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Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support

Update #17 to the Oculus Rift Kickstarter has word that the "pilot run" developer kits for the VR headsets are still on track to be released to developers next month. They also offer details on a change to the design to better accommodate vision correction, offering three sets of interchangeable eyecups and an adjustable viewing distance to compensate for nearsightedness or farsightedness. Word is: "This isn’t the perfect solution: the B and C cups won’t be ideal for everyone, but we’re hoping that they help some of the nearsighted developers. If you have other eye issues like astigmatism, the additional lens cups may not be sufficient. In short, your mileage may vary." They also offers loads of detail on their manufacturing process. Thanks Develop.

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34. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 20, 2013, 13:49 Razumen
 
Wikidd wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 17:10:
I don't see why most people would need correction support. I mean I appreciate some conditions like astigmatism will need correction, but most people who wear corrective lenses will be fine without them while using the Rift. The Rift is going to be displaying an image about an inch from your eye, so you'd need an extreme level of refractive error to not be able to focus on that.

There's the obvious question of how it sits on your head and whether there will be room for glasses underneath. I'm guessing that since they want to keep it small and light there won't be enough room.

Also, glasses don't cover your whole vision, if you were to wear some with the Oculus you'd be losing out on your peripheral vision to a degree.

But I agree, since the screen is so close it seems like it would affect farsighted people more, but since the projected image is in 3D and your focusing distance while wearing it is supposedly going to be in the infinite range, perhaps this causes more problems than I'm aware of.
 
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33. Re: More Big Picture Details Feb 7, 2013, 10:49 eRe4s3r
 
Obviously I hope you will provide a review if you buy it  
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32. Re: More Big Picture Details Feb 7, 2013, 01:16 Creston
 
HorrorScope wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 19:12:
Will everyone? Don't care. Just that it's good and enough support, that is all I need.

Actually, you do need a bit more. Because if you're the only one who buys it, nobody's going to support it, and you're left with a fairly useless peripheral.

Creston
 
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31. Re: More Big Picture Details Feb 6, 2013, 20:13 HorrorScope
 
eRe4s3r wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 18:53:
How do you think they will increase the screen resolution without making the simulator sickness worse? Have you not read the valve article on VR goggles? Screen refresh needs to be 240hz, games need to run at the same FPS as screen refresh. Input delay must be less than 2 frames (or 4ms) and head tracking needs to update the same speed.

That also means that if you want HD resolution VR goggles, you need a PC that runs modern games at steady 240fps... good luck with that Ignoring for now, that LCD's don't full-screen refresh at 240hz (and barely, by cheating, at 120hz)

And yes, I suppose it could be 120hz (but then that would double input delay).

As long as all these things are not done, VR goggles *will* make you sick. That is sad, but reality ;/


I'll still be my personal judge of that.
 
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30. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 19:33 Shataan
 
It`s all good and all to have vision correction etc. But 1st you`d think they`d deliver an actual working product right? By this I mean a headset that actually delivers on its promises. The real test is when it goes out to the Buyer Base. If it works, THEN you add in the other stuff. And tbh I am not convinced the Rift will be any better than the scads of low rez High Tech headsets that already failed back in the 3D headset heyday.

Ya know what DOES work awesome? Force Feedback. But no one is supporting it, or pushing its bounderies. Nope. Someone IS however looking to deliver yet another headset, and theirs is gonna triumph, where everyone elses failed???? Ahuh. Well, I hope the Rift delivers better than RAGE did.
 
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29. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 19:24 Midnight
 
Well, I'm near-sighted, but also have astigmatism... so crap :/  
http://www.crimsondark.com
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28. Re: More Big Picture Details Feb 6, 2013, 19:12 HorrorScope
 
Creston wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 13:54:
Other than the truly hardcore, is anyone going to walk around with, in essence, a full flight helmet strapped to their face? I know gaming has overcome some of the "nerd" stigma attached to it, but this would push it straight back in the basement category.

Not saying people should give two shits about that, but it likely weighs on many people's minds. The gaming industry has had a marked shift towards more social integration, more multiplayer, more games that you can play with a group, etc, and this is diametrically opposed to that entire endeavor.

I'm not so sure that this is going to have as wide a following as people think it will. I think it will be succesful, and it might even be an amazing gadget, but I don't see it becoming the go-to way of gaming.

Creston

People make asses of themselves with Kinect. Hey I'm sitting at a desk alone. If I can put a device on my head to make me engulfed in a game and it's better. Yup, I'll do it. Will everyone? Don't care. Just that it's good and enough support, that is all I need.
 
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27. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 18:53 eRe4s3r
 
How do you think they will increase the screen resolution without making the simulator sickness worse? Have you not read the valve article on VR goggles? Screen refresh needs to be 240hz, games need to run at the same FPS as screen refresh. Input delay must be less than 2 frames (or 4ms) and head tracking needs to update the same speed.

That also means that if you want HD resolution VR goggles, you need a PC that runs modern games at steady 240fps... good luck with that Ignoring for now, that LCD's don't full-screen refresh at 240hz (and barely, by cheating, at 120hz)

And yes, I suppose it could be 120hz (but then that would double input delay).

As long as all these things are not done, VR goggles *will* make you sick. That is sad, but reality ;/

 
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26. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 18:29 Krizzen
 
To me, virtual reality is the holy grail of gaming. Any tangible progress in VR is great, and accommodating (nearly) everyone along the way is just another step in the right direction.

I can't wait to see what developers do with the Rift and what the second iteration will bring.
 
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25. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 18:16 NegaDeath
 
Asmo wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 17:01:
Irt to the Occulus, VR got lost in the wilderness because there just wasn't the GPU grunt to do graphics as good as what you can get on a monitor at an acceptable FPS on the headset. The older VR just looked godawful and was at such a low framerate that it was migraine inducing. We're at that point now.

Indeed! The last time I saw a VR machine in the wild it was running this game (the name of the game helpfully supplied to me by a kindly blues poster in an old thread). Look at how primitive that is, it doesn't even have textures. Processing power and display tech have come so very far since then that its due for another shot.
 
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24. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 17:10 Wikidd
 
I don't see why most people would need correction support. I mean I appreciate some conditions like astigmatism will need correction, but most people who wear corrective lenses will be fine without them while using the Rift. The Rift is going to be displaying an image about an inch from your eye, so you'd need an extreme level of refractive error to not be able to focus on that.  
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23. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 17:01 Asmo
 
jdreyer wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 13:23:
I am wondering what kind of keyboard/mouse-type controllers will come out to support this given the fact that you'll still want that kind of control, but not be able to look at the keyboard with the Rift on your head.

Touch typing? X D

Gawd, I haven't looked at my keyboard in years (actually, for the last few it's because I'm pretty sure my hand salsa has created a sentient nether being that lurks under the keys waiting to trap my soul... ; )

Irt to the Occulus, VR got lost in the wilderness because there just wasn't the GPU grunt to do graphics as good as what you can get on a monitor at an acceptable FPS on the headset. The older VR just looked godawful and was at such a low framerate that it was migraine inducing. We're at that point now.

And I can tell you as a surround/eyefinity user of 3 years, immersion just makes the game that much better. eg. playing FC3 in surround is amazing. The sense of peripheral vision (eg. swimming under water and catching glimpses of those fucking bullsharks out of the corner of your eye as they line you up) is amazing, and that's viewing out through 3 horizontal windows.

The one thing with the headset style VR that always kinda confused me is how they get a game where your body/head are locked in line to respond to head commands vs mouse. Say for example CoD, you're running down an alley using the mouse to scan around. You look over your shoulder. Do you keep running straight with your head turned or do you run in the direction you are looking? How I'd handle this with the mouse/keyboard is to alter the movement keys so that I'm not running backwards. A system where your view point is controlled independently of the body (WoT/Mechwarrior Online style games come to mind) would require the game to support that mechanic and an ability to be aware of your body facing, like a torso twist meter.

I presume the games have to have OR support built in otherwise you might be required to turn off (if possible) the motion aspect of the headset and rely on mouselook aiming.
 
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22. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 16:34 DangerDog
 
Ursor wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 15:40:
I tried the prototype version at a trade show in November 2012 in Orlando.

The good:

TOTAL immersion, 110 diagonal FOV. 3DOF tracker integrated into system. Used a game controller to navigate fwd/bckwd and head sensor for yaw and pitch. Lightweight and low cost.


The bad:

1. Total immersion with no outside reference points led to simulation adapation sickness within 1 minute of use. This will differ for eveyrone, but I feel it could be a deal breaker, especially for fast twitch games. I could not use it for any length of time.
2. Very big pixels due to cell phone displays being used. Not sure if they have designed in optics, probably not at that price point. The pixels blurred very bad with any head movement. Demo dude said this was being addressed in next prototype version. Large pixels and large FOV lead to very poor angular resolution. This means the graphics quality is good for close up virtual distances, in fact the demo took place in a closed virtual room. If if was setup for longer in game distances, like shooting more than 50 meters, there would be very low resolution, and things would look blocky. At farther virtual ranges, you would not be able to identify objects/people as foe or friend.

thanks for the mini review, mostly why I'm waiting for the production version which will hopefully address things like big pixels and motion blur.
 
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21. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 16:17 Creston
 
Bradley wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 15:37:
Creston wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 13:54:
Other than the truly hardcore, is anyone going to walk around with, in essence, a full flight helmet strapped to their face? I know gaming has overcome some of the "nerd" stigma attached to it, but this would push it straight back in the basement category.

I don't think you are supposed to walk with it at all. My impression was that it simply gives you the real version of what Mouse Look emulates; the ability to actually look around with your head.

It was more a figure of speech. I would also imagine your neck will get really tired in a hurry from having that thing strapped to your face...

Creston
 
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20. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 15:40 Ursor
 
I tried the prototype version at a trade show in November 2012 in Orlando.

The good:

TOTAL immersion, 110 diagonal FOV. 3DOF tracker integrated into system. Used a game controller to navigate fwd/bckwd and head sensor for yaw and pitch. Lightweight and low cost.


The bad:

1. Total immersion with no outside reference points led to simulation adapation sickness within 1 minute of use. This will differ for eveyrone, but I feel it could be a deal breaker, especially for fast twitch games. I could not use it for any length of time.
2. Very big pixels due to cell phone displays being used. Not sure if they have designed in optics, probably not at that price point. The pixels blurred very bad with any head movement. Demo dude said this was being addressed in next prototype version. Large pixels and large FOV lead to very poor angular resolution. This means the graphics quality is good for close up virtual distances, in fact the demo took place in a closed virtual room. If if was setup for longer in game distances, like shooting more than 50 meters, there would be very low resolution, and things would look blocky. At farther virtual ranges, you would not be able to identify objects/people as foe or friend.
 
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19. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 15:37 Bradley
 
Creston wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 13:54:
Other than the truly hardcore, is anyone going to walk around with, in essence, a full flight helmet strapped to their face? I know gaming has overcome some of the "nerd" stigma attached to it, but this would push it straight back in the basement category.

I don't think you are supposed to walk with it at all. My impression was that it simply gives you the real version of what Mouse Look emulates; the ability to actually look around with your head.
 
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18. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 15:18 Talisorn
 
entr0py wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 13:24:
I hope once they make a production version it will accommodate wearing your glasses at the same time. The two prescription eye cups definitely wouldn't work for me, and needing to wear contacts would be a deal breaker.

It's this simple really. Entr0py has nailed it.
 
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17. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 14:28 WyldKat
 
Frijoles wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 10:53:
I used to be very interested in VR, back when I was graduating high school and entering college (many years ago). I had an HMD, Virtual IO I think it was, and it was fun to play with. But ultimately it was shit. The resolution was horribly low. The FOV was terrible. The head tracking wasn't exactly accurate. A game of Descent left me hunched over crashing in to walls while I felt like puking.

Skip ahead to Oculus. When the Kickstarter was announced, I was definitely dubious. It sounded like Virtual IO all over again. That is, it sounded like shit. I admit it had my attention when Carmack and Newell came out in support of it. But then the reviews started to come out. I haven't seen a single negative review for these things. They seem to have nailed it in the areas that matter. FOV, resolution, latency.

As has been said elsewhere, a lot of technologies are coming together for the first time. Cheap high-quality screens for the optics, low-latency tracking, developers, and Kickstarter. Personally I'm interested in this because it's something I've always been interested in, only this time it really looks like they got it right. And at the right time. I'm still extremely skeptical. Nonetheless, I dropped the $300 for a pair of dev glasses. If they suck, well, it's a toy for my kids when they get older (not supposedly to let children use these types of devices since I guess it'll screw their eyes up).

But if it's as amazing as it sounds, and it is indeed a game changer, I want to be there when it starts. So I can sit around on message boards and talk about the old days when it just came out, like we do with graphic cards. So I can be part of that first wave of amazement and tinkering. But mainly because VR is something I've always been interested in.

tl;dr: because it looks neato.


Very good post. I was skeptical of it too until I saw members of the press testing it out, pointing at things that weren't really "there" and more importantly, ducking when they went under a low object.
 
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16. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 14:27 DangerDog
 
Which of these two setups do you want?

http://i.imgur.com/ZMuXW.gif

I think people are going to sit around on the forums discussing ways to remove the red ring around your face from wearing the Oculus Rift for hours on end.
 
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15. Re: Oculus Rift Vision Correction Support Feb 6, 2013, 14:14 DangerDog
 
I'll be sporting a couple of D cups for sure.

Panickd wrote on Feb 6, 2013, 10:15:
Why is everyone so interested in this? Strapping motion controlled monitors to your head doesn't sound like the truly immersive experience I was promised with VR technology so long ago.

Until we completely figure out how the human brain works we're not going to be putting some hat on our heads and beaming images and sound right to our brain.

The potential for this is whatever you make of it, if you just want the experience of having a view that completely envelops your peripheral view you could disable the motion tracking and just use it as a replacement screen. Enable the motion sensors and go nuts with creating a VR experience.

http://www.pcgamer.com/2013/02/04/half-life-2-modded-for-oculus-rift-support/

not sure how he's doing the movement.

This comment was edited on Feb 6, 2013, 14:21.
 
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