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Out of the Blue

I discovered the plastic innards of our coffee grinder are cracked, and the tube that passes the beans onto the burrs is now in two pieces. Amazingly, this inexpensive Cuisinart grinder still actually works in spite of this, continuing to show a surprising will to live after taking beatings to get it to grind beans, which has lead to it needing a weight sitting on it to work. For a long time I was looking for an excuse to replace this with something a bit spiffier, but it's been cranking along for over four years, which is longer than the cool KitchenAid grinder it replaced lived, so I'm starting to take it as a point of pride to keep it running and want to repair it and give it one more lease on life. And yes, it's crossed my mind that it's sad that four years seems like a great lifespan for one of these electric grinders, as I bet there are manual hand-crank grinders out there that are still operating fine after 100 years.

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12. Re: Out of the Blue Oct 2, 2012, 15:23 jdreyer
 
Cutter wrote on Oct 1, 2012, 19:09:
There are still quality things out there. A good set of knives, cookware - cast/iron/enamel/copper, pepper/spice/coffee/rice mill - Peugot, etc. will all last you a lifetime and a few generations if taken care of. So, it's not that it's not worth dropping the coin, you simply have to distinguish what's popular - brand wise - versus what's actually good. If you're buing something every few years to replace a shitty product you may as well have dropped the coin to begin with and have the superior product in the first place.

Actually, that's very true. It depends on the object. I was thinking of appliances, but you're right, I have cast iron pans and a set of expensive Henckel knives, both of which have gotten 10 years of daily use, that are still basically brand new.
 
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"It's just a bunch of mystic bovine scatology to me." - 1badmf
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11. Re: Out of the Blue Oct 2, 2012, 10:00 Verno
 
Creston wrote on Oct 1, 2012, 17:31:
Manufacturers realized that if they built something to last, it would last, and people would never buy new. If instead they'd build something that would die in a few years, people would go buy new.

Sure, there's some truth to the planned obsolescence thing. Printers and light bulbs are a great example of that. On the other hand there is a lot of stuff that is simply far more complex and prone to wear/tear, especially considering our reliance on miniature electronics in almost every facet of our lives.

For the past 50 years, companies have been basing their business model around planned obsolescence. If they were to all suddenly make goods that lasted a lifetime now, our economy would literally collapse. It's a such a crazy, inter-connected chain with roots everywhere from the US to China that there is no going back. It will have to be forced by lack of natural resources to continue production as these rates.
 
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10. Re: Out of the Blue Oct 2, 2012, 02:02 Ant
 
Creston wrote on Oct 1, 2012, 17:31:
Mashiki Amiketo wrote on Oct 1, 2012, 12:44:
Yeah you're probably right on the manual handcrank jobs still working fine after 100 years. My grandmother is still using her mothers 1950's automatic rising/lowering toaster and still works perfectly, though I did have to get some german solder(silver/tin/flux) to fix on element on it about 5 years ago for her. And every toaster I've owned in the last few years dies out after a few years, or starts to burn toast.

Manufacturers realized that if they built something to last, it would last, and people would never buy new. If instead they'd build something that would die in a few years, people would go buy new.

Ergo, Latin, everything now dies in 3-5 years. It's pure bullshit.

Creston
That is why I get and still use old stuff like CRT TVs, VCRs, etc.

This comment was edited on Oct 2, 2012, 15:25.
 
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9. Re: Out of the Blue Oct 1, 2012, 20:15 BobBob
 
Poor people can't afford to buy twice.  
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8. Re: Out of the Blue Oct 1, 2012, 19:09 Cutter
 
There are still quality things out there. A good set of knives, cookware - cast/iron/enamel/copper, pepper/spice/coffee/rice mill - Peugot, etc. will all last you a lifetime and a few generations if taken care of. So, it's not that it's not worth dropping the coin, you simply have to distinguish what's popular - brand wise - versus what's actually good. If you're buing something every few years to replace a shitty product you may as well have dropped the coin to begin with and have the superior product in the first place.
 
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"The South will boogie again!" - Disco Stu
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7. Hand crank coffee Oct 1, 2012, 18:25 jdreyer
 
And yes, it's crossed my mind that it's sad that four years seems like a great lifespan for one of these electric grinders, as I bet there are manual hand-crank grinders out there that are still operating fine after 100 years.
I love my hand crank grinder, and it makes superior coffee, but it takes 15m and a lot of effort to grind enough beans for a pot of coffee. So I usually use the electric one.
 
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"It's just a bunch of mystic bovine scatology to me." - 1badmf
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6. Re: Out of the Blue Oct 1, 2012, 18:24 jdreyer
 
Creston wrote on Oct 1, 2012, 17:31:
Mashiki Amiketo wrote on Oct 1, 2012, 12:44:
Yeah you're probably right on the manual handcrank jobs still working fine after 100 years. My grandmother is still using her mothers 1950's automatic rising/lowering toaster and still works perfectly, though I did have to get some german solder(silver/tin/flux) to fix on element on it about 5 years ago for her. And every toaster I've owned in the last few years dies out after a few years, or starts to burn toast.

Manufacturers realized that if they built something to last, it would last, and people would never buy new. If instead they'd build something that would die in a few years, people would go buy new.

Ergo, Latin, everything now dies in 3-5 years. It's pure bullshit.

Creston

Yeah. This has the unfortunate effect of me not wanting to splurge on something expensive. I have no idea if it's going to last longer or not, so I just go cheap expecting the expensive one would break in about as much time anyway, and I'd be out even more money.
 
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"It's just a bunch of mystic bovine scatology to me." - 1badmf
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5. Re: Out of the Blue Oct 1, 2012, 17:31 Creston
 
Mashiki Amiketo wrote on Oct 1, 2012, 12:44:
Yeah you're probably right on the manual handcrank jobs still working fine after 100 years. My grandmother is still using her mothers 1950's automatic rising/lowering toaster and still works perfectly, though I did have to get some german solder(silver/tin/flux) to fix on element on it about 5 years ago for her. And every toaster I've owned in the last few years dies out after a few years, or starts to burn toast.

Manufacturers realized that if they built something to last, it would last, and people would never buy new. If instead they'd build something that would die in a few years, people would go buy new.

Ergo, Latin, everything now dies in 3-5 years. It's pure bullshit.

Creston
 
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4. Re: Out of the Blue Oct 1, 2012, 16:18 Cutter
 
BobBob wrote on Oct 1, 2012, 15:09:
Ever wonder why your coffee tastes a bit like a grinder?

Hey! You got your chocolate in my peanut butter!
 
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"The South will boogie again!" - Disco Stu
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3. Re: Out of the Blue Oct 1, 2012, 15:09 BobBob
 
Ever wonder why your coffee tastes a bit like a grinder?  
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2. Re: Out of the Blue Oct 1, 2012, 13:40 Creston
 
Btw, the Morrowind Overhaul 3.0 came out today.

http://www.ornitocopter.net/

The original download is hammered to death, so maybe wait until some links are up.

Creston
 
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1. Re: Out of the Blue Oct 1, 2012, 12:44 Mashiki Amiketo
 
Yeah you're probably right on the manual handcrank jobs still working fine after 100 years. My grandmother is still using her mothers 1950's automatic rising/lowering toaster and still works perfectly, though I did have to get some german solder(silver/tin/flux) to fix on element on it about 5 years ago for her. And every toaster I've owned in the last few years dies out after a few years, or starts to burn toast.  
--
"For every human problem,
there is a neat, simple solution;
and it is always wrong."
--H.L. Mencken
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