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Blizzard on Diablo III Security

Blizzard has posted a message in response to the perception that recent reports of account hacking in Diablo III represent an uptick in such incidents. They say the number of compromised accounts does not represent anything unusual for their games, and that they continue to recommend the use of the Battle.net Authenticator or the Battle.net Mobile Authenticator for best security of your Battle.net account:

We'd like to take a moment to address the recent reports that suggested that Battle.net® and Diablo® III may have been compromised. Historically, the release of a new game -- such as a World of Warcraft® expansion -- will result in an increase in reports of individual account compromises, and that's exactly what we're seeing now with Diablo III. We know how frustrating it can be to become the victim of account theft, and as always, we're dedicated to doing everything we can to help our players keep their Battle.net accounts safe -- and we appreciate everyone who's doing their part to help protect their accounts as well. You can read about ways to help keep your account secure, along with some of the internal and external measures we have in place to help us achieve our security goals, at our account security website here: www.battle.net/security.

We also wanted to reassure you that the Battle.net Authenticator and Battle.net Mobile Authenticator (a free app for iPhone and Android devices) continue to be some of the most effective measures we offer to help players protect themselves against account compromises, and we encourage everyone to take advantage of them. In addition, we also recently introduced a new service called Battle.net SMS Protect, which allows you to use your text-enabled cell phone to unlock a locked Battle.net account, recover your account name, approve a password reset, or remove a lost Authenticator. Optionally, you can set up the Battle.net SMS Protect system to send you a text message whenever unusual activity is detected on your account, keeping you aware of important (and possibly unwanted) changes.

For more information on the Authenticator, visit http://us.battle.net/support/en/article/battle-net-authenticator-faq

For more on the Battle.net Mobile Authenticator, visit http://us.battle.net/support/en/article/battle-net-mobile-authenticator-faq

For more on Battle.net SMS Protect, visit http://us.battle.net/support/en/article/battlenet-sms-protect

We also have other measures built into Battle.net to help protect players. Occasionally, when Battle.net detects unusual login activity that differs from your normal behavior -- such as logging in from an unfamiliar location -- we may prompt you for additional information (such as the answer to one of your security questions) and/or require you to perform a password reset through the Battle.net website. World of Warcraft players might be familiar with this security method already, and Diablo III players may begin to encounter it as well.

As always, if you think you've been the victim of an account compromise, head to the "Help! I've Been Hacked!" tool at http://us.battle.net/en/security/help for assistance.

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51 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 1.
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51. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 24, 2012, 00:00 Slippy
 
OK, just for the record... I went ahead and added the mobile auth and SMS messaging (no cost except standard messaging fees from your mobile phone company)... If I end up getting hacked... I'll let you guys know...  
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50. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 18:56 WaltC
 
CJ_Parker wrote on May 23, 2012, 05:37:
Jeez what a load of BS. You clearly have absolutely no clue what the fuck you are even talking about. The icing on the cake is that you come across as some wannabe high horse intelligent elite when in reality your post is one of the most retarded anti-factual write-ups to be witnessed on here in a long time. An amazing display of arrogance and stupidity. Well played, Sir.

Sheeeesh...;)

Be aware that your display of "ignorance and stupidity" just topped mine, and by a landslide margin. Your problem is likely that you don't understand the simple post I've made and this inability to communicate with the outside world fills you with rage and causes you to vomit up irrational personal insults. That about it? Heh...;)

If you can't do better than to hurl idiotic insults then please--say nothing. OK?

Anyway, you may want to look up how trojan horses and keyloggers are used to hack "individual systems in people's homes". That's what the vast majority of these account hacks are like. Some dumbass downloads "diablo3infinitegold.exe" and contracts a keylogger either by directly downloading and installing the infected file or by means of a drive-by infection. Hacker then remotely receives account credentials. Hacker logs into victim's account using these credentials and does whatever they're after, i.e. steal gold or items, delete the character, whatever...

OK, you have outlined exactly one way it might happen. You know, if it had happened to maybe *one person*, maybe *one time*--I might even agree with you.

That's your theory? Let's see, as I told another guy, we live in an age where banks and credit-card companies and US Government files and police stations and tech companies like Valve (who has been hacked twice, IIRC) have all been hacked by 16 year-olds. Yet you want to allege that Blizzard is invulnerable and can't be hacked. The most logical assumption is that Blizzard has been hacked--either from the outside or an employee inside--and that this is the only credible source for all of this information.

Keyloggers are old hat, guy. "Drive-by" infections--that's pretty good--I'll have to remember that the next time I want to tell the owner of a computer that the reason his Battlenet account has been hacked is because he did it to himself, because he's such a dunce. You do realize that with the right kind of firewall it wouldn't matter if someone had slipped in a keylogger?--it would get blocked and couldn't do anything or go anywhere. If someone gets a dose of malware so powerful that it takes over his machine and refuses to be blocked, among other things, then even an inexperienced person will know to format C:\ and reinstall, if that's what it takes.

You cannot categorically say that all of these cases stem from "keyloggers" (so retro) and users too dumb to properly wipe their noses. Seriously guy, if they are that clueless, how do they play the game? They shouldn't be able to figure out the rules...;)

No one who is only after account credentials hacks Blizzard's (well protected, well monitored) servers directly. There may be hacker groups (like the infamous 'Anonymous') who have made it a sport to try to break into Blizzard's backbone or to disturb their services via (D)DOS attacks but the goal of these direct high level attacks is totally different from your regular small scale account theft.

What happens a lot is that somebody inside the company wants to make some pretty good money so he sells some crucial info to interested parties. That's one way it happens--and it happens in a lot of situations. As I mentioned, Valve has a bunch of "well-monitored, well-protected" servers--and Valve got hacked--info was taken--it was not merely a DoS, either. Same thing has happened to the "well-protected, well-monitored" servers at banks, hospitals, credit-card companies, PayPal--the list is impressive. None of those were DoS attacks, either.

My premise is simple: It is Blizzard's responsibility to ensure that its customers' account security is maintained. It is just that simple. You can hold Blizzard's customers accountable if you wish--in that case, the situation will never be remedied and it will just get worse. Or, you can demand (if you are a paying customer) that Blizzard protect its customers' accounts--and this is a solution that I think will ultimately work. In fact, it's the only solution I see that has a prayer of working.

Just about everything you wrote is therefore 100% bullshit.

Nah...;) You just got confused and meant to describe your own post. It's not your fault, though, because I reached over and installed a keylogger when you weren't looking! Your fault! Bzzz-z-z-zt! What I did to you was your fault, right?

 
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It is well known that I do not make mistakes--so if you should happen across a mistake in anything I have written, be assured that I did not write it!
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49. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 18:17 WaltC
 
Dirwulf wrote on May 23, 2012, 04:47:
WaltC, you've been smoking weed or something. The paid authenticator is $6.50 and the mobile app is free. You are reading posts from people talking out their ass and repeating it as fact. Also, no one is hacking Blizzard to get account information. They are getting the information from 3rd party sites or phishing scams.

You wrote a really long post that is 100% pure bullshit.

Sorry, but no...;) One thing--it was very late and I was tired last night--almost delirious, actually--but I stand by the nuts & bolts of what I said.

If the only way Blizzard can guarantee people's Battlenet account security is through a $6.50 authenticator (I know the other folks get it free)--then why is Blizzard charging *anything* to anybody? The "authenticator" should be standard and paid for in the game with every Battlenet account.

But that wasn't the main issue for me--I read post after post yesterday--I will not rejoin those forums because I have read enough rubbish on the issue--that claimed that people's own boxes were being hacked--that's right--that their own computers were being hacked, and they blamed the people who got their accounts compromised for the problem!

Wherever you and I may think the hackers are getting their information, I think we can agree on the fact that *it isn't coming from individual Battlenet customers who forgot to install Norton's last month*...;) That's ridiculous.

I don't understand why you'd think Blizzard wasn't being hacked--banks get hacked, police get hacked, hospitals and credit-card companies get hacked, Valve has been hacked a couple of times--why not Blizzard? After all, the Blizzard servers contain all the information the hackers need, don't they? There's no need for the hackers to look or go anywhere else.

 
Avatar 16008
 
It is well known that I do not make mistakes--so if you should happen across a mistake in anything I have written, be assured that I did not write it!
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48. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 13:14 theyarecomingforyou
 
Creston wrote on May 23, 2012, 11:04:
Well, what you're doing then is essentially turning your security question into just another password. And if you forgot the first one, what are the odds that you remember the second one? It's fun to put Bobby Kotick as the maid of honor, but are you going to remember that that's what you did a year from now?

Unless you use the exact same thing on every website as the answer to the security question, but that's basically just as bad as just using the same password everywhere. Once someone has figured out that Bobby Kotick is the answer to your security question, they can reset your passwords everywhere.

Creston
I give valuable accounts unique passwords that I store in an encrypted, password protected Excel document - using the same password for multiple services is a recipe for disaster. Short of having a photographic memory for unique passwords no matter what you do there will always be a weak link. The goal is simply to try to minimise it.
 
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SteamID: theyarecomingforyou
Star Citizen: Blue's News
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47. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 11:04 Creston
 
Zadig wrote on May 23, 2012, 08:08:
Creston wrote on May 23, 2012, 00:30:
To be fair, most outfits just make you choose from a pre-selected 6 or 8 options, and they'll all retardedly easy questions to figure out about somebody.

There's very few places that allow you to specify both the answer as well as the question.

Creston

While you can't choose the questions, the answers don't have to be logical and should certainly never, ever, be anything found on facebook or in search engines. No hacking or social engineering will discover that Bobby Kotick was the maid of honor at your wedding.

Well, what you're doing then is essentially turning your security question into just another password. And if you forgot the first one, what are the odds that you remember the second one? It's fun to put Bobby Kotick as the maid of honor, but are you going to remember that that's what you did a year from now?

Unless you use the exact same thing on every website as the answer to the security question, but that's basically just as bad as just using the same password everywhere. Once someone has figured out that Bobby Kotick is the answer to your security question, they can reset your passwords everywhere.

Creston
 
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46. No subject May 23, 2012, 10:33 007Bistromath
 
Oh god. They're responding to this problem by making it worse. How can they not realize what a bad idea SMS Protect is? Many dumbphones are practically disposable through prepaid services. The gravy train just got a new car.  
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45. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 09:50 Alamar
 
InBlack wrote on May 23, 2012, 07:52:
While its true that most users are to blame when it comes to their account security there have been a number of reports of people loosing their accounts by simply playing in open games with 'hackers' who somehow manage to bypass the security wholesale?

First, you're going to trust the judgement of those that were hacked (that they know precisely when it happened)?

Surely, it couldn't be that they heard some (officially) disputed rumor and jumped on that bandwagon...

It's always astounded me how badly (and often) people connect things, usually based on two occurrences... I washed my car last week, and it rained 36m later... Then I washed my bike and it rained 6m later... Which totally makes sense, because I used rain-barrel water, and the car weighs 6x that of the bike.

-Alamar
 
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44. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 09:30 Shineyguy
 
I suppose it's a good thing that I don't have a Facebook account, and I keep any really personal information to myself when online.

I love not having Facebook.
 
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43. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 08:48 dangerman77
 
Creston wrote on May 22, 2012, 22:40:
Yeah, hackers have just managed to brute force thousands of people's of passwords all in one week.

"Thousands"? Where has that number come from?
 
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42. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 08:42 Mr. Tact
 
Zadig wrote on May 23, 2012, 08:08:
Creston wrote on May 23, 2012, 00:30:
To be fair, most outfits just make you choose from a pre-selected 6 or 8 options, and they'll all retardedly easy questions to figure out about somebody.

There's very few places that allow you to specify both the answer as well as the question.

Creston

While you can't choose the questions, the answers don't have to be logical and should certainly never, ever, be anything found on facebook or in search engines. No hacking or social engineering will discover that Bobby Kotick was the maid of honor at your wedding.
Absolutely correct, Zadig. I'm not this "paranoid", but I have a friend who despite being very computer savvy keeps security information on a printed list. I think he keeps the document on a PC which has the ethernet disabled -- and of course, he has regular backups some of which go to a safety deposit box at the bank. He tells companies his mothers maiden name is "9v8r33yz" and stuff like that.
 
Truth is brutal. Prepare for pain.
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41. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 08:18 Mr. Tact
 
InBlack wrote on May 23, 2012, 07:52:
It looked very Blizzard like and I clicked on the link, took me to a site that looked exactly like bnet with the login screen and all but the URL looked kinda weird...after the .net there was another .is or .es or some weird country denomination...
Yeah -- some of them are getting better at it. While I still get plenty have attempts that look like they were made by 5th graders during recess at their elementary school every now and then I see one like you are describing.

I'm guessing they take a real Blizzard notice and add something about verifying your account. As a matter of principal I never click links in emails unless it's an email I requested (ie. like a forum password reset) or from a small group of known friends.

Once I got one convincing enough that I logged into Battle.net to prove to myself there was nothing going on -- but I certainly didn't use the link in the email.
 
Truth is brutal. Prepare for pain.
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40. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 08:15 Veterator
 
Haven't played a blizzard game in probably 4-5 years now. Last game I played was WoW and I dropped my subscription way back when.

No hacking while it was down, nothing like that. But they kept sending me emails to upgrade to battle net so I could choose whatever about it before it was too late.

So I went ahead and upgraded (not following links in emails just incase it was a phish). Within a week after doing so, my primary account, the one that had all the stuff on it, was hacked. So it had went years with no one logging in, and boom hacked as soon as I upgraded. I thought the timing of it was very questionable.

Did a scan on my system for trojans, keylogs, etc...found nothing. I still don't know how in the hell they knew my account had been updated and got to it within a week of it being done. Because according to the recovery rep, no one had been on my account for years and the first activity was the battle net stuff.

Now, I believe that some accounts are user fault, and hell even more than most may be user fault. It's just that the plainly obvious user fault is much easier to see than the other stuff going on, and having them just flat out say it's user fault no matter what is really questionable.


I still think they had someone pulling accounts at opportune times, or at points when some process is taking place they may not have secured like the battlenet account upgrade and linking everything to one account.

That no activity, upgrade to bnet and then breached in less than a week is just TOO convenient. Either they are getting logins or email addresses to use to brute force it, or something else is going on....the timing is just highly highly suspicious.

 
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39. matthew@welchkin.net May 23, 2012, 08:14 Watter
 
Ravor wrote on May 22, 2012, 22:25:
Tuesdays are when they do maintenance. It's been like that for the last 4 years or so now. Quitting because they are maintaining their game and making it better for you to play is very short sighted.
Wait... seriously? I should be thankful that my "single player" game that should NOT require an always on connection is not available to me because they're doing server maintenance? In what universe should I be thankful for that?
 
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38. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 08:08 Zadig
 
Creston wrote on May 23, 2012, 00:30:
To be fair, most outfits just make you choose from a pre-selected 6 or 8 options, and they'll all retardedly easy questions to figure out about somebody.

There's very few places that allow you to specify both the answer as well as the question.

Creston

While you can't choose the questions, the answers don't have to be logical and should certainly never, ever, be anything found on facebook or in search engines. No hacking or social engineering will discover that Bobby Kotick was the maid of honor at your wedding.
 
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37. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 07:52 InBlack
 
While its true that most users are to blame when it comes to their account security there have been a number of reports of people loosing their accounts by simply playing in open games with 'hackers' who somehow manage to bypass the security wholesale?

In a game such as Diablo3 where for the first time in mainstream gaming history something like a Real Money Auction house will be available for D3 players, doesnt anyone think that hackers would be attracted to that like flies to shit????

Whatever the case may be, about a month or two before Diablo3 got released I got a very professional looking mail from what appeared to be Blizzard warning me to log in to battle.net to verify my identity as they had a report that my WoW account might have been stolen/traded whatever...

It looked very Blizzard like and I clicked on the link, took me to a site that looked exactly like bnet with the login screen and all but the URL looked kinda weird...after the .net there was another .is or .es or some weird country denomination...

Alarm bells went off in my head at that time and I never did log in to fake 'bent' but I wonder how many who preordered Diablo & had an old unused WoW account did....

In any case that was the best phishing attempt I have ever seen, no spelling mistakes, very well worded and the actual site mirrored the new battle.net to a fault, except for the URL...

This comment was edited on May 23, 2012, 07:58.
 
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36. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 07:08 JediPunisher
 
Dirwulf wrote on May 23, 2012, 04:47:
You wrote a really long post that is 100% pure bullshit.

Well, you should thank Walt for writing such a pithy essay... One of his more garrulous posts clocked in at 2441 words and 189 lines.
My mother always taught me to say something nice or nothing at all... so, WaltC, you have excellent typing skills.

 
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35. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 05:37 CJ_Parker
 
WaltC wrote on May 23, 2012, 03:46:
I really would not think I'd have to spell it out for anybody these days, but if your D3 account has been hacked then *nobody broke into your home machine and got this information*--LoL--they get it all right from Blizzard's own servers! There's no way in hell they could get that kind of info from trying to hack individual systems in people's homes remotely! The idea is unbelievably dense and stupid, imo. People who have online D3 accounts with Blizzard and who are experiencing these hacked accounts should understand--your machine at home was not and is not now being hacked for that information! IE, *you* "didn't do it!" Hope this makes you feel better...;)

Jeez what a load of BS. You clearly have absolutely no clue what the fuck you are even talking about. The icing on the cake is that you come across as some wannabe high horse intelligent elite when in reality your post is one of the most retarded anti-factual write-ups to be witnessed on here in a long time. An amazing display of arrogance and stupidity. Well played, Sir.

Anyway, you may want to look up how trojan horses and keyloggers are used to hack "individual systems in people's homes". That's what the vast majority of these account hacks are like. Some dumbass downloads "diablo3infinitegold.exe" and contracts a keylogger either by directly downloading and installing the infected file or by means of a drive-by infection. Hacker then remotely receives account credentials. Hacker logs into victim's account using these credentials and does whatever they're after, i.e. steal gold or items, delete the character, whatever...

No one who is only after account credentials hacks Blizzard's (well protected, well monitored) servers directly. There may be hacker groups (like the infamous 'Anonymous') who have made it a sport to try to break into Blizzard's backbone or to disturb their services via (D)DOS attacks but the goal of these direct high level attacks is totally different from your regular small scale account theft.

Just about everything you wrote is therefore 100% bullshit.
 
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34. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 04:47 Dirwulf
 
WaltC, you've been smoking weed or something. The paid authenticator is $6.50 and the mobile app is free. You are reading posts from people talking out their ass and repeating it as fact. Also, no one is hacking Blizzard to get account information. They are getting the information from 3rd party sites or phishing scams.

You wrote a really long post that is 100% pure bullshit.
 
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33. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 03:46 WaltC
 
It amazes me that people are buying this kind of software! I think I've made the point before and so have a lot of people: offline single-play and local LAN multiplayer play have, at worst, workable configuration issues--not friggin' security issues out of the *ss!! If you're playing an offline game and your loot disappears then *you* did it, somehow, or else the program is still very buggy. Case closed. Life is sweet when it's kept simple. This kind of D3 crap is for the birds.

I read so many posts today on battlenet written by people who were blaming other customers for the fact that hackers were breaking into Blizzard's D3 servers! How many times did I hear--"If you aren't running Norton's and this or that malware program, etc., then it's nobody's fault but yours if Blizzard's servers get ambushed and whacked, and all your account data is stolen." These posters weren't going to let a little thing called "good sense" interfere with their apocalyptic ramblings!

You know it's really, really bad when the self-appointed experts in these threads start yelling and screaming about the customer's *local* security--when, by golly, it isn't even the customer's box that's being hacked! Good grief, a third-grader could figure this out...;) Why should a Blizzard account hacker, any hacker, waste his time trying to hack into someone's individual machine at home when the client at home doesn't have the information he's looking for, even if our hypothetical idiot was to decide to hack it anyway!

All of the information the hackers want and need is right on the Blizzard servers--all of it. It's concentrated there so that information on literally millions of D3 accounts is at Blizzard's finger tips. So....not being stupid themselves, the hackers after this information for nefarious reasons look for it on the Blizzard servers! They don't need to break into individual boxes at home because those boxes wouldn't supply them with a microscopic fraction of the info they want.

I really would not think I'd have to spell it out for anybody these days, but if your D3 account has been hacked then *nobody broke into your home machine and got this information*--LoL--they get it all right from Blizzard's own servers! There's no way in hell they could get that kind of info from trying to hack individual systems in people's homes remotely! The idea is unbelievably dense and stupid, imo. People who have online D3 accounts with Blizzard and who are experiencing these hacked accounts should understand--your machine at home was not and is not now being hacked for that information! IE, *you* "didn't do it!" Hope this makes you feel better...;)

The account hackers--just like the game-play hackers--are *hacking BLizzard*--not Blizzard's customer base one at a time--Haw!--even assuming such a thing could be done, when it probably cannot because of the sheer scope and size of the hacking project itself.

In fact, trying to remotely hack into people's systems at home and when they are online is such a preposterous notion that I cannot believe anyone would so much as consider it. The people stealing from Blizzard account holders are stealing it with the information they have gleaned from their studies of the Blizzard network and how it might work. It is that network, the Blizzard owned and operated network, that is being hacked.

This darn "account verification" exercise seems a bit daft, to me. Apparently, in acknowledging that their security such as it is cannot adequately protect people's Blizzard account information, Blizzard seems determined to continue to pour gasoline on this fire by offering to *sell* its customers a service--does Blizzard call it the "authenticator"?

Anyway, I also heard this service was voluntary for the customer, although Blizzard is only providing these services [i]for a fee.[/i] I saw the figure of $10 in one post in which the fellow said that's what Blizzard charged him to set up the "authenticator" for his account. I have no idea at the moment whether this is just a temporary situation, however. Also--I don't have or want the authenticator service myself (it is called something very similar to "authenticator," so please forgive any inadvertent errors on my part.)


After account setup, an "authorization" signal simply cuts out all legitimast that whenever your BN account is being accessed or run, a phone number you supplied is rung, which means it has the highest probability of working as advertised. When you answer the call, a robot informs you that your Battlenet account has just been activated, but if you know about it then everything is fine (of course.) If not, the friendly but oil-guzzling robot provides you with a list of people and their telephone numbers if you suspect your account has been hacked. Presumably, these people can help.

Since it's Blizzard's network being illegally accessed in all of these account breaches, I certainly think it can be persuasively argued that Blizzard should be providing this service gratis for all current patients.

The service seems very simple: it is tied to your wired or wireless telephone number, and every time someone rings you up on it, a real Westerner dies in Western Yugoslavia, Africka...;)
 
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It is well known that I do not make mistakes--so if you should happen across a mistake in anything I have written, be assured that I did not write it!
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32. Re: Blizzard on Diablo III Security May 23, 2012, 03:36 Mashiki Amiketo
 
Sepharo wrote on May 23, 2012, 01:38:
Yay everyone is looking at my Facebook, I'm popular! I've made it!
Hah.
 
--
"For every human problem,
there is a neat, simple solution;
and it is always wrong."
--H.L. Mencken
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