normally avoid said roads, to go "Hey, the A2 is moving! I'm taking that!" and thus cause it to gridlock again.

The only cure against traffic jams is capacity, and not just capacity on the road itself, but also capacity on the ancillary roads, and rapid "bleeding away" time. (ie, if the exit from the highway is blocked because the traffic light at the bottom is red for 90 seconds at a time, it causes traffic jams that can reach miles back from the rubberbanding effect.)

And, of course, creating more capacity in an already overbuilt urban environment is practically impossible, so...

Creston
 
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