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Out of the Blue

That belly band dealie we got for the Gunnar-man really does look like it should do the trick, but it just seems a little too tight to leave on him for an extended period. If I can't find another nearby store to look for a larger one I'll find a way to get one online, as I am very eager to stop cleaning up urine puddles.

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21. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 19:54 sauron
 
jdreyer wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 18:45:
In my experience (Mom's a champion breeder, so we always had 7-8 dogs in the house growing up) is that you MUST clean the urine with undiluted ammonia to eliminate the smell, or they'll detect their own mark and remark. The ammonia destroys the organic chemicals that the dog leaves behind. At this point, you'd have to move the stove and clean the floor under it I'd say.

Seconded - forgot all about this aspect. Definitely worth adding to the plan, and bleach is cheap.
 
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Kittens!
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20. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 18:57 jdreyer
 
Congratulations, NASA. When I saw that plan a couple of months ago, I couldn't believe they were going to try something so complicated. It just seemed destined for failure. My hat is off to them.

Also, spiders are cool.
 
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19. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 18:45 jdreyer
 
sauron wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 15:47:
Blue wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 14:41:
sauron wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 13:39:
This behavior is male territoriality (try saying that after 2 pints of beer!), so I'm assuming he's entire?

In a younger dog, getting him fixed might solve the problem, but in older males like the Gunnar-man it probably won't help - too late for it to make a significant difference.

He is, as they like to say "intact." I've seen it argued both ways whether this contributes to the tendency to mark, but most seem to agree that it does, which also seems the intuitive answer. But even those who feel that neutering helps with marking seem to agree that by the time he's all grown up this horse is out of the barn, so while we may be tempted to castrate him as a punishment, it doesn't sound like it will solve our issue.

Yes, neutering wouldn't help at all at his age.

If it were me, I'd use judicious use of the word 'No' while showing him the 'incident' so he knows the context. I also mentioned before you can combine this with a gentle smack with a rolled-up sheet of paper/newspaper. The latter is just to make noise, for reinforcement of the message.

Hopefully, he gets it eventually. Good luck!

In my experience (Mom's a champion breeder, so we always had 7-8 dogs in the house growing up) is that you MUST clean the urine with undiluted ammonia to eliminate the smell, or they'll detect their own mark and remark. The ammonia destroys the organic chemicals that the dog leaves behind. At this point, you'd have to move the stove and clean the floor under it I'd say.

Also, you might consider making the areas he's marking hard to walk on. Put down double sided tape to make it sticky, or put one of those plastic office chair mats upside down so that all of the bumps are up, making it painful to walk on (try it yourself!) You can get them for $20 at Costco.
 
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"It's just a bunch of mystic bovine scatology to me." - 1badmf
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18. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 18:21 Cutter
 
Yeah, reading a book or two on dog training/conditioning sounds pretty necessary at this point so you can utilize positive and negative reinforcement models. I still also don't understand why you're o hesitant to leave him in the backyard - while the weather is good anyway. Regardless, it sounds like you definitely need to get alpha with him or he won't stop.
 
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17. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 17:26 sauron
 
nin wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 16:38:
He also consumes huge amounts of water and must be rationed.

Keep an eye on that as he gets older. I had a cat who, in the last years of her life, began drinking a lot of water and losing weight. Ended up being diabetes (which was treatable).


Yes, it can also indicate kidney failure in older animals, especially cats, whereas losing weight and eating a lot usually indicates hyperthyroidism. Also both very manageable. Cats seem to have a number of inbuilt design faults, even before you get to their lack of basic survival skills.

But yeah, in young animals it's often just a habit. Makes them pee buckets though, which is kind of annoying.
 
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16. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 17:03 xXBatmanXx
 
nin wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 16:38:
He also consumes huge amounts of water and must be rationed.

Keep an eye on that as he gets older. I had a cat who, in the last years of her life, began drinking a lot of water and losing weight. Ended up being diabetes (which was treatable).


Thanks for reminder. He is just an excitable kid. He forgets that he has to be outside to pee so he just keeps drinking it.
 
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15. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 16:38 nin
 
He also consumes huge amounts of water and must be rationed.

Keep an eye on that as he gets older. I had a cat who, in the last years of her life, began drinking a lot of water and losing weight. Ended up being diabetes (which was treatable).

 
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14. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 16:19 xXBatmanXx
 
Blue wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 14:41:
sauron wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 13:39:
This behavior is male territoriality (try saying that after 2 pints of beer!), so I'm assuming he's entire?

In a younger dog, getting him fixed might solve the problem, but in older males like the Gunnar-man it probably won't help - too late for it to make a significant difference.

He is, as they like to say "intact." I've seen it argued both ways whether this contributes to the tendency to mark, but most seem to agree that it does, which also seems the intuitive answer. But even those who feel that neutering helps with marking seem to agree that by the time he's all grown up this horse is out of the barn, so while we may be tempted to castrate him as a punishment, it doesn't sound like it will solve our issue.

yea at that age it is just mean. All 3 of my pups are fixed. 2 boys 1 girl. The 3 yo choc german short hair marks EVERYWHERE - thank god OUTSIDE! He also consumes huge amounts of water and must be rationed. I still will crate all 3 of them if needed, and the 3 yo does well when crated to stop the peeing if he is left alone for more than 8 hours. He doesn't mind and routinely all 3 will sleep in their "kennels". They are all setup in the house and they love them.

But they mostly sleep on the leather couches. I have only had 1 peeing incident since the 4th of July when our roomate passed away. They were used to having someone there almost all the time so they had lots of outdoor freedom. Last week the 3 yo slipped up (I knew this as he did not pee outside when I got home and the other 2 did) Now they have to go a couple hours before they get attention! hehehehe

I just need to keep water up if need be.

Good luck Blue. Nothing more frustrating than a peein pooch in the house....
 
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13. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 15:57 nin
 
sauron wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 15:47:
Blue wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 14:41:
sauron wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 13:39:
This behavior is male territoriality (try saying that after 2 pints of beer!), so I'm assuming he's entire?

In a younger dog, getting him fixed might solve the problem, but in older males like the Gunnar-man it probably won't help - too late for it to make a significant difference.

He is, as they like to say "intact." I've seen it argued both ways whether this contributes to the tendency to mark, but most seem to agree that it does, which also seems the intuitive answer. But even those who feel that neutering helps with marking seem to agree that by the time he's all grown up this horse is out of the barn, so while we may be tempted to castrate him as a punishment, it doesn't sound like it will solve our issue.

Yes, neutering wouldn't help at all at his age.

If it were me, I'd use judicious use of the word 'No' while showing him the 'incident' so he knows the context. I also mentioned before you can combine this with a gentle smack with a rolled-up sheet of paper/newspaper. The latter is just to make noise, for reinforcement of the message.

Hopefully, he gets it eventually. Good luck!

BE STILL, CODY!

 
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12. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 15:47 sauron
 
Blue wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 14:41:
sauron wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 13:39:
This behavior is male territoriality (try saying that after 2 pints of beer!), so I'm assuming he's entire?

In a younger dog, getting him fixed might solve the problem, but in older males like the Gunnar-man it probably won't help - too late for it to make a significant difference.

He is, as they like to say "intact." I've seen it argued both ways whether this contributes to the tendency to mark, but most seem to agree that it does, which also seems the intuitive answer. But even those who feel that neutering helps with marking seem to agree that by the time he's all grown up this horse is out of the barn, so while we may be tempted to castrate him as a punishment, it doesn't sound like it will solve our issue.

Yes, neutering wouldn't help at all at his age.

If it were me, I'd use judicious use of the word 'No' while showing him the 'incident' so he knows the context. I also mentioned before you can combine this with a gentle smack with a rolled-up sheet of paper/newspaper. The latter is just to make noise, for reinforcement of the message.

Hopefully, he gets it eventually. Good luck!
 
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11. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 14:41  Blue 
 
sauron wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 13:39:
This behavior is male territoriality (try saying that after 2 pints of beer!), so I'm assuming he's entire?

In a younger dog, getting him fixed might solve the problem, but in older males like the Gunnar-man it probably won't help - too late for it to make a significant difference.

He is, as they like to say "intact." I've seen it argued both ways whether this contributes to the tendency to mark, but most seem to agree that it does, which also seems the intuitive answer. But even those who feel that neutering helps with marking seem to agree that by the time he's all grown up this horse is out of the barn, so while we may be tempted to castrate him as a punishment, it doesn't sound like it will solve our issue.
 
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10. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 13:44 Bucky
 
Silicon Avatar wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 12:44:
http://www.ustream.tv/NASAJPL

There's a NASA Ustream about the rover.

Space probes are pretty cool.

I took an interest in Curiosity when I saw it in the news a few weeks ago and I've been following it ever since. My jaw dropped when I saw the EDL plan, I figured this thing had a high likelihood of adding another crater to Mars. It's a testament to everyone that worked on the project that not only did everything work, it worked to near perfection.
 
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9. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 13:39 sauron
 
This behavior is male territoriality (try saying that after 2 pints of beer!), so I'm assuming he's entire?

In a younger dog, getting him fixed might solve the problem, but in older males like the Gunnar-man it probably won't help - too late for it to make a significant difference.
 
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Kittens!
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8. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 13:37 Tim H
 
Hey there! \Our scottish terrier Brodie developed bladder cancer and we got a garment called a "pee Keeper".. It was an awesome thing in that it could be worn for a long time and all ya needed to do was change the napkins. Brodie could wear it for extended periods of time... We did have to do some modification so the tail was little farther away because it could chafe his butt but it was a godsend and allowed us to have a somewhat normal life with him when he couldn't control his bladder anymore... His quality of life went way up too.

[url=]http://www.peekeeper.com/[/url]
 
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7. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 13:29  Blue 
 
Creston wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 11:26:
How old is he, though? I thought he was getting on in years? Seems odd for him to suddenly start doing that, unless there's a new dog that moved into the area that visits your yard/house at night...

Creston

He was an election baby, so he will be eight in November. He has always been juvenile though, so it's not *that* surprising that some signs of maturity are eventually coming through.

And it does seem like this was all very coincidental in talking about moving, but whether that actually triggered it or not, he seems to clearly be operating purely on instinct at this point.
 
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6. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 13:23 nin
 
xXBatmanXx wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 12:34:
Creston wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 11:26:
How old is he, though? I thought he was getting on in years? Seems odd for him to suddenly start doing that, unless there's a new dog that moved into the area that visits your yard/house at night...

Creston

nah, never got over them talking about moving! hahahahaha


The timing does seem odd...

 
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5. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 12:44 Silicon Avatar
 
http://www.ustream.tv/NASAJPL

There's a NASA Ustream about the rover.

Space probes are pretty cool.
 
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4. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 12:34 xXBatmanXx
 
Creston wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 11:26:
How old is he, though? I thought he was getting on in years? Seems odd for him to suddenly start doing that, unless there's a new dog that moved into the area that visits your yard/house at night...

Creston

nah, never got over them talking about moving! hahahahaha
 
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In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. / Few men have virtue enough to withstand the highest bidder.
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3. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 11:26 Creston
 
How old is he, though? I thought he was getting on in years? Seems odd for him to suddenly start doing that, unless there's a new dog that moved into the area that visits your yard/house at night...

Creston
 
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2. Re: Out of the Blue Aug 6, 2012, 11:15  Blue 
 
InBlack wrote on Aug 6, 2012, 10:58:
Blue I assume youve been to the vet? Maybe the problem is a physiological one rather than psychological?

She concluded that this is classic male dog marking behavior. I think she's right: There's nothing at all that's gone on that indicates otherwise. For example: Left alone, he will mark the stove within *minutes*. If I bring him up to my office with me, he can go for hours with no issue.
 
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