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Diablo III Auctions Detailed

Blizzard announces a new Global Play functionality for Battle.net to allow Diablo III players to play on servers in different regions. They also announce a new Auction House Website for the action/RPG as home to the in-game auction functionality in the action/RPG sequel. This FAQ has all the details, including how the house rake will work:

In the gold-based auction house, a 15% transaction fee will be deducted from the final sale price of a successful auction.

In the real-money auction-house, for equipment such as weapons and armor, a fixed transaction fee will be deducted from the seller for each piece of equipment successfully sold. This fee is assessed only if the item is sold. For commodities such as crafting materials, gems, gold, and other “stackable” items, a 15% transaction fee will be deducted from the total sale price.
[…]
Note that additional fees apply for players who choose to receive the proceeds of their successful auction via PayPal™ (in regions where this option is available). See the Functionality section of this FAQ for further details.

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157 Replies. 8 pages. Viewing page 2.
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137. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 4, 2012, 05:46 Quinn
 
Krovven wrote on May 3, 2012, 19:29:
Quinn wrote on May 3, 2012, 17:13:
There will be thousands of players who are not at all interested in multiplayer. It takes "only a few" (relatively speaking) to collapse the (RM)AH economy entirely.

So people that won't be touching MP or the Auction Houses will collapse the game economy? /facepalm

You didn't read my earlier posts so stop trying to be a condescending smartass, Krovven. I hate it with a goddamn passion that I have to waste my time repeating myself because of people like you.

Multiplayer is integrated in singleplayer in such a way that singleplayer gamers can use the AH without the normally tedious steps of first getting into a multiplayer section of the game. In this way they'll use the AH as just that: a singleplayer AH. This is the first game with such an integration which is why my hypothesis is what it is.


Krovven wrote on May 3, 2012, 19:29:
Quinn wrote on May 3, 2012, 17:13:
This even happened on rare occassions in WoW AH's, where apathetic people dropped stuff you could sell for 30gold on the AH for 2gold.

As for gaming the RMAH, it will be interesting to see how things play out. If it sucks, I don't feel any obligation to use it. However since it will be REAL money and not digital coin as in WoW, the business people won't be dropping $20,000 to corner a market for a day like is done in WoW.

Frankly I'm not worried at all about it and don't expect it to effect my enjoyment of the game whether I use the AH or not. There are economists at Blizz that are far more intelligent than you or I that have put this together.


Nowhere, absolutely nowhere, have I said that I have problems with the RMAH and that I'm afraid it will effect my enjoyment in the game. All I am saying is that I personally doubt the RM part will get off the ground because of the fact that this game has the MP integrated in the SP in such a fashion, that SP gamers can (unknowingly and unintentionally) ruin the idea.

Lastly, on the intelligence thing where one guy funny enough cheered on... let me enlighten you with the following pearl of wisdom: Intelligence /= Expertise.
 
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136. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 4, 2012, 00:08 Dades
 
Slippy wrote on May 3, 2012, 23:51:
My appologies if it came across that way Dades... not my intent.

What I mean is you are a very small part of the largest shareholder a company can have... it's customer base. You do own a very small amount of stock in Blizzard when you purchased Diablo 2 (<- meant for example only). You own your stock, you can trade your stock, you can sell your stock and, as a whole, the customer shareholder decides the fate of any company. By your voice, united with the majority of this shareholder base, can change the direction of a company.

This is all that I meant.

No apology necessary, I think we're just having two different discussions here and I'm done with Diablo 3 anyway so good luck and have fun, shareholder or not
 
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135. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 23:59 Slippy
 
RollinThundr wrote on May 3, 2012, 23:48:
I'm in IT if you really must know. So yes I do realize server costs for the hardware itself, though taking into consideration Blizzard has had Battle.net running since about 96 or so, you would think they wouldn't really need much infrastructure additions at this point. WoW still prints money for them, Vivendi isn't some poor 3rd rate publisher either. And I'm hating watching an industry I've loved for 30+ years slowly kill itself from out of control budgets and flat out greed schemes, cutting content to sell as DLC, along with RMAH bullshit for a game that should allow single player to begin with.

Here's the thing with Blizzard games, they never innovate, they never push technology, and they take far longer to ship than any other dev in the industry, more than likely due to lack of proper project management.

I honestly don't give a shit about their ROI, this game should have shipped about 5 years ago, instead they killed off Blizzard North, rebooted the game, and took an additional 6 years of dev time to WoW it up visually while retaining the same ol low res textures and lack of polys that blizzard is famous for (IE it'll run on little Billy's P4.) And they also found a way to monetize it just short of a subscription fee.

They are the only developer in the industry that could literally shit in a box, sell it, and their fanbois would call it the best shit ever taken by man.

This, I understand. I felt very similar when I ran into DLC first in a game... but soon realized, this is the direction the industry is going. I'm not a huge fan of DLC, but it makes sense from a business perspective. Unfortunately, what makes sense for business will florish so long as (I say again) the market will bare it. Unfortunately IMO, DLC and similar business practices in the software industry HAVE been accepted by the gaming community as a whole and are here to stay (although it may take a slightly different form in the near future).
 
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134. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 23:51 Slippy
 
Dades wrote on May 3, 2012, 23:43:
I'm sure that strange statement means something to you but the definition of shareholder doesn't extend to anyone who buys a consumer product. If you want to throw around broad business buzzword speak then I'll leave you to it, enjoy.
My appologies if it came across that way Dades... not my intent.

What I mean is you are a very small part of the largest shareholder a company can have... it's customer base. You do own a very small amount of stock in Blizzard when you purchased Diablo 2 (<- meant for example only). You own your stock, you can trade your stock, you can sell your stock and, as a whole, the customer shareholder decides the fate of any company. By your voice, united with the majority of this shareholder base, can change the direction of a company.

This is all that I meant.
 
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133. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 23:48 RollinThundr
 
Slippy wrote on May 3, 2012, 22:42:
RollinThundr wrote on May 3, 2012, 20:51:
It's not expensive on their end to host, the items are already designed, developed and in the game and paid for.

At that point it's pure greed on Blizzard's part. but of course the usual blizzard sucktard is all for it. How shocking.
I'm not digging here RollinThundr, just curious... what exactly do you do for a living? I manage a factory that employs over 150 people and I do contract programming as a side job for anywhere between three to five companies at any given time.

I've always been amazed at how much things really do cost to research/design/purchase/assemble or build/ship/market and finally sell... The ROI on a game like Diablo 3 will no doubt be a longer time than you might realize. They will make money (don't get me wrong) but throwing statements around like "It's not that expensive to..." you're probably further off than you think. Also remember, D3 doesen't just have to make money to pay off what they invested in it, they also have an obligation to continue to provide a steady revenue stream to support all the other games/servers/web-sites/research/etc that they do on a daily basis that no one sees.

D3 was also publically announced just under 4 years ago. I'm sure they did a lot of R&D before the announcement... So that is, at the very minimum, four years of wages, software, Hardware and 'brick and morter' that has been paid out before even $1 was collected prior to pre-orders. If you take the size of the development teams (coders, IT support, play testers, artists, sound teams, media teams, sales and public relations, team managers, and on and on and on) coupled with the average wages and benifits for people of their skill level, you have a heafty dollar value that needs to be recouped before a single dollar of profit is seen. Where do you think a lot of the profit from past ventures go??? Not in the pockets of the CEO's. Most companies bank the money so that they can afford to pay these new projects for 4, 6 or even 8 years without return so that they don't have to go out and borrow the money while the project is developing (this usually kills projects, especially software related ones). Even then, from a business perspective, they have to ensure that the ROI on the money they are spending or banking must be higher than if they would have rolled those profits into some type of return investment like a bond... otherwise it wouldn't 'pay' to fund the project in the first place.

Yet you still state, "It's not that expensive to..." which I respond, "OOOOhhhhh Kayyyyyyy..."

The ~15%(applied however many times on monies in and/or out) is what their research and statistical data tells them the market will bear to maximize a ROI in the shortest time possible coupled with box and digital sales of the game. This could go up over time and could go down depending on all the afore mentioned variables... but I'm sure I'm wrong and it's much simpler than that...

I'm in IT if you really must know. So yes I do realize server costs for the hardware itself, though taking into consideration Blizzard has had Battle.net running since about 96 or so, you would think they wouldn't really need much infrastructure additions at this point. WoW still prints money for them, Vivendi isn't some poor 3rd rate publisher either. And I'm hating watching an industry I've loved for 30+ years slowly kill itself from out of control budgets and flat out greed schemes, cutting content to sell as DLC, along with RMAH bullshit for a game that should allow single player to begin with.

Here's the thing with Blizzard games, they never innovate, they never push technology, and they take far longer to ship than any other dev in the industry, more than likely due to lack of proper project management.

I honestly don't give a shit about their ROI, this game should have shipped about 5 years ago, instead they killed off Blizzard North, rebooted the game, and took an additional 6 years of dev time to WoW it up visually while retaining the same ol low res textures and lack of polys that blizzard is famous for (IE it'll run on little Billy's P4.) And they also found a way to monetize it just short of a subscription fee.

They are the only developer in the industry that could literally shit in a box, sell it, and their fanbois would call it the best shit ever taken by man.
 
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132. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 23:43 Dades
 
Slippy wrote on May 3, 2012, 23:37:
Dades wrote on May 3, 2012, 23:32:
Asking to see things from Blizzards point of view doesn't extend to speculating on their ROI to most people, sorry. That's a dubious list of reasons to be a Blizzard shareholder, nothing more. Activision wants to make large profits which is all fine and dandy but 15-30% is a lot more than even the most ardent fanboys anticipated.
LMAO... Evidently you've never participated in strategic planning...
if you purchase their games (any of their games or use their services)...

You ARE a shareholder...

I'm sure that strange statement means something to you but the definition of shareholder doesn't extend to anyone who buys a consumer product. If you want to throw around broad business buzzword speak then I'll leave you to it, enjoy.
 
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131. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 23:37 Slippy
 
Dades wrote on May 3, 2012, 23:32:
Asking to see things from Blizzards point of view doesn't extend to speculating on their ROI to most people, sorry. That's a dubious list of reasons to be a Blizzard shareholder, nothing more. Activision wants to make large profits which is all fine and dandy but 15-30% is a lot more than even the most ardent fanboys anticipated.
LMAO... Evidently you've never participated in strategic planning...
if you purchase their games (any of their games or use their services)...

You ARE a shareholder...
 
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130. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 23:32 Dades
 
That's a dubious list of reasons to be a Blizzard shareholder, not really anything to do with customers. Activision wants to make large profits which is all fine and dandy but 15-30% is a lot more than even the most ardent fanboys anticipated. I already decided not to pick up the game before the announcement so it doesn't make a big difference to me but it still raised eyebrows with others I'm sure.  
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129. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 23:18 Slippy
 
Bhruic wrote on May 3, 2012, 23:04:
Sure, but all of those things are what the cost of the game is designed to pay for. At least, traditionally speaking. When you are adding a new revenue stream, you really should only be focused on the costs that are associated with developing and supporting that stream - the other costs were always there.

I see your point but it actually goes both ways. In MOST companies you setup profit centers which in turn impact total company bottom line. It's not uncommon to have profit centers that lose money on a monthly basis that are supported by other profit centers within the same company. It would obviously be the role of the CEO or CFO to try and fix those profit centers but sometimes it just is what it is... My point is that regardless, it has to be looked at on a company level (not just project level) because the Diablo 3 'project' was obviously going to lose money over the period of development which in turn must be budgeted correctly so that the other 'profit centers' can support it's development cycle or life.

And traditionally speaking, there weren't as heavy 'ongoing' costs associated with games as there is now-a-days with online play, DLC and continued patching/improvements/tweeks. I remember years back it was unusual to have a game patched more than once or twice as a maximum.




Bhruic wrote on May 3, 2012, 23:04:
Again, probably true, but I'm not sure where you are going with that. As customers, are we supposed to be happy that Blizzard is attempting to maximize their ROI at our expense? If they decided they could increase their ROI even more if they charged people $15/mth like WoW, should we all just sit back and be happy about it, because, hey, Blizzard is maximizing their ROI?

Understood... not saying we need to be happy for Bliz for hitting the ceiling on their ROI... just saying that it makes sense if you think about it from a companies perspective rather than what most people do which is demonize any entitiy that makes money other than yourself (not you specifically but people who think there is some kind of mortal sin behind companies making money). My God, look at Apple lately! Me, I'm all for companies making money which means growth so they can make more money which means they will need more people which means more jobs... It's the freaking American Dream.

The key is obviously that they don't monopolize the market where they can set the price and not have to worry about competition... Torch Light 2 has been mentioned several times here so obviously Bliz doesn't have free reign of the market and that is everyones freedom of choice to do so which keeps Blizzard honest...

remember too... the 15% isn't a mandated cost to play the game... it's an optional feature that players can opt in or out of at anytime they feel like it. Besides 70% real money back on digital content is better than 0%


This comment was edited on May 3, 2012, 23:25.
 
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128. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 23:04 Bhruic
 
If you take the size of the development teams (coders, IT support, play testers, artists, sound teams, media teams, sales and public relations, team managers, and on and on and on) coupled with the average wages and benifits for people of their skill level, you have a heafty dollar value that needs to be recouped before a single dollar of profit is seen.

Sure, but all of those things are what the cost of the game is designed to pay for. At least, traditionally speaking. When you are adding a new revenue stream, you really should only be focused on the costs that are associated with developing and supporting that stream - the other costs were always there.

The ~15%(applied however many times on monies in and/or out) is what their research and statistical data tells them the market will bear to maximize a ROI in the shortest time possible coupled with box and digital sales of the game. This could go up over time and could go down depending on all the afore mentioned variables.

Again, probably true, but I'm not sure where you are going with that. As customers, are we supposed to be happy that Blizzard is attempting to maximize their ROI at our expense? If they decided they could increase their ROI even more if they charged people $15/mth like WoW, should we all just sit back and be happy about it, because, hey, Blizzard is maximizing their ROI?
 
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127. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 22:42 Slippy
 
RollinThundr wrote on May 3, 2012, 20:51:
It's not expensive on their end to host, the items are already designed, developed and in the game and paid for.

At that point it's pure greed on Blizzard's part. but of course the usual blizzard sucktard is all for it. How shocking.
I'm not digging here RollinThundr, just curious... what exactly do you do for a living? I manage a factory that employs over 150 people and I do contract programming as a side job for anywhere between three to five companies at any given time.

I've always been amazed at how much things really do cost to research/design/purchase/assemble or build/ship/market and finally sell... The ROI on a game like Diablo 3 will no doubt be a longer time than you might realize. They will make money (don't get me wrong) but throwing statements around like "It's not that expensive to..." you're probably further off than you think. Also remember, D3 doesen't just have to make money to pay off what they invested in it, they also have an obligation to continue to provide a steady revenue stream to support all the other games/servers/web-sites/research/etc that they do on a daily basis that no one sees.

D3 was also publically announced just under 4 years ago. I'm sure they did a lot of R&D before the announcement... So that is, at the very minimum, four years of wages, software, Hardware and 'brick and morter' that has been paid out before even $1 was collected prior to pre-orders. If you take the size of the development teams (coders, IT support, play testers, artists, sound teams, media teams, sales and public relations, team managers, and on and on and on) coupled with the average wages and benifits for people of their skill level, you have a heafty dollar value that needs to be recouped before a single dollar of profit is seen. Where do you think a lot of the profit from past ventures go??? Not in the pockets of the CEO's. Most companies bank the money so that they can afford to pay these new projects for 4, 6 or even 8 years without return so that they don't have to go out and borrow the money while the project is developing (this usually kills projects, especially software related ones). Even then, from a business perspective, they have to ensure that the ROI on the money they are spending or banking must be higher than if they would have rolled those profits into some type of return investment like a bond... otherwise it wouldn't 'pay' to fund the project in the first place.

Yet you still state, "It's not that expensive to..." which I respond, "OOOOhhhhh Kayyyyyyy..."

The ~15%(applied however many times on monies in and/or out) is what their research and statistical data tells them the market will bear to maximize a ROI in the shortest time possible coupled with box and digital sales of the game. This could go up over time and could go down depending on all the afore mentioned variables... but I'm sure I'm wrong and it's much simpler than that...
 
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126. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 21:51 Krovven
 
Dev wrote on May 3, 2012, 21:13:
FAQ says $250 max bid per item. Plus a blizzard credit limit of $250. So on uber items, it will be who can snipe a $250 amount first, gets the item.

Ahh ya. I keep forgetting they have caps on prices and also the amount you can have.

 
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125. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 21:13 Dev
 
Quinn wrote on May 3, 2012, 17:13:
I'm not sure about my following statement, but: you cannot buy gold with RM. This and the fact that your examples are based on MULTIPLAYER prequisite games knock them right off the table.
You were right not to be sure. Since you CAN indeed buy gold with RM. In fact, blizzard mentions this repeatedly in the linked FAQ when talking about buying commodities, and that one of them is in game gold. (that extra 15% hit is for commodities, listing items is a fee instead).

example "Commodities are any non-unique or “stackable” goods that players find, including gems, crafting materials, gold, and other types of functionally identical goods that exist in large quantities"

I often find it helpful to RFTA.

Also, people buy items for single player games as well as multiplayer games. See SIMS and many DLC for single player games. So that's kinda a moot point. Plus, there's no "single player" as such in diablo 3, its more of a solo multiplayer mode thats forced to stay always online.
Krovven wrote on May 3, 2012, 20:34:
I'm sure some twit will be willing to pay $10,000 for some uber item.
FAQ says $250 max bid per item. Plus a blizzard credit limit of $250. So on uber items, it will be who can snipe a $250 amount first, gets the item.

Probably because blizzard doesn't expect people to be making enough money to quit their day jobs.

This comment was edited on May 3, 2012, 21:27.
 
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124. removed May 3, 2012, 20:51 RollinThundr
 
* REMOVED *
This comment was deleted on May 10, 2012, 16:03.
 
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123. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 20:34 Krovven
 
Well, 15% isn't a fixed number, so it has no relevance to the sellers posting value. If it sells for $2, 15% is .26 cents. If it sells for $30, 15% is $4.

A listing fee or deposit is what would effect the minimum price for the seller. This however would discourage selling as real money is involved. I certainly wouldn't post a digital item from D3 if I had to pay to do so, as the item may not sell. This is the WoW AH model, but does not deal with real money.

Unless there is something I haven't seen, the value of items on the D3 RMAH will be entirely player driven. The people that do buy items from D3 RMAH will dictate the value of those items simply by paying what they are willing to pay for them. If an item doesn't start selling until it's posted at .25 cents, then that's the value.

I'm sure some twit will be willing to pay $10,000 for some uber item. Does anyone really care or feel slighted because they didn't get the item, even though you probably never would have anyways? I never saw every item in D2, especially since many weren't even in the game until after I stopped playing. So why should I care if some super uber item is found in D3 like once a month across the entire game and then sold to the willing for masses of money? I just hope that I'm one of the lucky to find whatever that item is.

Hell you never know, crafting components could become a high quantity mover and everyone could make a little here and there if they wanted.

Biggest mistake people are making though is comparing the economics of the WoW AH to the D3 RMAH. Fake Money vs. Real Money. Behaviours in D3 from both buyers and sellers will be far different from those in WoW.
However, there is still the Gold AH in D3, which is more comparable to WoW. How having two very different AH's affects one another, that will be interesting.

 
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122. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 19:44 Bhruic
 
If something sold for $30 yesterday on the RMAH and someone is stupid enough to post say five of the same item at $2 each instead...the people gaming the AH will buy up those $2 items and repost at $30 each.

You know, I might have overreacted on Blizzard. It's entirely possible - plausible, even - that this is the real reason for the 15% fee, to stop people from doing stuff like this. Obviously not with this extreme example, but when I was playing previous MMOs, I enjoyed cornering the market on certain products. If people undercut me, I'd just buy their products and relist at my higher price. But by putting in such a high seller's fee, they really clamp down on that hard. Unless people put up pretty extreme price differences (like this example), market cornering will probably not happen - which is good for buyers.

If that was their intention, then, well, kudos to Blizzard.
 
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121. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 19:33 Slippy
 
Krovven wrote on May 3, 2012, 19:29:
There are economists at Blizz that are far more intelligent than you or I that have put this together.

BINGO!
 
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120. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 19:29 Krovven
 
Quinn wrote on May 3, 2012, 17:13:
There will be thousands of players who are not at all interested in multiplayer. It takes "only a few" (relatively speaking) to collapse the (RM)AH economy entirely.

So people that won't be touching MP or the Auction Houses will collapse the game economy? /facepalm

Quinn wrote on May 3, 2012, 17:13:
This even happened on rare occassions in WoW AH's, where apathetic people dropped stuff you could sell for 30gold on the AH for 2gold.

The economy is player driven. So if the masses choose to let bottom of the barrel prices stick, then they stick and that's the value as determined by the players. If something sold for $30 yesterday on the RMAH and someone is stupid enough to post say five of the same item at $2 each instead...the people gaming the AH will buy up those $2 items and repost at $30 each. They will only need to sell one to make their money back and still profit, the rest is pure profit.

As for gaming the RMAH, it will be interesting to see how things play out. If it sucks, I don't feel any obligation to use it. However since it will be REAL money and not digital coin as in WoW, the business people won't be dropping $20,000 to corner a market for a day like is done in WoW.

Frankly I'm not worried at all about it and don't expect it to effect my enjoyment of the game whether I use the AH or not. There are economists at Blizz that are far more intelligent than you or I that have put this together.

 
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119. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 18:47 Slippy
 
Quinn wrote on May 3, 2012, 17:13:
Dev wrote on May 3, 2012, 15:09:
Quinn wrote on May 3, 2012, 08:22:
I presume the real money idea won't really get off the ground.
HAHAAHAHAAHAHA. Yeah.

You mean like how there's no one who makes money on selling WoW stuff like gold?

You mean how facebook games never make money? (facebook type games are specifically DESIGNED to make you want to spend money. Anything with limited energy/actions, or that takes time for actions, is that kinda game.) You can be sure that blizzard has tweaked drop rates to "encourage" people to use RMAH. The only question is, how far will blizzard go? I don't think they will do fake accounts with one missing item on the set selling in RMAH, but thats something that they could theoretically do.

You are mistaken.

Your examples don't really support your point. I'm not sure about my following statement, but: you cannot buy gold with RM. This and the fact that your examples are based on MULTIPLAYER prequisite games knock them right off the table.

There will be thousands of players who are not at all interested in multiplayer. It takes "only a few" (relatively speaking) to collapse the (RM)AH economy entirely. This even happened on rare occassions in WoW AH's, where apathetic people dropped stuff you could sell for 30gold on the AH for 2gold.

I haven't seen my assertion refuted at all. Also, I'm not claiming "you are mistaken". I'd love to have your crystal ball, however. Where did you buy it?
Actually, the examples are totally applicable. The point is, people will pay money for what they want (real or not really doesn't matter... it's up to the individual how they spend their money).

The examples show this very clearly. I know people that spend huge amounts of money on digital content (which is exactly what D3 items are). You can argue all you want about the people that do this (their intelligence, ethics, whatever). But they do it.

Regardless of if everyone else agrees with it or does the same, people buy what they want. You guys are all arguing semantics over what value these purchases have to the purchasers when in reality… it has nothing to do with you.

If I choose to purchase a set of 18” sub-woofers for my car, my grandma may tell me that it was a waste of money because my car already had a stereo system in it. Fact of the matter is, if it’s my money, I’m free to spend it however I want… I could care less about everyone else’s opinion of my purchases and their validity. There are a lot of people that would think all of us are idiots for purchasing games period and consider it a waste of time and money… but that’s not really any of their business what we do with our money is it?
 
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118. Re: Diablo III Auctions Detailed May 3, 2012, 17:13 Quinn
 
Dev wrote on May 3, 2012, 15:09:
Quinn wrote on May 3, 2012, 08:22:
I presume the real money idea won't really get off the ground.
HAHAAHAHAAHAHA. Yeah.

You mean like how there's no one who makes money on selling WoW stuff like gold?

You mean how facebook games never make money? (facebook type games are specifically DESIGNED to make you want to spend money. Anything with limited energy/actions, or that takes time for actions, is that kinda game.) You can be sure that blizzard has tweaked drop rates to "encourage" people to use RMAH. The only question is, how far will blizzard go? I don't think they will do fake accounts with one missing item on the set selling in RMAH, but thats something that they could theoretically do.

You are mistaken.

Your examples don't really support your point. I'm not sure about my following statement, but: you cannot buy gold with RM. This and the fact that your examples are based on MULTIPLAYER prequisite games knock them right off the table.

There will be thousands of players who are not at all interested in multiplayer. It takes "only a few" (relatively speaking) to collapse the (RM)AH economy entirely. This even happened on rare occassions in WoW AH's, where apathetic people dropped stuff you could sell for 30gold on the AH for 2gold.

I haven't seen my assertion refuted at all. Also, I'm not claiming "you are mistaken". I'd love to have your crystal ball, however. Where did you buy it?
 
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